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How Does Nutritional Behavior Change Happen? A Tool to Help You Apply the Lessons

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How Does Nutritional Behavior Change Happen? A Tool to Help You Apply the Lessons
A new booklet helps users plan and track behavior change efforts to improve nutritional outcomes. A new booklet helps users plan and track behavior change efforts to improve nutritional outcomes.

Using Qualitative Comparative Analysis to Explore Causal Links for Scaling Up Investments in Renewable Energy

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This paper illustrates how qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) was used to identify causal pathways for scaling up renewable energy to meet sustainable development and climate goals. This paper illustrates how qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) was used to identify causal pathways for scaling up renewable energy to meet sustainable development and climate goals.

Democratic Republic of Congo CLR Review FY13-20

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This is a validation of the Completion and Learning Review (CLR) for the World Bank Group’s (WBG) engagement in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) covering the Country Assistance Strategy (CAS) FY13-FY17. For completeness and learning purposes, and while the CAS formally expired in FY17, IEG has elected to examine the period FY18- FY21 as well, where data are available, as no CPF was in place Show MoreThis is a validation of the Completion and Learning Review (CLR) for the World Bank Group’s (WBG) engagement in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) covering the Country Assistance Strategy (CAS) FY13-FY17. For completeness and learning purposes, and while the CAS formally expired in FY17, IEG has elected to examine the period FY18- FY21 as well, where data are available, as no CPF was in place to replace the CAS. Owing to data limitations and in line with the Working Arrangements between the Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) and WBG, IEG’s review does not rate the CAS’s overall development outcome or the WBG’s performance. The CAS was congruent with country development challenges and the country’s second Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP-II). It aimed to address the major binding constraints, rooted in conflict and fragility, that had prevented DRC from translating a recent track record of economic growth into poverty reduction: ongoing conflict, poor governance, highly limited capacity, and lack of employment opportunities. The program contained four focus areas: (i) increasing state effectiveness and improving good governance; (ii) boosting competitiveness to accelerate private-sector-led growth and job creation; (iii) improving social services delivery and increasing human development indicators; and (iv) addressing fragility and conflict in the Eastern provinces. Gender and climate change were defined as cross-cutting themes.

Meta-Evaluation of IEG Evaluations

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Meta-Evaluation of IEG Evaluations
The meta-evaluation provides inputs on the quality and credibility of the Independent Evaluation Group’s programmatic and corporate process evaluations in support of IEG’s upcoming independent external review. The meta-evaluation provides inputs on the quality and credibility of the Independent Evaluation Group’s programmatic and corporate process evaluations in support of IEG’s upcoming independent external review.

Ghana CLR Review FY13-18

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This review of the World Bank Group’s (WBG) Completion and Learning Review (CLR) for Ghana covers the period of the Country Partnership Strategy (CPS), FY13-FY16, dated August 20, 2013 and updated in the Performance and Learning Review (PLR) dated October 20, 2016, which extended the CPS period by two years to FY18. The CPS and its PLR addressed relevant development challenges, including spatial Show MoreThis review of the World Bank Group’s (WBG) Completion and Learning Review (CLR) for Ghana covers the period of the Country Partnership Strategy (CPS), FY13-FY16, dated August 20, 2013 and updated in the Performance and Learning Review (PLR) dated October 20, 2016, which extended the CPS period by two years to FY18. The CPS and its PLR addressed relevant development challenges, including spatial inequalities and vulnerability, fiscal volatility, slow and low-quality employment growth, and limited government effectiveness. The WBG program as implemented was also well-aligned with the Government’s two successive development programs, the Ghana Shared Growth and Development Agenda, 2010-2013 (GSGDA I) and its successor 2014-2017 GSGDA II. CPS pillars to improve institutions, competitiveness and job creation, and social protection were aligned with the WBG’s poverty reduction and shared prosperity objectives, although sharper selectivity could have strengthened this alignment.

Debt Déjà Vu: Learning from Previous Waves of Debt Crises to Weather Current and Future Storms

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Debt Déjà Vu: Learning from Previous Waves of Debt Crises to Weather Current and Future Storms
Many low-income countries are facing a resurgence in their debt burdens. How did we get back here? Many low-income countries are facing a resurgence in their debt burdens. How did we get back here?

