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Report/Evaluation Type:Project Level Evaluations (PPARs)
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Arab Republic of Egypt : Integrated Irrigation Improvement and Management Project and Farm-Level Irrigation Modernization Project

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Ratings for the Integrated Irrigation Improvement and Management Project are as follows: Outcome was moderately satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was modest, Bank performance was moderately satisfactory, and Borrow performance was moderately satisfactory. Ratings for the Farm-Level Irrigation Modernization Project are as Show MoreRatings for the Integrated Irrigation Improvement and Management Project are as follows: Outcome was moderately satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was modest, Bank performance was moderately satisfactory, and Borrow performance was moderately satisfactory. Ratings for the Farm-Level Irrigation Modernization Project are as follows: Outcome was moderately satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was modest, and Bank performance was moderately satisfactory. This assessment offers the following lessons: (i) In irrigation systems, such as the Nile Delta’s, that are organized along a hierarchical canal network, irrigation improvement efforts can realize greater impact by applying a systematic approach to rehabilitation, as was done through these two projects, as opposed to addressing different levels of the canal system in isolation. (ii) Efficient implementation of irrigation improvement works requires coordinating and sequencing activities that fall under the mandate of many different entities, which are often beyond the authority of the project implementing agency. (iii) Effecting behavior changes in on-farm water use, agronomic practices, and diversification to higher-value crops requires support beyond improvements to the irrigation water delivery system. (iv) Successfully reforming the institutions that manage irrigation and drainage services, both water users and government agencies, requires greater attention to incentives for collaboration. (v) In a context such as the Nile Delta, where overall efficiency of the irrigation system is already high, there is little scope for addressing water savings at the basin level through infrastructure improvement.

Jamaica : Early Childhood Development Project

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Ratings for the Early Childhood Development Project are as follows: Outcome was moderately unsatisfactory, Bank performance was moderately unsatisfactory, and Quality of monitoring and evaluation was modest. This assessment offers the following lessons: (1) Collaboration, strong national ownership of the NSP, and financial Show MoreRatings for the Early Childhood Development Project are as follows: Outcome was moderately unsatisfactory, Bank performance was moderately unsatisfactory, and Quality of monitoring and evaluation was modest. This assessment offers the following lessons: (1) Collaboration, strong national ownership of the NSP, and financial support are requisite conditions but do not ensure performance and outcomes because the World Bank must also provide rigor and candor in its dialogue and advice. (ii) Country teams need to share and archive lessons and implementation knowledge, including Global Practice knowledge, across projects. (iii) The institutional arrangements for cross-sectoral or cross-ministerial action and coordination are less likely to succeed when authority is centered in one of the involved ministers or ministries. (iv) Intersectoral coordination may more likely be sustained with “light mechanisms” and financial resources that empower ministries and national agencies to focus on achieving a convergence of common policies, actions, and results.

Kyrgyz Republic: The First and Second Development Policy Operations and Programmatic Governance and Competitiveness Development Policy Operation

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The World Bank approved two programmatic series of development policy operations (DPOs) from 2013 through 2016 to improve governance and private sector development in the Kyrgyz Republic. The strategic focus of both series’ objectives was highly relevant to the country context: weak governance (which had become evident during Show MoreThe World Bank approved two programmatic series of development policy operations (DPOs) from 2013 through 2016 to improve governance and private sector development in the Kyrgyz Republic. The strategic focus of both series’ objectives was highly relevant to the country context: weak governance (which had become evident during the 2010 revolution) and the need to shift to a private sector–oriented model of development to increase long-term economic growth. Ratings for First and Second Development Policy Operations are as follows: Outcome was moderately unsatisfactory, Risk to development outcome was high, and Bank performance was moderately unsatisfactory. Ratings for the Governance and Competitiveness Development Policy Operation was moderately unsatisfactory for outcome, high for risk to development outcome, and moderately unsatisfactory for Bank performance. The findings of this Project Performance Assessment Report lead to several operationally relevant lessons include: (i) In a high-risk context, DPOs that are more targeted may have a greater chance of success, with implementation supported by complementary interventions (for example, investment projects and advisory services and analytics). (ii) Discussion of risks to the success of budget support operations should reflect the compounding of risks from parallel budget support operations. (iii) Analytics that take a broader view of constraints to achieving DPO objectives (in this case, those related to private sector development) are needed to ensure relevant design; more narrowly targeted analytics help justify specific reforms. (iv) The focus on governance and competitiveness was appropriate but raises questions regarding whether DPOs are the right modality in the Kyrgyz Republic to achieve reforms that frequently are slow to come to fruition.

