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Report/Evaluation Type:Project Level Evaluations (PPARs)
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Ghana: Agriculture Development Policy Operation, Phase I–IV (Project Performance Assessment Report)

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This Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) assesses the outcome and sustainability of two consecutive World Bank–financed programmatic series of DPOs in the agriculture sector in Ghana with a total disbursement of US$ 157 million. Objectives of these two projects include: (i) to increase the contribution of agriculture to growth and poverty reduction; (ii) to improve the management of soil Show MoreThis Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) assesses the outcome and sustainability of two consecutive World Bank–financed programmatic series of DPOs in the agriculture sector in Ghana with a total disbursement of US$ 157 million. Objectives of these two projects include: (i) to increase the contribution of agriculture to growth and poverty reduction; (ii) to improve the management of soil and water resources; (iii) to enhance productivity and market access among farmers; and (ii) to improve agriculture sector management. Ratings for the First Agriculture Development Policy Operation Series were as follows: outcome was moderately unsatisfactory, risk to development outcome was significant, World Bank performance was moderately unsatisfactory, and borrower performance was moderately unsatisfactory. These ratings differ from the ICR in all four areas. Ratings for the Second Agriculture Development Policy Operation Series were: outcome was moderately unsatisfactory, risk to development outcome was significant, World Bank performance was moderately unsatisfactory, and borrower performance was moderately unsatisfactory. All ratings except for risk to development are different from the ICR. Lessons include: (i) In a sector such as agriculture, in which responsibilities are fragmented across many different directorates and agencies, impact could be heightened by broadening engagement beyond key counterparts in the leading ministry to other directorates charged with delivering program results. (ii) Rigorous assessment of government commitment and ownership is needed not only at the design stage but throughout implementation. (iii) Potential synergies between sector and general budget support operations could be enhanced by more effective coordination and monitoring and feedback between the two. (iv) Defining DPO series objectives in concrete and measurable terms and scaling ambition down to what the actions in the operations can realistically be expected to influence can improve the demonstration of impact and enhance attribution.

Peru: Fiscal Management and Competitiveness Programmatic Development Policy Loans (Project Performance Assessment Report)

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This PPAR evaluates the programmatic series of Peru FMCDPL I–IV and supplemental financing to FMCDPL II. The FMCDPL series aimed to support the government’s reform program to improve the functioning of Peru’s public sector institutions and business environment. The support program rested on two pillars: (i) improve the efficiency and quality of fiscal management and (ii) enhance competitiveness. Show MoreThis PPAR evaluates the programmatic series of Peru FMCDPL I–IV and supplemental financing to FMCDPL II. The FMCDPL series aimed to support the government’s reform program to improve the functioning of Peru’s public sector institutions and business environment. The support program rested on two pillars: (i) improve the efficiency and quality of fiscal management and (ii) enhance competitiveness. Under these, the FMCDPL program supported nine specific policy objectives: Efficiency and quality of fiscal management: (i) increase sustainability and transparency of fiscal policy, (ii) make tax system more neutral and stable, (iii) strengthen budget reporting and planning, (iv) increase equity in intergovernmental transfers, and (v) improve efficiency and impact of public spending. Competitiveness: (vi) make public sector processes more transparent, accessible, and agile; (vii) expand and deepen international trade; (viii) reduce transaction costs for the private sector to enter, operate in, and exit markets; and (ix) promote sustainable financial deepening. The overall outcome is rated moderately satisfactory, reflecting substantial relevance of the objectives and the design and partial achievement of most objectives under the two pillars. Key lessons include: (i) When strong ownership of the client is demonstrated, a programmatic series of operations can offer the World Bank and its client win-win solutions. (ii) For the World Bank, a multiyear program of support gives it a chance to pursue an extended and coherent analytical agenda that may not be feasible in multiple one-off operations. (iii) To the client, the programmatic series offers a real-time opportunity to learn about the reforms (including both the costs and benefits) and to build on the momentum of initial success. (iv) In the case of Peru, despite all the positive steps the government has taken to enhance efficiency in the allocation of fiscal resources, a pressing need to rationalize the fiduciary and regulatory norms and the multiplicity of control and auditing instances remains. (v) The application of the DDO in this context to the second loan and its supplement illustrated the World Bank’s willingness and ability to support Peru at a time of considerable market uncertainty and, arguably, to help limit contagion.

