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Creating Markets: Drivers of Success

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Creating Markets: Drivers of Success
Join us for a conversation on the factors underlying the success of market creation activities as the IFC implements its new corporate strategy, and the contributing roles of the World Bank and MIGA to that strategy. Join us for a conversation on the factors underlying the success of market creation activities as the IFC implements its new corporate strategy, and the contributing roles of the World Bank and MIGA to that strategy.

Measuring up: When “what works” doesn’t

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Measuring Up: When “What Works” Doesn’t
What an essay about closing the achievement gap in US public schools tells us about “what works” in international developmentWhat an essay about closing the achievement gap in US public schools tells us about “what works” in international development

Results and Performance of the World Bank Group 2018

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results and performance of the world bank group 2018, rap 2018
The Results and Performance of the World Bank Group (RAP) report is IEG's annual review of the development effectiveness of the World Bank Group. The report synthesizes trends in ratings and identifies explanatory factors behind portfolio performance.The Results and Performance of the World Bank Group (RAP) report is IEG's annual review of the development effectiveness of the World Bank Group. The report synthesizes trends in ratings and identifies explanatory factors behind portfolio performance.

The Natural Resource Degradation-Human Vulnerability Nexus: An Evaluation of the World Bank’s Support for Sustainable and Inclusive Natural Resource Management (2009-2019) (Approach Paper)

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Renewable natural resources represent essential livelihood assets for many resource-dependent communities, many of whom are extremely poor. Chronic poverty, natural resource dependency, and degradation of natural resources are strongly interrelated. Climate change exacerbates the magnitude of the natural resource degradation challenge, especially for the most vulnerable populations. The World Show MoreRenewable natural resources represent essential livelihood assets for many resource-dependent communities, many of whom are extremely poor. Chronic poverty, natural resource dependency, and degradation of natural resources are strongly interrelated. Climate change exacerbates the magnitude of the natural resource degradation challenge, especially for the most vulnerable populations. The World Bank has long recognized the importance of natural resources for poverty reduction and sustainable development in its policies and strategies, addressing environmental degradation through multiple interventions. This is a forward-looking evaluation that will generate evidence about how well the World Bank has addressed natural resource degradation issues that threaten the lives and livelihoods of vulnerable resource dependent people – what works, where, why and for whom? The evaluation will inform policy discussions concerning what the Bank should do more of, less of, and differently, including on the implementation of the World Bank’s Climate Adaptation and Resilience Action Plan (FY21-25). Evidence gathered will inform the wider global development debate and policy dialogue on ways to address and alleviate the negative effects of the resource degradation-human vulnerability nexus, in affected areas.

The International Finance Corporation’s Engagement in Fragile and Conflict-Affected Situations - Results and Lessons

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Fragility, conflict and violence (FCV) pose a major challenge for development and for reaching the Bank Group’s twin goals. Enabling appropriate private sector activities can be a means to break free of the fragility trap by supporting economic growth, promoting local employment and income earning opportunities, generating government revenues, and delivering goods and services. However, the Show MoreFragility, conflict and violence (FCV) pose a major challenge for development and for reaching the Bank Group’s twin goals. Enabling appropriate private sector activities can be a means to break free of the fragility trap by supporting economic growth, promoting local employment and income earning opportunities, generating government revenues, and delivering goods and services. However, the private sector faces substantial constraints in fragile and conflict-affected situations (FCS). This report takes stock of available evidence regarding the effectiveness of IFC’s support in FCS. It aims to inform IFC’s strategy in FCS as IFC seeks to scale up its activities in FCS as part of its commitments under the Capital Increase Package, and to provide inputs for the Bank Group’s Fragility, Conflict and Violence (FCV) strategy currently being developed.

India: Tamil Nadu Irrigated Agriculture Modernization and Water-Bodies Restoration and Management Project (PPAR)

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This Project Performance Assessment Report assesses the development effectiveness of India’s Tamil Nadu Irrigated Agriculture Modernization and Water-Bodies Restoration and Management (TN-IAMWARM) project, which was approved in 2007 and closed in 2015. The development objective of the project was to assist selected subbasin stakeholders in increasing the productivity of irrigated agriculture in Show MoreThis Project Performance Assessment Report assesses the development effectiveness of India’s Tamil Nadu Irrigated Agriculture Modernization and Water-Bodies Restoration and Management (TN-IAMWARM) project, which was approved in 2007 and closed in 2015. The development objective of the project was to assist selected subbasin stakeholders in increasing the productivity of irrigated agriculture in the state of Tamil Nadu within an integrated water resources management framework. Ratings for this project are as follows: Outcomes was satisfactory, Risk to development was substantial, Bank performance was satisfactory, and Borrower performance was satisfactory. Lessons from the project include: (i) Irrigation project design that combines improvements in infrastructure with activities for improving agricultural and water use practices, agricultural inputs, and marketing support and linkages, can be a viable and effective approach for improving agricultural productivity and rural livelihoods. (ii) For the several line departments that are necessarily involved in multi-dimensional irrigation projects, the provision of appropriate training can play a pivotal role in fostering collaborative behavior among the departments, and to orient them towards the farmer beneficiary as the focal point of their services. (iii) The tone set by the project leadership is crucial for fostering and sustaining collaborative behavior across diverse implementing agencies. (iv) Including a water resource management component in an irrigation project can be a strategically important decision with long-term payoffs but may have to be supplemented by other projects to realize the potential for wider water management and climate smart agricultural policies. (v) Introduction of water budgeting concepts at the village or sub-basin level is a crucial first step to build on by gradually promoting the measurement of water use and agricultural water productivity.

