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Ask the Experts: Scaling up the World Bank Group’s Program-for-Results

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Ask the Experts: Scaling up the World Bank Group’s Program-for-Results
Join us to review the Bank Group's early experience with the Program-for-Results (PforR) lending instrument.Join us to review the Bank Group's early experience with the Program-for-Results (PforR) lending instrument.

Rethinking Evaluation - What is Wrong with Development Effectiveness?

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What’s Wrong with Development Effectiveness?
The way we look at development effectiveness needs a facelift. The way we look at development effectiveness needs a facelift.

Tax Revenue Mobilization - Lessons from World Bank Group Support for Tax Reform

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This learning note reviews existing IEG evaluative evidence on the Bank Group’s support to tax policy and administration reform produced by the Independent Evaluation Group over FY2005-15. It identifies the drivers of performance as well as lessons to inform the future work of the Bank Group. This learning note reviews existing IEG evaluative evidence on the Bank Group’s support to tax policy and administration reform produced by the Independent Evaluation Group over FY2005-15. It identifies the drivers of performance as well as lessons to inform the future work of the Bank Group.

Putting Behavior Change at the Center of Development and Evaluation

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Putting Behavior Change at the Center of Development and Evaluation
By putting people at the center of the development process, we start to understand why they choose what they do and the constraints they face.By putting people at the center of the development process, we start to understand why they choose what they do and the constraints they face.

Evaluation for Results-Oriented Management - What Can Development Stakeholders Learn from the Michelin Guide?

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What Can Development Stakeholders Learn from the Michelin Guide?
At its heart, the Guide Michelin represents an evaluation system par excellence.At its heart, the Guide Michelin represents an evaluation system par excellence.

Pacific Island Countries CLR Review FY11-17

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This is a summary of six CLR reviews covering the World Bank Group (WBG) programs for the Pacific Island Countries (PICs) of Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Samoa, Tonga, and Tuvalu. The summary is based on IEG’s individual country assessments of the completion and learning reviews prepared for each country. During the period under review, each country prepared a stand-alone Country Show MoreThis is a summary of six CLR reviews covering the World Bank Group (WBG) programs for the Pacific Island Countries (PICs) of Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Samoa, Tonga, and Tuvalu. The summary is based on IEG’s individual country assessments of the completion and learning reviews prepared for each country. During the period under review, each country prepared a stand-alone Country Assistance/Partnership Strategy (CAS/CPS), in contrast to previous engagements that were done under an umbrella regional strategy for the Pacific Islands. Except for Tuvalu’s country program, all CPSs were joint programs between the Bank and IFC. The assessments are based on the original CPSs, since no Performance and Learning Reviews (PLRs) were undertaken for any of the countries. These countries have populations ranging from 10,000 (Tuvalu) to over 200,000 (Samoa)— Tuvalu is the smallest WBG member country. They are among the most remote and geographically dispersed countries in the world, and range from low middle income (Kiribati, US$3,390 GNI per capita in current dollars) to upper middle income (Tuvalu, US$6,120 GNI per capita in current dollars). Some of them joined the WBG as recently as 2010 (Tuvalu). The high cost of operating in these small, remote countries, and limited resources from IDA, constrained the World Bank Group to engage with them at the regional level or through multi-country platforms until 2008, when the governments of Australia and New Zealand decided to enter into funding partnerships with the WBG. These partnerships—combined with significant increases in IDA disaster risk management and climate change—gave the WBG the capacity to operate at scale in the Pacific Island Countries. For most of the countries—except Samoa and Tonga—this program was the first direct engagement with the WBG. All programs were financed by IDA and trust-funds, and some of the countries (Marshall Islands, Micronesia, and Tuvalu) had to be granted an exception for small islands to qualify for IDA funds in light of their high per capita income.

Ghana: Agriculture Development Policy Operation, Phase I–IV (Project Performance Assessment Report)

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This Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) assesses the outcome and sustainability of two consecutive World Bank–financed programmatic series of DPOs in the agriculture sector in Ghana with a total disbursement of US$ 157 million. Objectives of these two projects include: (i) to increase the contribution of agriculture to growth and poverty reduction; (ii) to improve the management of soil Show MoreThis Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) assesses the outcome and sustainability of two consecutive World Bank–financed programmatic series of DPOs in the agriculture sector in Ghana with a total disbursement of US$ 157 million. Objectives of these two projects include: (i) to increase the contribution of agriculture to growth and poverty reduction; (ii) to improve the management of soil and water resources; (iii) to enhance productivity and market access among farmers; and (ii) to improve agriculture sector management. Ratings for the First Agriculture Development Policy Operation Series were as follows: outcome was moderately unsatisfactory, risk to development outcome was significant, World Bank performance was moderately unsatisfactory, and borrower performance was moderately unsatisfactory. These ratings differ from the ICR in all four areas. Ratings for the Second Agriculture Development Policy Operation Series were: outcome was moderately unsatisfactory, risk to development outcome was significant, World Bank performance was moderately unsatisfactory, and borrower performance was moderately unsatisfactory. All ratings except for risk to development are different from the ICR. Lessons include: (i) In a sector such as agriculture, in which responsibilities are fragmented across many different directorates and agencies, impact could be heightened by broadening engagement beyond key counterparts in the leading ministry to other directorates charged with delivering program results. (ii) Rigorous assessment of government commitment and ownership is needed not only at the design stage but throughout implementation. (iii) Potential synergies between sector and general budget support operations could be enhanced by more effective coordination and monitoring and feedback between the two. (iv) Defining DPO series objectives in concrete and measurable terms and scaling ambition down to what the actions in the operations can realistically be expected to influence can improve the demonstration of impact and enhance attribution.

Rethinking Evaluation - Efficiency, Efficiency, Efficiency

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Rethinking Evaluation - Efficiency, Efficiency, Efficiency
In times of resource constraints – have there ever been days without? – one would think “efficiency” is at the top of the agenda for almost everyone. Unfortunately, we have seen limitations to this evaluation criterion in definition and above all in practice.In times of resource constraints – have there ever been days without? – one would think “efficiency” is at the top of the agenda for almost everyone. Unfortunately, we have seen limitations to this evaluation criterion in definition and above all in practice.

Building Effective Partnerships Between the UN and World Bank Group

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Building Effective Partnetships Between the UN and World Bank Group
An African proverb says: “If you want to go quick, go alone; if you want to go far, go together.” But what if we need to go far—quickly? More specifically, how can the World Bank Group go far quickly together with its key partners?An African proverb says: “If you want to go quick, go alone; if you want to go far, go together.” But what if we need to go far—quickly? More specifically, how can the World Bank Group go far quickly together with its key partners?

IEG LIVE: Has Off-Grid Electrification Come of Age?

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Our panel of experts discuss the commercial viability and potential of off-grid technologies. Our panel of experts discuss the commercial viability and potential of off-grid technologies.