Search

Topic:Public-Private Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 69

Bhutan CLR Review FY15-19

PDF file
This review of the World Bank Group (WBG) Completion and Learning Review (CLR) covers the period of the Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) FY15-19, as updated in the Performance and Learning Review (PLR) dated May 8, 2017. Bhutan is a small, land-locked, lower middle-income country. Between 2015 and 2019 the annual real GDP growth has varied between 6.2 percent and 3.7 percent. The country’s Show MoreThis review of the World Bank Group (WBG) Completion and Learning Review (CLR) covers the period of the Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) FY15-19, as updated in the Performance and Learning Review (PLR) dated May 8, 2017. Bhutan is a small, land-locked, lower middle-income country. Between 2015 and 2019 the annual real GDP growth has varied between 6.2 percent and 3.7 percent. The country’s economic growth was bolstered in recent years by investments in hydropower. Gross National Income (GNI) per capita is now only ten percent below the threshold for upper middle-income countries. Between 2007 and 2017 the poverty headcount ratio (measured at the US$3.20 poverty line in 2011 purchasing power parity terms) dropped from 36 to 12 percent of the population. The CPS noted that Bhutan needed to sustain macroeconomic stability while creating a business environment to promote private sector growth and job creation. The hydro-led growth had created some short-term macroeconomic imbalances, which called for careful management of fiscal and monetary policies. At the same time, it was critical to provide a better investment climate that would be more conducive to private sector development, diversification of the economy and job creation. Also, Bhutan’s large stock of natural capital called for increasing its sustainable contribution to the economy, while protecting the environment and human well-being. Related challenges included rapid urbanization, low agriculture productivity, limited infrastructure, difficult topography, and vulnerability to disaster and climate change. The 2020 Systematic Country Diagnostic (SCD) confirmed these development challenges.

Brazil: National Biodiversity Mainstreaming and Institutional Consolidation Project and Sustainable Cerrado Initiative (PPAR)

PDF file
Brazil is the most biodiverse country in the world, holding an estimated one-fifth of all known flora and fauna species. It also contains a wide range of climate types in seven major biomes, including the vast Amazon and now largely depleted Atlantic rainforests, the Cerrado savanna (which covering 2 million square kilometers is second in size only to Amazônia), the semiarid Caatinga, the world’s Show MoreBrazil is the most biodiverse country in the world, holding an estimated one-fifth of all known flora and fauna species. It also contains a wide range of climate types in seven major biomes, including the vast Amazon and now largely depleted Atlantic rainforests, the Cerrado savanna (which covering 2 million square kilometers is second in size only to Amazônia), the semiarid Caatinga, the world’s largest Pantanal wetlands, and an extensive coastline. The National Biodiversity Mainstreaming and Institutional Consolidation Project (PROBIO 2) was funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF). Its project development objectives were (i) to promote mainstreaming of biodiversity at the national level in key public and private sector planning strategies and practices, and (ii) to consolidate and strengthen institutional capacity to produce and disseminate relevant biodiversity information. The project development objectives of the Sustainable Cerrado Initiative (GEF Cerrado) were to enhance biodiversity conservation in, and improve environmental and natural resource management of, the Cerrado in Brazil’s territory through appropriate policies and practices. Ratings from the National Biodiversity Mainstreaming and Institutional Consolidation Project are as follows: Outcome was satisfactory, Overall efficacy was satisfactory, Bank performance was moderately satisfactory, and Quality of monitoring and evaluation was modest. Ratings for the Sustainable Cerrado Initiative are as follows: Outcome was moderately unsatisfactory, Overall efficacy was modest, Bank performance was moderately unsatisfactory, and Quality of monitoring and evaluation was modest. Lessons from the project include: (i) A critical element for the success of projects that seek to promote the mainstreaming of biodiversity across sectors, both public and private, is strong ownership and active participation across the project’s life by the institutions involved. (ii) A firm up-front understanding of the underlying political, economic, and territorial contexts of the geographic area in which a project is seeking to establish new or expand existing protected areas is essential to properly gauge the possibilities of achieving such an objective. (iii) Experience in Brazil (and elsewhere) has shown that government commitment to project objectives and design can shift significantly over time due to changes in administrations, both at the federal and state government levels. (iv) Learning from environment projects that use concessional financing, both successful and unsuccessful, can have policy implications that extend beyond the original project’s intentions.

Lao People's Democratic Republic: Nam Theun 2 Hydroelectric and Social and Environment Projects (PPAR)