Changes in Carbon Markets and Regulatory Systems from Kyoto to Paris and How the World Bank Group Responded to these Changes (Working Paper)

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This study provides a structured review of the existing literature on changes in international market mechanisms for greenhouse gas reductions and related regulatory systems. The assessment period 1997 to 2016 starts with the signing of the Kyoto Protocol and ends with the entry into force of the Paris Agreement. It can be differentiated into a period of emergence of market mechanisms until 2005 Show MoreThis study provides a structured review of the existing literature on changes in international market mechanisms for greenhouse gas reductions and related regulatory systems. The assessment period 1997 to 2016 starts with the signing of the Kyoto Protocol and ends with the entry into force of the Paris Agreement. It can be differentiated into a period of emergence of market mechanisms until 2005, a gold rush from 2006 to 2011, a fragmentation of markets lasting until 2015, and a brief post-Paris period of relaunch, of a new climate policy agreement. A key aspect of the review is how the World Bank Group responded to changes. The review includes about 300 peer-reviewed articles and about 40 articles from gray literature coming from highly-reputed sources. A large share of the literature examined covers the flexible mechanisms of the Kyoto Protocol with a strong focus on the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). This is a consequence of the unexpected success of the CDM in the carbon market, at least until 2011–12, as well as the transparency of the mechanism that has facilitated research. As topics and issues related to the international carbon market emerged, the Bank Group tried to address them, focusing on developing countries to enhance their participation in the market. However, there is only limited peer-reviewed literature that assesses the Bank Group strategies and operations. Key changes in markets and regulatory frameworks as well as the responses of the Bank Group can be grouped into four main periods that are briefly discussed below.

Lebanon: Cultural Heritage and Urban Development Project (PPAR)

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Lebanon has a rich and diverse cultural patrimony inherited from many civilizations that existed in succession on its territory. But this heritage has been damaged by disasters and conflict, and more recently by the rapid and unmanaged growth of Lebanon’s historic cities. The World Bank partnered with the Government of Lebanon and bilateral agencies in 2003 to implement the Cultural Show More Lebanon has a rich and diverse cultural patrimony inherited from many civilizations that existed in succession on its territory. But this heritage has been damaged by disasters and conflict, and more recently by the rapid and unmanaged growth of Lebanon’s historic cities. The World Bank partnered with the Government of Lebanon and bilateral agencies in 2003 to implement the Cultural Heritage and Urban Reconstruction Project (CHUD)-to help conserve and restore the country’s cultural patrimony in five of its historic cities – in Baalbek, Byblos, Saida, Tripoli and Tyre. CHUD’s objective was to create the conditions for increased local economic development and enhanced quality of life its historic centers and to improve the conservation and management of the country’s cultural heritage. The US$119 million project was financed with an IBRD loan,  parallel financing from the Governments of France and Italy, and with counterpart financing. Ratings for this project are as follows: Outcome was moderately satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was substantial, Bank performance was moderately satisfactory, and Borrower performance was moderately satisfactory. Lessons from the project include: (i) Assigning economic values of cultural heritage requires consideration of both its “use” and “non-use” values. (ii) Urban rehabilitation projects designed to expand public space require ex-ante and intermittent analysis of the risks associated with local economic displacement, due to restricted access and the changing preferences of upgraded space. (iii) Infrastructure-led urban rehabilitation of economically dense and culturally sensitive urban cores requires complementary investments in “soft skills” to ensure effective two-way communication about project aspirations and to adapt to citizen concerns. (iv) Cultural heritage and sustainable tourism investments must be designed to respect residents’ needs and aspirations and to protect communities’ residential right from unintended consequences.  

Seriously funny: Using humor to spark deep conversations about evaluation

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Seriously funny: Using humor to spark deep conversations about evaluation
How humor helped IEG facilitate meaningful conversations about evaluation during a recent event.How humor helped IEG facilitate meaningful conversations about evaluation during a recent event.

World Bank Group Evaluation Principles

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This document, World Bank Group Evaluation Principles, sets out core principles for evaluation as well as underlying principles for selecting, conducting, and using evaluations, as relevant to the World Bank Group’s mission, and each institution’s mandate, system of governance, and operating environment. It is informed by international evaluation principles and good practice standards and builds Show MoreThis document, World Bank Group Evaluation Principles, sets out core principles for evaluation as well as underlying principles for selecting, conducting, and using evaluations, as relevant to the World Bank Group’s mission, and each institution’s mandate, system of governance, and operating environment. It is informed by international evaluation principles and good practice standards and builds on knowledge of current practices and processes around evaluation in the World Bank Group. In agreeing to this common set of principles, we aim to enhance development results by strengthening accountability and learning through evaluation.