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Report/Evaluation Type:Country Focused Validations
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Argentina: Country Assistance Review

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This Country Assistance Review concentrates on the relevance, efficacy, and efficiency of the Bank's program of assistance to Argentina during 1985-95. It is meant to establish accountability, derive lessons from experience, and provide recommendations for future actions. The study distinguishes three subperiods for analysis: 1985-89, during which the Bank's involvement took place in an Show MoreThis Country Assistance Review concentrates on the relevance, efficacy, and efficiency of the Bank's program of assistance to Argentina during 1985-95. It is meant to establish accountability, derive lessons from experience, and provide recommendations for future actions. The study distinguishes three subperiods for analysis: 1985-89, during which the Bank's involvement took place in an environment of extreme financial instability; 1990-94, when reforms intensified and economic recovery was impressive; and the current period, when sustainability of the recovery is the issue. Within all three subcategories the following aspects of Bank assistance are considered: developmental constraints, overall achievements, and the relevance, efficacy, and efficiency of the assistance. Based on the findings of the evaluation, recommendations are made for future assistance strategies.

The World Bank in Indonesia 1999-2006 (Country Assistance Evaluation)

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This Country Assistance Evaluation (CAE) provides an independent assessment of World Bank assistance to Indonesia during the period 1999-2006. The CAE evaluates the Bank program in Indonesia against four objectives or pillars, three of which are derived from the FY01 and FY04 country assistance strategy (CAS) documents. These three pillars are: restoration o f growth and investment, improving Show MoreThis Country Assistance Evaluation (CAE) provides an independent assessment of World Bank assistance to Indonesia during the period 1999-2006. The CAE evaluates the Bank program in Indonesia against four objectives or pillars, three of which are derived from the FY01 and FY04 country assistance strategy (CAS) documents. These three pillars are: restoration o f growth and investment, improving governance and building institutions, and poverty reduction and social service delivery. The fourth pillar, disaster and natural resource management, became a major part of the Bank program following the 2004 tsunami. In each of these areas the CAE sets out the objectives of the Bank program as defined by the CAS. The CAE then uses the actual outcomes, quantified if possible, as a basis for rating the extent to which the objectives were achieved. The CAE finds the outcomes in this area moderately satisfactory relative to the Bank's objectives. The Bank support in this area included adjustment lending in the aftermath of the crisis. After a hiatus from 2001-2003, the Bank resumed its lending in support of broad policy change and institutional development in 2004 with a series of development policy loans and investment loans for infrastructure.

Afghanistan Country Program Evaluation, 2002-11

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Despite extremely difficult security conditions, which deteriorated markedly after 2006, the World Bank Group has commendably established and sustained a large program of support to the country. Despite extremely difficult security conditions, which deteriorated markedly after 2006, the World Bank Group has commendably established and sustained a large program of support to the country.

Brazil Country Program Evaluation, FY04-11

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During the first decade of the 2000s, Brazil made important achievements in shared prosperity: it achieved fiscal sustainability and economic growth while at the same time reducing poverty and income inequality. Brazil also substantially reduced the rate of deforestation in the Amazon. During the first decade of the 2000s, Brazil made important achievements in shared prosperity: it achieved fiscal sustainability and economic growth while at the same time reducing poverty and income inequality. Brazil also substantially reduced the rate of deforestation in the Amazon.

Review of the 2010-2014 Pakistan Country Partnership Strategy Completion Report (CPSCR) and the CPS Progress Report (CPSPR)

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This review examines the implementation of the FY10-FY13 Pakistan Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) and of the FY2012-FY2014 CPS Progress Report (CPSPR). The CPS was jointly implemented by IBRD, IDA, and IFC and covers the joint program of the three institutions. The CPS aimed to improve economic growth, conflict management, and social indicators with interventions organized under four pillars Show MoreThis review examines the implementation of the FY10-FY13 Pakistan Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) and of the FY2012-FY2014 CPS Progress Report (CPSPR). The CPS was jointly implemented by IBRD, IDA, and IFC and covers the joint program of the three institutions. The CPS aimed to improve economic growth, conflict management, and social indicators with interventions organized under four pillars in the results matrix: (i) improving economic governance; (ii) improving human development and social protection; (iii) improving infrastructure to support growth; and (iv) improving security and reducing the risk of conflict. While the CPSPR maintained the same four pillars, it revisited a number of milestones and CPS outcomes, in response to changes in progress in the different areas, as well as to new situations that had emerged by the time of the CPS Progress Report. These new circumstances included the July 2010 and August 2011 floods, slower reforms and security issues, the issuance of the 2011 Framework for Economic Growth, and the 2010 18th Constitutional Amendment that devolved most government services and a share of revenues to the Provinces. The CPS identified three specific top-priority or "transformational" activities, (i) assisting the government to raise the ratio of tax revenue to GDP through strengthened tax policy and administration; (ii) supporting power sector reform so as to ensure a sustainable expansion of power supply; and (iii) addressing security issues related both to coping with the consequences of conflict, and reducing the risk of future conflict. IEG rates the outcome of WBG support as moderately unsatisfactory, consistent with the CPSCR rating. IEG rated two of the four pillars as moderately unsatisfactory, one as unsatisfactory and one as moderately satisfactory. IEG rated Pillar I on improving economic governance as unsatisfactory, with three outcomes partially achieved, and two not achieved; Pillar II on improving human development and social protection as moderately satisfactory, with one outcome achieved, one mostly achieved, and two partially achieved; Pillar III on improving infrastructure as moderately unsatisfactory, with one outcome mostly achieved, three outcomes partially achieved and one not achieved; and Pillar IV as moderately unsatisfactory, with two partially achieved outcomes. Outcomes achieved or mostly achieved were in the areas of safety nets; rural livelihoods; and urban services. Outcomes partially achieved related to public expenditure; public sector management; governance of markets; access to education, health, nutrition and population services; transport and logistics; irrigation and agriculture; environmental sustainability; employment and livelihood opportunities in conflict affected areas, and responsiveness and effectiveness of the state in conflict areas. Other outcomes were not achieved. Of the several CPSCR lessons, this assessment highlights three: (i) the contribution of donor coordination to unifying messages on long-term issues (e.g., energy); (ii) the increased focus of sectors and instruments on CPS goals that can be achieved under a simpler results framework that is more actively monitored and used for program adjustments; and (iii) the pay-off that persistent engagement on key activities, even during difficult times, can have on results. To these, this assessment adds that the Bank is likely to improve results if it analyzes more systematically political economy considerations to improve the likelihood of a more implementable program of assistance.