Senegal: A Decade of World Bank Support to Senegal’s Nutrition Program

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This report assesses the performance of three projects: (1) the Nutrition Enhancement Program, (2) the Nutrition Enhancement Project in Support of the Second Phase of the Nutrition Enhancement Program, and (3) the Rapid Response Child-Focused Social Cash Transfer and Nutrition Security Project. At the start of the new millennium, malnutrition in Senegal was of great concern. Malnutrition Show MoreThis report assesses the performance of three projects: (1) the Nutrition Enhancement Program, (2) the Nutrition Enhancement Project in Support of the Second Phase of the Nutrition Enhancement Program, and (3) the Rapid Response Child-Focused Social Cash Transfer and Nutrition Security Project. At the start of the new millennium, malnutrition in Senegal was of great concern. Malnutrition contributes to child and maternal mortality and morbidity, undermines children’s prospects of reaching their physical and intellectual potential, and undercuts income-earning potential for households and overall productivity and economic development. Its two principal causes are inadequate food intake and illness. Underlying factors are poverty; inadequate access to quality food; inadequate knowledge and behaviors favoring the health of mothers and children; and inadequate services, especially health, clean water, and sanitation. In 2001, the government of Senegal issued a new nutrition policy, supporting a 10-year goal to improve nutrition through a community-based, multisectoral approach. The policy was translated into the 10-year Nutrition Enhancement Program (NEP), financed by the government of Senegal, the World Bank, and eventually others. The government of Senegal also created the Cellule de Lutte contre la Malnutrition (Agency in Charge of the Fight against Malnutrition; CLM), attached to the prime minister’s office, responsible for policy oversight and evaluation.

Colombia: Public and Private Paths to Sustainable Water Supply and Sanitation in Colombia (1999-2011) (Project Performance Assessment Report)

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Water supply and sanitation in Colombia have improved in recent decades. Between 1990 and 2010, access to improved sanitation increased from 67 percent to 82 percent, and access to improved water sources increased from 89 percent to 94 percent (WHO/UNICEF 2010), but coverage in rural areas still lags behind. The three projects covered by this assessment—the Cartagena Water Supply, Sewerage, Show MoreWater supply and sanitation in Colombia have improved in recent decades. Between 1990 and 2010, access to improved sanitation increased from 67 percent to 82 percent, and access to improved water sources increased from 89 percent to 94 percent (WHO/UNICEF 2010), but coverage in rural areas still lags behind. The three projects covered by this assessment—the Cartagena Water Supply, Sewerage, and Environmental Management Project (the Cartagena Project); the Water Sector Reform Assistance Project (WSRAP); and the Water and Sanitation Sector Support Project (WSSSP)—are among the second generation of water supply and sanitation (WSS) projects that benefited from the lessons learned in the 1990s from Bank-supported WSS projects in Colombia. The overall project outcome, based on relevance, efficacy, and efficiency, is rated satisfactory. Relevance of the objectives and design are both rated substantial. Achievement of two objectives was rated high, and one was rated substantial, since all objectives were achieved or surpassed. Efficiency is rated substantial, and risks to development outcome are rated negligible, since ACUACAR had proven to be an efficient and sustainable mixed-enterprise (public-private) model that survived numerous shifts in political administrations. Both Bank and borrower performances are rated satisfactory.

Zambia: Water Sector Performance Improvement Project

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This Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) assesses the development effectiveness of the Water Sector Performance Improvement Project (WSPIP) in Zambia. The project’s original objectives were: (i) the improvement of access to, and sustainability of, the water supply and sanitation services for consumers in Lusaka; and (ii) development of a comprehensive institutional structure Show MoreThis Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) assesses the development effectiveness of the Water Sector Performance Improvement Project (WSPIP) in Zambia. The project’s original objectives were: (i) the improvement of access to, and sustainability of, the water supply and sanitation services for consumers in Lusaka; and (ii) development of a comprehensive institutional structure supporting a coordinated approach to water supply and sanitation investments. In 2009, Additional Financing was approved, and the objectives were revised to (i) improve the technical efficiency and financial sustainability of Lusaka Water and Sanitation Company and improve access to water supply and sanitation services for urban consumers in Lusaka, Kafue, Chongwe, and Luangwa districts, and (ii) strengthen the effectiveness of national water supply and sanitation planning.

Solomon Islands: Rural Development Program (PPAR)

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The Solomon Islands Rural Development Program (Phase I) was the Bank’s first major intervention in Solomon Islands following the Tensions of 1998-2003. The project envisaged making the government more visible in rural areas of the archipelago and sought to re-energize commercial activity and opportunities for agricultural producers. The project’s objective was to take a community driven Show MoreThe Solomon Islands Rural Development Program (Phase I) was the Bank’s first major intervention in Solomon Islands following the Tensions of 1998-2003. The project envisaged making the government more visible in rural areas of the archipelago and sought to re-energize commercial activity and opportunities for agricultural producers. The project’s objective was to take a community driven development (CDD) approach to supporting rural infrastructure and to put in place the necessary structures for CDD to be a useful mechanism for future development.

