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Uncovering Factors of Project Success: A Literature Review

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Uncovering Factors of Project Success
Which factors associated with better and worse World Bank project outcomes have garnered the most consensus among researchers? Use the tool created for this review to explore these factors.Which factors associated with better and worse World Bank project outcomes have garnered the most consensus among researchers? Use the tool created for this review to explore these factors.

Bridging the Humanitarian Development Divide: Lessons from an Emergency Food Response in the Central African Republic

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This IEG Project Lesson is based on IEG’s Assessment of the World Bank’s Emergency Food Crisis Response and Agriculture Relaunch Project in the Central African Republic – a program executed by WFP and FAO amidst a protracted security crisis.This IEG Project Lesson is based on IEG’s Assessment of the World Bank’s Emergency Food Crisis Response and Agriculture Relaunch Project in the Central African Republic – a program executed by WFP and FAO amidst a protracted security crisis.

China: NanGuang Railway Project (PPAR)

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The purpose of this Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) for the World Bank’s NanGuang Railway Project in China is to offer closer and deeper insights on the project’s outcome, based on updated evidence, including an assessment of the project’s contribution to sector reform and institutional improvement. The PPAR is the first of three PPARs, each for a World Bank–financed large railway Show MoreThe purpose of this Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) for the World Bank’s NanGuang Railway Project in China is to offer closer and deeper insights on the project’s outcome, based on updated evidence, including an assessment of the project’s contribution to sector reform and institutional improvement. The PPAR is the first of three PPARs, each for a World Bank–financed large railway investment project in China that was completed over the past five years. Although the World Bank’s financing ranged from US$200 million to US$300 million and accounted for a small percentage of the total cost for each project, all three projects provided a platform for railway sector policy engagements between the World Bank and the Government. The goal of the NanGuang Railway Project was to enhance transport services in a congested corridor connecting a large and populous less-developed western region in Southwest China and the more-developed Pearl River delta region, with the aim of contributing to regional economic development. The project was also intended to serve as a platform for the World Bank to continue its policy engagement with the Government of China in the railway sector. Ratings for the NanGuang Railway Project are as follows: Outcome is satisfactory, Risk to development outcome is negligible, Bank performance is satisfactory, and Borrower performance is satisfactory. Lessons from the project include: (i) Sound technical design, project preparation, and implementation management, combined with a strong financial capacity, are a recipe for success for a high-speed railway project. (ii) Agglomeration effects are an important benefit of high-speed rail development and should be incorporated in the benefit-cost analysis of such projects. (iii) Successful reforms in large and complex infrastructure sectors such as railways in China require sustained policy dialogue and engagements. (iv) Good connections of high-speed railway lines with other transport modes and between the rail stations and urban centers are critical to achieving the full benefits of high speed trains.

Solomon Islands CLR Review FY13-17

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This review of the Solomon Islands Completion and Learning Review (CLR) of the World Bank Group’s (WBG)1 Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) covers the CPS period, FY13-FY17, and the Performance and Learning Review (PLR) of August 2016. This is the first CPS for Solomon Islands following an Interim Strategy Note (ISN) in 2010. Solomon Islands is a small, remote archipelago in the South Pacific, Show MoreThis review of the Solomon Islands Completion and Learning Review (CLR) of the World Bank Group’s (WBG)1 Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) covers the CPS period, FY13-FY17, and the Performance and Learning Review (PLR) of August 2016. This is the first CPS for Solomon Islands following an Interim Strategy Note (ISN) in 2010. Solomon Islands is a small, remote archipelago in the South Pacific, with a population of 599,419 in 2016. It is a lower-middle-income country with a GNI per capita of US$1,880 in 2016. Between 2013 and 2016, its economy grew at an annual average rate of 2.8 percent while population grew at an annual average rate of 2.1 percent. Economic growth has been driven mostly by logging, services, and agriculture. Solomon is classified as a Fragile and Conflict-Affected State (FCS). The poverty head count ratio using the national poverty line was 12.7 percent in 2013, with a quarter of the population living below US$1.90 a day (2011 PPP). The last estimate for the Gini index was 37 in 2013 (a decline from 46 in 2005). Solomon Islands ranked 156 of 188 countries in the 2015 Human Development Index (HDI), putting it in the low human development category.

Nepal CLR Review FY14-18

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This review of the World Bank Group’s Completion and Learning Review (CLR) covers the period of the Country Partnership Strategy (CPS), FY14-FY18, and updated in the Performance and Learning Review (PLR) of February 21, 2017. This is the first CPS following three consecutive Interim Strategy Notes (ISN) in FY07, FY09, and FY11. Nepal is a low-income country with an average GNI per capita of $ Show MoreThis review of the World Bank Group’s Completion and Learning Review (CLR) covers the period of the Country Partnership Strategy (CPS), FY14-FY18, and updated in the Performance and Learning Review (PLR) of February 21, 2017. This is the first CPS following three consecutive Interim Strategy Notes (ISN) in FY07, FY09, and FY11. Nepal is a low-income country with an average GNI per capita of $733 (2014-2016) and a population of 28.9 million in 2016. GDP per capita growth slowed to 0.6 percent in 2016 and inflation peaked at 12 percent in 2015/2016. The IMF estimates GDP growth at 7.5 percent for 2016/2017, and 5 percent in 2017/2018. The 2016 UNDP Human Development Index ranks Nepal 144 out of 188 countries. Poverty incidence fell from 46 percent in 1996 to 15 percent in 2011; and, it has continued to fall since then according to the Systematic Country Diagnostics (SCD, 2017). From 2004 to 2011, the consumption of the bottom 40 grew twice as fast as the top 60. But, inequality across regions and ethnic groups has been a source of political upheaval. During the CPS period, the country experienced two exogenous shocks and major political transitions. Two earthquakes (April and May 2015) took 9,000 lives and destroyed or damaged assets for approximately one quarter of the country’s GDP. Trade and fuel disruptions in 2015 further impacted economic activity. After the conflicting parties signed a peace treaty in 2006, Nepal has undergone a critical political transition, which culminated in 2015 with a new constitution that veers towards federalism.