Outcome Ratings Increase Across Entire World Bank Group

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While the RAP 2021 presents encouraging results, as the impact of the pandemic continues to permeate Bank Group operations and outcome measurement systems, outcome ratings may decline in future reviews of the World Bank Group's development effectiveness.While the RAP 2021 presents encouraging results, as the impact of the pandemic continues to permeate Bank Group operations and outcome measurement systems, outcome ratings may decline in future reviews of the World Bank Group's development effectiveness.

Measuring Results in Global Development

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Measuring Results in Global Development
We are less than a decade from delivering on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The SDGs touch on some of the most profound challenges facing humanity, such as ending poverty and reducing inequality. What does it mean to assess results on this massive agenda? Senior evaluator Estelle Raimondo and host Brenda Barbour talk about what they’ve learned about results measurement in global Show More We are less than a decade from delivering on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The SDGs touch on some of the most profound challenges facing humanity, such as ending poverty and reducing inequality. What does it mean to assess results on this massive agenda? Senior evaluator Estelle Raimondo and host Brenda Barbour talk about what they’ve learned about results measurement in global development. How do we rethink Results Based Management to better support countries achieve their development outcomes? And what can the COVID-19 pandemic tell us about current results measurement practices? Listen on  Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or Stitcher podcasts. Related resources Evaluation: The World Bank Group Outcome Orientation at the Country Level Blog: The Results Agenda Needs a Steer – What Could Be its New Course?

Results and Performance of the World Bank Group 2021

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This report, also known as the RAP, is the 2021 annual review of World Bank Group’s development effectiveness. The report assesses the Bank Group’s performance by analyzing the achievement of project and program objectives through validated ratings and presenting an in-depth analysis of possible drivers. This report, also known as the RAP, is the 2021 annual review of World Bank Group’s development effectiveness. The report assesses the Bank Group’s performance by analyzing the achievement of project and program objectives through validated ratings and presenting an in-depth analysis of possible drivers.

Morocco: Municipal Solid Waste Sector Development Policy Loans 1-4 (PPAR)

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The development objective of the first Development Policy Loan series (DPLs 1 and 2) was to improve the financial, environmental, and social performance of Morocco’s MSW sector. The development objective of the second DPL series (DPL 3 and 4) was to improve the economic, environmental, and social performance of Morocco’s MSW sector. The slight revision of the project development objectives Show MoreThe development objective of the first Development Policy Loan series (DPLs 1 and 2) was to improve the financial, environmental, and social performance of Morocco’s MSW sector. The development objective of the second DPL series (DPL 3 and 4) was to improve the economic, environmental, and social performance of Morocco’s MSW sector. The slight revision of the project development objectives between the two-program series comprised changing the “financial performance” part of the initial objective to “economic performance” in the second series. Ratings for Loans 1 and 2 were as follows: Outcome was moderately satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was significant, Bank performance was satisfactory, and Borrower performance was satisfactory. Ratings for Loans 3 and 4 were as follows: Outcome was satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was significant, Bank performance was satisfactory, Borrower performance was satisfactory. This assessment offers the following lessons: (i) A policy loan can be a viable instrument to start reforms in the MSWM sector, cover multiple aspects, and obtain the government’s sustained attention and commitment for a nationwide program. However, because of the sector’s complexity, with many actors involved at the national and local levels, these reforms require long-term engagement using various instruments. (ii) Continued attention to strengthening municipalities, both financially and institutionally, is key to enabling them to fulfill their service provision mandate on SWM sustainably. (iii) Behavioral change and leveraging technology are critically needed to establish separation at source and promote waste reduction, reuse, and recycling, promoting the evolution into a circular economy and ensuring environmental sustainability. (iv) Integrated upstream interventions including policy reforms, incentives and investments for circular economy (along with focus on collection and disposal) are needed to achieve sustainable solid waste management systems. (v) Scaling up the formalization of waste pickers requires broader enabling policy changes and capacity building and incentives at the local government level.