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3 lesson areas from past public health crises for the global response to COVID-19 (coronavirus)

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Myanmar – Completion and Learning Report : IEG Review

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This review of the World Bank Group’s (WBG) Completion and Learning Review (CLR) covers the period of the Country Partnership Framework (CPF), FY15-FY17, and updated in the Performance and Learning Review (PLR) dated June 2, 2017, which extended the CPF period by two years to FY19. This CPF followed the end-2012 Interim Strategy Note (ISN) that resumed WBG operations after a hiatus of about 25 Show MoreThis review of the World Bank Group’s (WBG) Completion and Learning Review (CLR) covers the period of the Country Partnership Framework (CPF), FY15-FY17, and updated in the Performance and Learning Review (PLR) dated June 2, 2017, which extended the CPF period by two years to FY19. This CPF followed the end-2012 Interim Strategy Note (ISN) that resumed WBG operations after a hiatus of about 25 years. To support the Government’s development efforts, the WBG implemented a major expansion of its activities (a seven-fold increase in the Bank’s portfolio), possibly beyond what the country could absorb. Nevertheless, this support contributed to good progress on farming productivity; on access to electricity, telecommunications, health, education, and finance; and on the business climate. IEG agrees with the lessons drawn by the CLR. These are reformulated and summarized as follows: (i) In an environment of constrained implementation capacity, projects with diverse objectives and multiple implementing agencies may become unwieldy and lead to delays in project implementation. (ii) A results framework that excludes the program’s cross-cutting issues will impede assessment of success in addressing these issues. (iii) Use of country systems, support of key reform champions, and joint analytical work are among the factors that build trust with counterparts and stakeholders. (iv) Access to and coordination of trust fund resources will encourage effective implementation and collaboration across development partners. (v) Good and timely data is critical for evidence-based policy dialogue and timely response to country developments. (vi) A “one WBG” approach is critical to leverage WBG instruments toward specific objectives such as access to electricity. Seventh, more careful attention to indicators, including their sources, baselines, targets and time frames will facilitate program monitoring. (vii) A “disconnect’ between written implementation rules and actual practices in Myanmar, e.g., on procurement, may cause implementation delays. IEG adds the following lesson: Joint Implementation Plans (JIPs5) can improve the effectiveness of the “one WBG” approach noted by the CLR lessons. WBG CPFs normally intend collaboration across the Bank, IFC, and MIGA, but more often than not, CPFs do not spell out how such collaboration is to happen. Myanmar’s CPF JIP to improve access to electricity helped ensure that joint work would materialize. IEG rates the CPF development outcome as Moderately Satisfactory and WBG performance as Good.

A global effort is needed to ensure all countries are ready to combat COVID-19 (coronavirus) with evidence

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A global effort is needed to ensure all countries are ready to combat COVID-19 (coronavirus) with evidence
Every government needs robust monitoring and evaluation (M&E) systems now more than ever to design effective policies.Every government needs robust monitoring and evaluation (M&E) systems now more than ever to design effective policies.

Making Choices about Evaluation Design in times of COVID-19: A Decision Tree

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Making Choices about Evaluation Design in times of COVID-19: A Decision Tree
Making Choices about Evaluation Design in times of COVID-19: A Decision Tree (enlarge & download as a PDF) Making Choices about Evaluation Design in times of COVID-19: A Decision Tree (enlarge & download as a PDF)

World Bank Engagement in Situations of Conflict (Approach Paper)

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The World Bank Group has made a strong commitment to addressing the development challenges associated with fragility, conflict, and violence (FCV) as part of its corporate goals. It situates this challenge at the core of its poverty reduction focus, especially since extreme poverty is rising in fragile countries. By 2030, it is estimated that over 50 percent of the world’s extreme poor will live Show MoreThe World Bank Group has made a strong commitment to addressing the development challenges associated with fragility, conflict, and violence (FCV) as part of its corporate goals. It situates this challenge at the core of its poverty reduction focus, especially since extreme poverty is rising in fragile countries. By 2030, it is estimated that over 50 percent of the world’s extreme poor will live in fragile and conflict-affected situations (FCSs). Achieving development outcomes in FCV countries is also critical for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. The purpose of the evaluation is to examine the relationship among various modalities of World Bank engagement in situations of conflict and the achievement of development gains. The evaluation is designed to focus on how the World Bank is working differently in conflict-affected countries, why engagement decisions are made in different contexts, and what contributions the World Bank has made to development gains.

Upcoming Evaluation: World Bank Engagements in Situations of Conflict

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Syrian refugees are fleeing due to shelling in Latakia port city of Syria. Latakia, Syria, 15 February 2016.
This evaluation will assess the World Bank’s approach and support to countries in situations of conflict and provides evidence-based lessons to inform implementation of the World Bank Group Strategy for Fragility, Conflict, and Violence 2020–2025.This evaluation will assess the World Bank’s approach and support to countries in situations of conflict and provides evidence-based lessons to inform implementation of the World Bank Group Strategy for Fragility, Conflict, and Violence 2020–2025.

Adapting evaluation designs in times of COVID-19 (coronavirus): four questions to guide decisions

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Adapting evaluation designs in times of COVID-19 (coronavirus): four questions to guide decisions
A framework organized around four questions to address the ethical, conceptual, and methodological challenges that are affecting programmatic evaluation work during the COVID-19 pandemicA framework organized around four questions to address the ethical, conceptual, and methodological challenges that are affecting programmatic evaluation work during the COVID-19 pandemic

Digital Data Collection During #COVID-19 (Coronavirus)

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COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Response

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IEG Lesson Library: Evaluative Resources and Evidence to inform the COVID-19  Response
Past lessons for the current crisisPast lessons for the current crisis

Of Mice and Men (and World Bank Projects): Harnessing Behavioral Approaches

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Mpulungu, Zambia - March 27, 2015: African schoolgirl in green school uniform against a forest background   Shutterstock By Tatsiana Hendzel
Behavioral Science offers insights and design principles that can be incorporated into existing programs, often at low cost, to increase program reach, effectiveness, and sustainability.Behavioral Science offers insights and design principles that can be incorporated into existing programs, often at low cost, to increase program reach, effectiveness, and sustainability.