PDF file
The Nam Theun 2 Hydropower Project (NT2 HPP) was a major undertaking in the Lao People’s Democratic Republic (Lao PDR) when the country’s energy sector was nascent, the overall economy was transitioning from central planning to greater market orientation, and private participation was limited in the energy sector. The NT2 HPP was developed primarily to export electricity to Thailand to boost Show MoreThe Nam Theun 2 Hydropower Project (NT2 HPP) was a major undertaking in the Lao People’s Democratic Republic (Lao PDR) when the country’s energy sector was nascent, the overall economy was transitioning from central planning to greater market orientation, and private participation was limited in the energy sector. The NT2 HPP was developed primarily to export electricity to Thailand to boost economic growth in Lao PDR in support of the implementation of the country’s Growth and Poverty Elimination Strategy. The project was also designed to be catalytic—a model to guide subsequent exploitation of the country’s extensive hydropower resources. Ratings for the Nam Theun 2 Hydroelectric Project are as follows: Outcome was satisfactory, Bank performance was moderately satisfactory, and Quality of monitoring and evaluation was substantial. The NT2 HPP—given its scale, complexity, and significance—provides many lessons for consideration in future hydropower development initiatives: (i) A project design to capture more comprehensive development outcomes from hydropower, as recommended in the World Bank’s Water Working Note “Directions in Hydropower: Scaling Up for Development,” needs to balance its ambitions with the corresponding implementation capacity, particularly as it relates to experience with environmental protection and social development that may exceed the capabilities of many hydropower developers (World Bank 2009a). (ii) Strategically catalytic interventions, such as the NT2 HPP, can lead to transformational impacts when there is a commitment to and capacity for implementing follow-on actions such as replicating and mainstreaming its features. In the NT2 HPP, power financing through a PPP was catalytic in helping to develop the sector and fueling export-led growth. (iii) Bank Group (and other IFI) participation, including the use of guarantees, can be instrumental in mitigating risks and enhancing the private sector’s confidence to mobilize in nascent markets with unexploited potential and scalable investment opportunities. (iv) A government’s adherence to its commitment to implement a sound development strategy may be a more significant driver for achieving broader poverty alleviation outcomes than earmarking revenues for specific expenditures that are fungible within a general budget. (v) Hydropower can produce sizable global environmental benefits in terms of combating climate change, although the negative impacts that can arise from greenhouse gas emissions from storage reservoirs should also be accounted for.

Public Utility Reform: What lessons can we learn from IEG evaluations in the energy and water sectors?

PDF file
Public Utility Reform: What lessons can we learn from IEG evaluations in the energy and water sectors?
This synthesis provides a review of operationally relevant findings and lessons from World Bank-supported utility reforms in the energy and water sectors, as identified in IEG evaluation products.This synthesis provides a review of operationally relevant findings and lessons from World Bank-supported utility reforms in the energy and water sectors, as identified in IEG evaluation products.

Pakistan: First and Second Programmatic Fiscally Sustainable and Inclusive Growth Development Policy Credit (PPAR)

PDF file
This Project Performance Assessment Report evaluates a programmatic series of two development policy operations for Pakistan. The series was the World Bank’s first policy-based operation in Pakistan in more than a decade. The project development objective was to (a) foster private and financial sector development to bolster economic growth, and (b) mobilize revenue while expanding fiscal space to Show MoreThis Project Performance Assessment Report evaluates a programmatic series of two development policy operations for Pakistan. The series was the World Bank’s first policy-based operation in Pakistan in more than a decade. The project development objective was to (a) foster private and financial sector development to bolster economic growth, and (b) mobilize revenue while expanding fiscal space to priority social needs”. The objective was matched by two policy areas. The first policy area covered reforming trade tariffs, privatizing state-owned enterprises, improving business registration, developing the microinsurance sector, and improving the availability of credit information. The second policy area covered improving revenue performance and enhancing the social safety net program. Ratings for the First and Second Programmatic Fiscally Sustainable and Inclusive Growth Development Policy Credits are as follows: Outcome was moderately satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was high, Bank performance was moderately satisfactory, Borrower performance was moderately unsatisfactory, and Quality of M&E was modest. This PPAR offers the following lessons: (i) In Pakistan, the World Bank reengagement with development policy lending after a long break benefited from a longer-term strategy (or program) that provides for several interrelated DPCs, a large and relevant technical assistance program, and close cooperation with the IMF. (ii) Dividing important sectoral issues among separate operations could be an effective strategy when the government is facing multiple reform challenges. (iii) Political economy analysis and communication support related to politically sensitive reforms were insufficient.

The International Finance Corporation’s and Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency’s Support for Private Investment in Fragile and Conflict-Affected Situations (Approach Paper)

PDF file
In countries affected by fragility, conflict, and violence (FCV), the private sector can play a critical role in providing jobs and income. Inclusive and sustainable economic growth led by private investment can help heal grievances stemming from economic exclusion. Although the private sector in fragile environments and in conflict is often informal, constrained, and distorted and may involve Show MoreIn countries affected by fragility, conflict, and violence (FCV), the private sector can play a critical role in providing jobs and income. Inclusive and sustainable economic growth led by private investment can help heal grievances stemming from economic exclusion. Although the private sector in fragile environments and in conflict is often informal, constrained, and distorted and may involve entities that are parties to conflict, it is essential for providing livelihoods, income, and services to people. This evaluation seeks to inform the implementation of the Bank Group FCV strategy and IFC’s and MIGA’s commitments to scale up investments in FCS. As the Bank Group is launching its 2020–25 FCV strategy, this evaluation will inform its implementation. The report will help gauge the effectiveness of and develop lessons from efforts to enhance the range of IFC and MIGA initiatives to scale up and improve sustainable private investments in FCS under the Capital Increase Package and IFC’s and MIGA’s strategies.