Kenya: Development of the National Statistical System Project (PPAR)

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This project was initiated in September 2003 at the request of the government of Kenya. The government had prepared the Strategic Implementation Master Plan in data development to counteract a progressive decline of statistical institutions and capacity in the preceding two decades. At the time, a growing international consensus was emerging on the need for global action to promote better Show MoreThis project was initiated in September 2003 at the request of the government of Kenya. The government had prepared the Strategic Implementation Master Plan in data development to counteract a progressive decline of statistical institutions and capacity in the preceding two decades. At the time, a growing international consensus was emerging on the need for global action to promote better statistics among developing countries. The World Bank agreed to provide the support, but the support was delayed for several years due to external events. In March 2007, an International Development Association credit of US$20.5 million was approved for the Development of the National Statistics System Project (also known as the Statistical Capacity Building Program [STATCAP]). It closed in September 2012.

eGhana Project (PPAR)

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This Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) reviews the World Bank’s eGhana Project, which was approved on August 1, 2006 at an original cost of XDR 26.90 million (US$40.0 million) from International Development Association (IDA) resources. The eGhana project responded to the Government’s request for support in implementing its agenda for Information and Communication Technology (ICT)-led Show MoreThis Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) reviews the World Bank’s eGhana Project, which was approved on August 1, 2006 at an original cost of XDR 26.90 million (US$40.0 million) from International Development Association (IDA) resources. The eGhana project responded to the Government’s request for support in implementing its agenda for Information and Communication Technology (ICT)-led growth. This project was based on sound analytical work and the Bank’s experience in Ghana and elsewhere (including the ICT development project in Sri Lanka). The project development objective was to assist the Government of Ghana to generate growth and employment by leveraging ICT and public-private partnerships to: i) develop the IT Enabled Services (ITES) industry, and ii) contribute to improved efficiency and transparency of selected government functions through e-government applications.

Kingdom of Cambodia: Public Financial Management and Accountability Project (Project Performance Assessment Report)

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The World Bank extended support to Cambodia through the Public Financial Management and Accountability Project (PFMAP) during a time when 30 percent of the population lived below the poverty line, human development indicators were discouraging, and public services were largely inaccessible and lacked adequate quality. In this context, sound economic management and the effective and accountable Show MoreThe World Bank extended support to Cambodia through the Public Financial Management and Accountability Project (PFMAP) during a time when 30 percent of the population lived below the poverty line, human development indicators were discouraging, and public services were largely inaccessible and lacked adequate quality. In this context, sound economic management and the effective and accountable use of public resources were paramount in order to improve economic and social improvements. However, many important institutions of governance and public sector management, were destroyed by the ultra-radical Khmer Rouge regime, and only just started to be rebuilt. Public financial management was largely dysfunctional, posed significant fiduciary risks and oversight institutions were unfit to point out systemic problems and corruption. Further, resource mobilization was among the weakest in the region, undermining aggregate fiscal sustainability. The PFMAP aimed to address many of these ailments through strengthening the mobilization and utilization of public resources, bolstering accountability institutions, and developing the capacity of the civil service.

Senegal: Urban Mobility Improvement Project (Project Performance Assessment Report)

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This is the Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) by the Independent Evaluation Group of the World Bank Group on the Senegal Urban Mobility Improvement Project (IDA 33540, IDA 3354A). The project was the first of a two-phase Adaptable Program Loan, but the second Adaptable Program Loan did not proceed because the trigger conditions were not met. The International Development Association Show MoreThis is the Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) by the Independent Evaluation Group of the World Bank Group on the Senegal Urban Mobility Improvement Project (IDA 33540, IDA 3354A). The project was the first of a two-phase Adaptable Program Loan, but the second Adaptable Program Loan did not proceed because the trigger conditions were not met. The International Development Association financed US$75.71 million of the actual project cost of US$156.92 million— with a cost overrun of 152 percent compared with the originally appraised cost of US$103 million. The project was appraised on January 28, 2000; approved by the World Bank’s Board on May 25, 2000; declared effective with a one-year delay on May 14, 2001; and closed on September 30, 2008, after a delay of two years and nine months from the original closing date of December 31, 2005.