Vietnam : Results-Based Rural Water Supply and Sanitation under the National Target Program

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Ratings for the Results-Based Rural Water Supply and Sanitation under the National Target Program project are as follows: Outcome was highly satisfactory, Bank performance was highly satisfactory, and Quality of monitoring and evaluation was substantial. The RWSS PforR’s experience suggests the following lessons: (i) PforR Show MoreRatings for the Results-Based Rural Water Supply and Sanitation under the National Target Program project are as follows: Outcome was highly satisfactory, Bank performance was highly satisfactory, and Quality of monitoring and evaluation was substantial. The RWSS PforR’s experience suggests the following lessons: (i) PforR design needs to be closely aligned with national policies and regulations, particularly regarding financial management. (ii) PforR design and implementation need to exercise equity and inclusivity in targeting beneficiaries to avoid selection bias against hard-to-reach ethnic and the poorest minorities and to reduce their vulnerability in the long term. (iii) The existence of an enabling environment for private participation could enhance the effectiveness of PforRs.

Panama : First, Second, and Third Programmatic Fiscal Management and Efficiency of Expenditures Development Policy Loan

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Ratings for the First, Second, and Third Programmatic Fiscal Management and Efficiency of Expenditures Development Policy Loans are as follows: Outcome was satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was not applicable, Bank performance was moderately satisfactory, and Borrower performance was not applicable. This assessment Show MoreRatings for the First, Second, and Third Programmatic Fiscal Management and Efficiency of Expenditures Development Policy Loans are as follows: Outcome was satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was not applicable, Bank performance was moderately satisfactory, and Borrower performance was not applicable. This assessment offers the following lessons: (i) Development policy financing design requires realism and clarity about risks to implementation, and (ii) Social protection reform in Panama was a matter of political will rather than resource availability.

Tanzania : First Business Environment and Competitiveness for Jobs Development Policy Operation

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Ratings for the First Business Environment and Competitiveness for Jobs Development Policy Operation are as follows: Outcome was moderately unsatisfactory, and Bank performance was moderately unsatisfactory. This assessment offers the following lessons: (i) Although informed risk taking is a feature of DPOs that incorporate Show MoreRatings for the First Business Environment and Competitiveness for Jobs Development Policy Operation are as follows: Outcome was moderately unsatisfactory, and Bank performance was moderately unsatisfactory. This assessment offers the following lessons: (i) Although informed risk taking is a feature of DPOs that incorporate difficult reforms, the associated risks of the BEFJ programmatic series in Tanzania were not clearly acknowledged. (ii) In Tanzania, complex operations that span several ministries may strain the capacity of government counterparts. More focused operations that require less coordination could well be more effective. (iii) Relying predominantly on the Doing Business indicators to identify reform priorities missed addressing some of the most important priorities.

Malawi : Nutrition and HIV/AIDS Project

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Ratings for the Nutrition and HIV/AIDS Project are as follows: Outcome was moderately unsatisfactory, Overall efficacy was modest, Bank performance was moderately unsatisfactory, and Quality of monitoring and evaluation were modest/negligible. This assessment offers the following five lessons and recommendations: (i) While Show MoreRatings for the Nutrition and HIV/AIDS Project are as follows: Outcome was moderately unsatisfactory, Overall efficacy was modest, Bank performance was moderately unsatisfactory, and Quality of monitoring and evaluation were modest/negligible. This assessment offers the following five lessons and recommendations: (i) While the care group model might be a viable option for nutrition communication and potential behavior change, it is critical to focus on the conditions that can make the model successful. (ii) Developing community-based activities at a large scale takes time and continuous support and it is fundamental to adequately estimate the time and resources needed for full implementation. (iii) The care group model requires intensive stakeholder engagement and sensitivity to the social context. (iv) To track output delivery and expected change, the PDO, results framework, and indicators need to be well tailored. (v) Project structures that are sufficiently flexible to adjust to donor and government needs, help implementation and achievement of results In the HIV/AIDS component, the project adeptly responded to shifts in donor funding commitments to ensure efficient deployment of project resources in needed areas.