Why Growth Alone is Not Enough to Reduce Poverty

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Why Growth Alone is Not Enough to Reduce Poverty
What can evaluative evidence teach us about making growth inclusive?What can evaluative evidence teach us about making growth inclusive?

Strengthening Local Government Capacity to Deliver Services: Four Lessons from Rural Kyrgyz Republic

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Strengthening Local Government Capacity to Deliver Services
This brief captures the lessons from evaluating two World Bank projects implemented in the Kyrgyz Republic, the Village Investment Project and Second Village Investment Project.This brief captures the lessons from evaluating two World Bank projects implemented in the Kyrgyz Republic, the Village Investment Project and Second Village Investment Project.

Bangladesh and Nepal: Strengthening Regional Cooperation for Wildlife Protection in Asia (PPAR)

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South Asia is home to 13–15 percent of the earth’s floral and faunal biodiversity, including some of its most iconic and endangered wildlife species. In recent decades, the region has experienced a rapid loss of critical natural habitats for those species, increasing poaching of wildlife and an expanding illegal trade in wildlife and wildlife products driven largely by consumer demand in East Show MoreSouth Asia is home to 13–15 percent of the earth’s floral and faunal biodiversity, including some of its most iconic and endangered wildlife species. In recent decades, the region has experienced a rapid loss of critical natural habitats for those species, increasing poaching of wildlife and an expanding illegal trade in wildlife and wildlife products driven largely by consumer demand in East Asia. The World Bank project, Strengthening Regional Cooperation for Wildlife Protection in Asia (SRCWP), intended to contribute to the long-term goal for the South Asia Region of stabilizing and increasing the populations and habitats of critically endangered animals (e.g. tigers, snow leopards, rhinos, and elephants). Collaboration in a regional approach to building institutional capacity for curbing the illegal wildlife trade and strengthening management of critical wildlife habitats in national protected areas was the way to achieve that long-term goal. The SRCWP was designed as the first phase of a horizontal (multi-country) adaptable program loan (APL) that, in its second phase, included a similar project in Bhutan. A separate PPAR will be prepared for the project in Bhutan. Ratings for this project are as follows: Outcome is satisfactory, Risk to outcome is moderate, World Bank performance is moderately satisfactory, and Borrower performance is moderately satisfactory. IEG’s review of the SRCWP’s experience suggests the following lessons: (i) Given their design and implementation challenges, regional projects focusing on global public goods require adequate preparation time to conduct a thorough analysis of participant capacities and commitments. (ii) Regional projects aiming to pilot new approaches to collaboration on transboundary wildlife management and illegal wildlife trade require a carefully designed results framework. (iii) Regional projects designed to build institutions and capacity for collaboration on transboundary wildlife management and illegal wildlife trade require a long-term investment to ensure success in achieving results.

Consulting on the “Big 5” Evaluation Criteria - What got us here?

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ieg blog, stakeholder consultation, whatworks
The Rethinking Evaluation blog series, a butterfly effect, and a global consultationThe Rethinking Evaluation blog series, a butterfly effect, and a global consultation

Brazil: Bahia Poor Urban Areas Integrated Development Project - Viver Melhor II (PPAR)

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This is a project performance review of the Bahia Poor Urban Areas Integrated Development Project financed by the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) and implemented between 2005 and 2013 in two cities in the state of Bahia: Salvador and Feira de Santana. The project sought to reduce urban poverty sustainably in the poorest and most vulnerable sections of Salvador by Show MoreThis is a project performance review of the Bahia Poor Urban Areas Integrated Development Project financed by the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) and implemented between 2005 and 2013 in two cities in the state of Bahia: Salvador and Feira de Santana. The project sought to reduce urban poverty sustainably in the poorest and most vulnerable sections of Salvador by providing access to basic services and improved housing and social support services. It was designed when Bahia had the highest quantitative housing deficit in absolute numbers and the highest number of people living in slums in the country. The project follows a series of previous World Bank–financed urban development operations in Bahia that focused on integrating physical infrastructure and social services delivery in low-income communities. This project represents the World Bank’s first large-scale investment supporting urban upgrading at a state level. Outcome is moderately unsatisfactory, Risk to development outcome is significant, Bank performance is moderately unsatisfactory, and Borrower performance is moderately unsatisfactory. Lessons from the project include: (i) Adaptability to local needs, retaining beneficiaries in the territory, and integration between different types of interventions are key features in slum upgrading and social housing. (ii) Weakness in social service delivery can jeopardize expected outcomes and sustainability. Flexible designs and adequate sequencing of activities might help ensure results. (iii) It is crucial in slum upgrading projects to guarantee delivery of all outputs in the social activities cycle because even small failures can jeopardize the expected outcomes. (iv) Adoption of multiphase projects or a programmatic long-term approach in slum-upgrading projects might be appropriate when social capital strengthening is considered necessary to achieve long-term results. (v) Appropriate timing in the preparation of slum-upgrading projects is crucial. Studies and diagnostics require sufficient time (though not too long) to avoid frustrating local expectations or hampering integration. (vi) Continuity in project management is a success factor in complex institutional development and social capital–strengthening projects, allowing familiarity with the local context and building mutual trust with the affected communities. (vii) It is important for World Bank project management to ensure that slum-upgrading projects in urban areas are consistent with existing city plans and are integrated seamlessly into World Bank Group sectoral and thematic operations.