What is blended finance, and how can it help deliver successful high-impact, high-risk projects?

Web Resource
What is blended finance, and how can it help deliver successful high-impact, high-risk projects?
An introduction to an effective tool to crowd in private sector financing where it is most needed.An introduction to an effective tool to crowd in private sector financing where it is most needed.

Burundi - Completion and Learning Review : IEG Review

PDF file
This review of the World Bank Group’s (WBG) Completion and Learning Review (CLR) covers the period of the Country Assistance Strategy (CAS), FY13-16, and updated in the Performance and Learning Review (PLR) dated February 25, 2015. The World Bank Group’s (WBG) CAS had three focus areas: (i) improving competitiveness, (ii) improving resilience by consolidating social stability, and (iii) Show MoreThis review of the World Bank Group’s (WBG) Completion and Learning Review (CLR) covers the period of the Country Assistance Strategy (CAS), FY13-16, and updated in the Performance and Learning Review (PLR) dated February 25, 2015. The World Bank Group’s (WBG) CAS had three focus areas: (i) improving competitiveness, (ii) improving resilience by consolidating social stability, and (iii) strengthening governance. The CAS was broadly aligned with the Government’s Second National Poverty Reduction Strategy (PRSP II), 2012-2015, which seeks to improve governance, growth and job creation, social services, and environmental/spatial management. Specifically, the CAS focus areas and objectives supported PRSP II objectives on quality of economic infrastructure, promotion of the private sector and job creation, strengthening the social safety net, capacity building and improved performance in the healthcare system, and fiscal management.

Managing Urban Spatial Growth: An evaluation of World Bank support to land administration, planning and development (Approach Paper)

PDF file
Managing urban spatial growth matters to reduce poverty and promote shared prosperity. As cities sprawl they become more unequal and inefficient. Land markets enable urban development through private investments in land and assets that guide spatial growth. However, when land management and land use planning are deficient, informal land markets proliferate, fostering the growth of slums and urban Show MoreManaging urban spatial growth matters to reduce poverty and promote shared prosperity. As cities sprawl they become more unequal and inefficient. Land markets enable urban development through private investments in land and assets that guide spatial growth. However, when land management and land use planning are deficient, informal land markets proliferate, fostering the growth of slums and urban sprawl. The World Bank has outlined an agenda for supporting urbanization which frames urban development in the context of a market‐based approach informed by spatial considerations. For over three decades the World Bank has been supporting and strengthening city institutions which manage urban spatial growth through land administration, land use planning and land development. The purpose of this evaluation is to assess the relevance and contribution of WB support to enhance the capacity of clients to manage urban spatial growth through land administration, land use planning and land development. The evaluation will document what works and why; and to draw lessons for future interventions. The evaluation will also assess World Bank support to foster client’s capacity to meet relevant SDG’s as they relate to the management of urban spatial growth including, equal rights over ownership and control (SDG 1.4.2), inclusive and sustainable urbanization and capacity for participatory, integrated and sustainable human settlement planning and management in all countries (SDG 11.3) as outlined in the United Nations New Urban Agenda 2017‐20305. This evaluation complements the forthcoming evaluation Building Urban Resilience: An evaluation of the World Bank Groups Evolving Experience 2007‐2017.

Armenia: Energy Efficiency Project (PPAR)

PDF file
This Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) evaluates the development effectiveness of the Energy Efficiency Project in Armenia. The project was selected for a PPAR to learn from an innovative pilot project that influenced the design and experience of other energy efficiency projects and interventions. Energy efficiency is of strategic importance for the World Bank given its role in Show MoreThis Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) evaluates the development effectiveness of the Energy Efficiency Project in Armenia. The project was selected for a PPAR to learn from an innovative pilot project that influenced the design and experience of other energy efficiency projects and interventions. Energy efficiency is of strategic importance for the World Bank given its role in supporting climate change mitigation, which is a major corporate priority. The project development objective was to reduce energy consumption of social and other public facilities in Armenia and decrease greenhouse gas emissions through the removal of barriers to the implementation of energy efficiency investments in the public sector. The project was financed through a Global Environment Facility (GEF) grant and government funds totaling $10.7 million. The project was implemented in 2012–16. Ratings from the Energy Efficiency Project were as follows: Outcomes was moderately satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was substantial, Bank performance was moderately satisfactory, and Borrower performance was moderately satisfactory. Lessons from the project include: (i) Energy efficiency revolving funds can be market enablers by partnering with commercial and financial institutions, but there are few prospects for scale up and energy efficiency market transformation without the commitment of private businesses. (ii) Practical demonstration of the technical and financial feasibility of an innovative energy efficiency transaction program can only influence positive systemic change in the legal and regulatory framework if there is government commitment to the approach and long‐term funding. (iii) Appropriate legislation and regulation can provide incentives to undertake energy efficiency measures, but they are not sufficient without a strong government energy efficiency agency in place that is responsible for monitoring and enforcement. (iv) The design of a pilot project needs to go beyond demonstration effects and lay the foundation for sustainable operations over time.