Tunisia Country Program Evaluation, FY05–13

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From FY05 to FY13, the World Bank Group program in Tunisia aimed to support government in: (i) strengthening the business environment, improving competitiveness, and increasing the global integration of the Tunisian economy; (ii) improving skills and employability of its citizens; (iii)promoting social and economic inclusion; and, particularly since 2011, (iv) improving voice, transparency, and Show MoreFrom FY05 to FY13, the World Bank Group program in Tunisia aimed to support government in: (i) strengthening the business environment, improving competitiveness, and increasing the global integration of the Tunisian economy; (ii) improving skills and employability of its citizens; (iii)promoting social and economic inclusion; and, particularly since 2011, (iv) improving voice, transparency, and accountability. Between FY05 and FY10, the program was mostly Bank-driven. Since 2011, the International Finance Corporation has taken a more active role in Tunisia, complementing Bank efforts. 

World Bank Group Engagement in Resource-Rich Developing Countries: The Cases of the Plurinational State of Bolivia, Kazakhstan, Mongolia, and Zambia

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There is strong learning potential in looking across a group of countries that have one common characteristic. IEG has looked at four countries that have rich endowment with and dependence on non-renewable natural resources: the Plurinational State of Bolivia, Kazakhstan, Mongolia, and Zambia. These countries are otherwise fairly heterogeneous in terms of geographic location, income levels, and Show MoreThere is strong learning potential in looking across a group of countries that have one common characteristic. IEG has looked at four countries that have rich endowment with and dependence on non-renewable natural resources: the Plurinational State of Bolivia, Kazakhstan, Mongolia, and Zambia. These countries are otherwise fairly heterogeneous in terms of geographic location, income levels, and depth of dialogue with the World Bank Group.

World Bank Group Engagement in Small States: The Cases of the OECS, Pacific Island Countries, Cabo Verde, Djibouti, Mauritius, and the Seychelles — Clustered Country Program Evaluation (Executive Summary)

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This report selectively discusses the World Bank Group’s strategic and operational approaches and development issues addressed in its engagement with small states over 2006–14. The report’s goal is to facilitate cross learning, and it focuses on the engagement aspects of particular interest for small states, which are countries with a population of less than 1.5 million. Small states differ Show MoreThis report selectively discusses the World Bank Group’s strategic and operational approaches and development issues addressed in its engagement with small states over 2006–14. The report’s goal is to facilitate cross learning, and it focuses on the engagement aspects of particular interest for small states, which are countries with a population of less than 1.5 million. Small states differ widely, but share several challenges, including limited institutional capacity, acute vulnerability to economic and natural shocks, and an inability to exploit economies of scale. Consequently, many small states benefited from growing International Development Association (IDA) access, despite exceeding the cutoff.

Cluster Country Program Evaluation: Seychelles Country Case Study (FY07–15), Enhancing Competitiveness and Private Sector Development

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Between 1976 and the mid-2000s, Seychelles had transformed itself from a poor subsistence economy into a high middle income country with low levels of poverty and many social indicators comparable to Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries. However, this growth could not be sustained and faced with a growing international financial crisis, severe shortages of Show MoreBetween 1976 and the mid-2000s, Seychelles had transformed itself from a poor subsistence economy into a high middle income country with low levels of poverty and many social indicators comparable to Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries. However, this growth could not be sustained and faced with a growing international financial crisis, severe shortages of foreign exchange resulted in the government defaulting in its international payment obligations in 2008. Starting that year, the government began implementing a radical program of macroeconomic stabilization and structural reforms. The centerpiece of these reforms was a strong fiscal adjustment to reduce the burden of external debt and a progressive dismantling of the role of the state in allocating resources. These reforms were supported by the Standby and Extended Fund Facility (EFF) arrangements of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), and by the Bank through a series of development policy loans (DPLs). Seychelles also benefited from debt relief provided by other official and private international creditors. As a result of the reforms, macroeconomic imbalances were corrected, the role of markets was enhanced, and economic growth restored. However, some important measures such as privatization or SOE reforms (to improve their governance) were stalled or progressing at a very slow pace and there are increasing pressures to reverse some key reforms (such as reducing the size of government).

World Bank Group Engagement in Small States

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country program evaluation, world bank group engagement in small states
The Cases of the OECS, Pacific Island Countries, Mauritius, the Seychelles, Cabo Verde, and Djibouti - Clustered Country Program EvaluationThe Cases of the OECS, Pacific Island Countries, Mauritius, the Seychelles, Cabo Verde, and Djibouti - Clustered Country Program Evaluation