Mongolia : Sustainable Livelihoods Project and Second Sustainable Livelihoods Project

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Ratings for the Sustainable Livelihoods Project are as follows: Outcome was satisfactory, Overall efficacy was substantial, Bank performance was satisfactory, and Quality of M&E was modest. Ratings for the Second Sustainable Livelihoods Project are: Outcome, moderately satisfactory, Overall efficacy, substantial, Bank Show MoreRatings for the Sustainable Livelihoods Project are as follows: Outcome was satisfactory, Overall efficacy was substantial, Bank performance was satisfactory, and Quality of M&E was modest. Ratings for the Second Sustainable Livelihoods Project are: Outcome, moderately satisfactory, Overall efficacy, substantial, Bank performance, moderately satisfactory, and Quality of M&E, modest. This assessment offers the following lessons: (i) Sustained engagement in CDD, combined with positive political momentum and internal champions, can lead to legal and regulatory changes that support sustainability of the mechanism. (ii) In environments where there is an increasing and unsustainable pressure on the natural resource base, the vulnerability of resource users cannot be reduced successfully without comprehensively addressing the drivers of resource degradation. (iii) Ensuring social inclusion is key in the implementation of group-based interventions to avoid unintended consequences, such as exacerbating distributional inequities or free-rider problems. (iv) Risk forecasting and early-warning systems may not be sustained if the technology is incompatible with or not embedded in local institutions. (v) Increasing the availability of rural finance does not automatically lead to livelihood diversification and may contribute to additional livelihood vulnerability in high-risk sectors. (vi) Efforts to implement index-based insurance programs should thoroughly assess factors that will determine feasibility and sustainability, including the appetite for insurance within the target customer base. (vii) A mismatch between project ambition and support can impair the provision of sufficient capacity building needed for desired behavior change and long-term outcomes.

The Gambia : Growth and Competitiveness Project

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Ratings for the Growth and Competitiveness Project are as follows: Outcome was moderately unsatisfactory, Overall efficacy was modest, Bank performance was unsatisfactory, and Quality of monitoring and evaluation was modest. This assessment offers the following lessons: (i) It is crucial to have a permanent funding mechanism Show MoreRatings for the Growth and Competitiveness Project are as follows: Outcome was moderately unsatisfactory, Overall efficacy was modest, Bank performance was unsatisfactory, and Quality of monitoring and evaluation was modest. This assessment offers the following lessons: (i) It is crucial to have a permanent funding mechanism for smooth functioning and sustainability of an SWBR. Since lack of funding is a major issue, the registry implemented by the project depends on the Ministry of Justice and Ministry of Trade, Industry, Regional Integration and Employment for funding. (ii) Matching grant schemes need to be timely in the project’s trajectory and carefully targeted to participants’ specific needs. (iii) For working with low-capacity clients, especially in fragile and conflict-affected countries, design should be simple and include a realistic set of components and activities implementable by the Project Coordination Unit. (iv) Public-private dialogue to instigate investment climate reforms needs a key champion at the highest level of the government to bring the public and private sector entities together to adopt and implement reforms.

Morocco - Municipal Solid Waste Sector Development Policy Loans 1-4

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Ratings for Loans 1 and 2 of the Municipal Solid Waste Sector Development Policy were as follows: Outcome was moderately satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was significant, Bank performance was satisfactory, and Borrower performance was satisfactory. Ratings for Loans 3 and 4 were as follows: Outcome was satisfactory, Show MoreRatings for Loans 1 and 2 of the Municipal Solid Waste Sector Development Policy were as follows: Outcome was moderately satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was significant, Bank performance was satisfactory, and Borrower performance was satisfactory. Ratings for Loans 3 and 4 were as follows: Outcome was satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was significant, Bank performance was satisfactory, Borrower performance was satisfactory. This assessment offers the following lessons: (i) A policy loan can be a viable instrument to start reforms in the MSWM sector, cover multiple aspects, and obtain the government’s sustained attention and commitment for a nationwide program. However, because of the sector’s complexity, with many actors involved at the national and local levels, these reforms require long-term engagement using various instruments. (ii) Continued attention to strengthening municipalities, both financially and institutionally, is key to enabling them to fulfill their service provision mandate on SWM sustainably. (iii) Behavioral change and leveraging technology are critically needed to establish separation at source and promote waste reduction, reuse, and recycling, promoting the evolution into a circular economy and ensuring environmental sustainability. (iv) Integrated upstream interventions including policy reforms, incentives and investments for circular economy (along with focus on collection and disposal) are needed to achieve sustainable solid waste management systems. (v) Scaling up the formalization of waste pickers requires broader enabling policy changes and capacity building and incentives at the local government level.