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The World Bank Group Partnership with the Philippines, 2009–18

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The World Bank Group Partnership with the Philippines, 2009–18 Country Program Evaluation
This Country Program Evaluation (CPE) assesses the development effectiveness of the World Bank Group program in the Philippines between 2009 and 2018.This Country Program Evaluation (CPE) assesses the development effectiveness of the World Bank Group program in the Philippines between 2009 and 2018.

Philippines CLR Review FY15-19

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The Philippine economy has been growing rapidly over the past decade. However, performance on poverty reduction, inequality and human development has been persistently low. The country is also a natural disaster hotspot, with frequent typhoons, tropical storms and earthquakes. It has also been affected by internal unrest, predominantly the protracted conflict and violence on the southern island Show MoreThe Philippine economy has been growing rapidly over the past decade. However, performance on poverty reduction, inequality and human development has been persistently low. The country is also a natural disaster hotspot, with frequent typhoons, tropical storms and earthquakes. It has also been affected by internal unrest, predominantly the protracted conflict and violence on the southern island of Mindanao. The 2014 Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) was well aligned with the Philippine Development Plan (PDP) 2011-16 that aimed at reducing poverty and improving the lives of the poorest segments of the population. The subsequent PDP 2017-22 shifted some emphasis to major infrastructure investments – where the WBG has not been particularly active – but also seeks to lift about six million citizens from poverty, achieve upper-middle income status by 2022, and to deliver a comprehensive agenda for peace and development in conflict-affected areas. The WBG program as adjusted in the 2017 PLR was therefore well aligned with significant aspects of the current PDP. The CPS set out a program that was divided in five focus areas: Transparent and Accountable Government; Empowerment of the Poor and the Vulnerable; Rapid, Inclusive and Sustained Economic Growth; Climate Change, Environment, and Disaster Risk Management; and Peace, Institution-Building, and Social and Economic Opportunity – all these areas were of high priority for the country and under the PDP.

Republic of Congo CLR Review FY13-17

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The Republic of Congo is a lower middle-income country with a GNI per capita (Atlas method in current $) of $1,480 in 2017. Oil production had been the main driver of growth and source of government revenues, with average annual GDP growth of 5.8 percent during 2008-2012. The poverty headcount ratio at $1.90 per day (2011 PPP, percent of population) had been declining, from 50.2 percent in 2005 Show MoreThe Republic of Congo is a lower middle-income country with a GNI per capita (Atlas method in current $) of $1,480 in 2017. Oil production had been the main driver of growth and source of government revenues, with average annual GDP growth of 5.8 percent during 2008-2012. The poverty headcount ratio at $1.90 per day (2011 PPP, percent of population) had been declining, from 50.2 percent in 2005 to 37 percent in 2011. However, poverty reduction occurred mainly in urban areas, with rural areas experiencing an increase in the poverty rate. There was little change in the Gini coefficient between 2005 and 2011. During the CPS period, oil prices dropped, resulting in a decline in average annual GDP growth to 1.4 percent during 2013-2017. The Systematic Country Diagnostic (2018) for the Republic of Congo estimated the poverty rate to have declined further to 35 percent in 2016. The human development index improved from 0.57 in 2012 to 0.61 in 2017. The overarching objectives of the CPS were to promote economic diversification and improve outcomes in public services with three pillars: (i) competitiveness and employment; (ii) vulnerability and resilience; and (iii) capacity building and governance.

China CLR Review FY13-17

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China, with a population of 1.4 billion, is an upper middle-income country with a GNI per capita of $8,690 in 2017. During 2013-2017, the economy grew annually at 7.1 percent on average, slower than the previous CPS period of 11.0 percent. A long period of economic growth put pressure on the environment and raised serious sustainability challenges. China is now contributing around 30 percent to Show MoreChina, with a population of 1.4 billion, is an upper middle-income country with a GNI per capita of $8,690 in 2017. During 2013-2017, the economy grew annually at 7.1 percent on average, slower than the previous CPS period of 11.0 percent. A long period of economic growth put pressure on the environment and raised serious sustainability challenges. China is now contributing around 30 percent to the world’s GHG emissions, partly because it is the largest consumer of carbon for electricity. Significant gains in poverty reduction continued during the CPS period. Absolute poverty, measured at $1.90 per day (2011 PPP), dropped from 1.9 percent in 2013 to 0.5 percent in 2018. Poverty and vulnerability in China are concentrated in rural areas and lagging regions in Central and Western China. The welfare of the bottom 40 percent of the income distribution has increased steadily. The Gini coefficient dropped to .46 in 2015 after having risen to a high of .5 in 2008. China’s Human Capital Index (HCI) stands at 0.67 and ranks 45th amongst 158 countries. The CPS had two focus areas: (i) supporting greener growth; and (ii) promoting more inclusive development as well as a cross-cutting theme of advancing mutually beneficial relations with the world.

Social contracts matter for development: What can the World Bank do about it?

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Social Contracts Matter for Development: What can the World Bank do about it?
Lessons from emerging practices of using Social Contract Diagnostics to shape World Bank Country Engagements. Lessons from emerging practices of using Social Contract Diagnostics to shape World Bank Country Engagements.

Building ownership, consensus, and credibility during economic stabilization: Lessons from Jamaica

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Building ownership, consensus, and credibility during economic stabilization: Lessons from Jamaica
This brief captures the lessons from evaluating a World Bank budget support program implemented in Jamaica—the Economic Stabilization and Foundations for Growth Development Policy Loan (DPL).This brief captures the lessons from evaluating a World Bank budget support program implemented in Jamaica—the Economic Stabilization and Foundations for Growth Development Policy Loan (DPL).

Building Urban Resilience: An Evaluation of the World Bank Group’s Evolving Experience (2007-2017)

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Building Urban Resilience: An Evaluation of the World Bank Group’s Evolving Experience
This evaluation examines the World Bank Group’s evolving experience in building resilience in urban areas during the period 2007–17. The focus of this evaluation is the World Bank Group’s support to clients in building urban resilience—to cope, recover, adapt and transform—in the face of shocks and chronic stresses.This evaluation examines the World Bank Group’s evolving experience in building resilience in urban areas during the period 2007–17. The focus of this evaluation is the World Bank Group’s support to clients in building urban resilience—to cope, recover, adapt and transform—in the face of shocks and chronic stresses.

How to establish a nationwide social protection program: Five lessons from the Philippines

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How to establish a nationwide social protection program: Five lessons from the Philippines
This brief captures the lessons from evaluating a World Bank project implemented in the Philippines—the Social Welfare and Development Reform Project (SWDRP).This brief captures the lessons from evaluating a World Bank project implemented in the Philippines—the Social Welfare and Development Reform Project (SWDRP).

Measuring up: When “what works” doesn’t

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Measuring Up: When “What Works” Doesn’t
What an essay about closing the achievement gap in US public schools tells us about “what works” in international developmentWhat an essay about closing the achievement gap in US public schools tells us about “what works” in international development

Philippines: Social Welfare and Development Reform Project (PPAR)

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This is the Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) by the Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) of the World Bank Group on the Social Welfare and Development Reform Project (including additional financing) in the Philippines. The project had two objectives: (i) strengthen the effectiveness of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) to efficiently implement the Pantawid Show MoreThis is the Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) by the Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) of the World Bank Group on the Social Welfare and Development Reform Project (including additional financing) in the Philippines. The project had two objectives: (i) strengthen the effectiveness of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) to efficiently implement the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program (the CCT program, known as Pantawid); and (ii) strengthen the effectiveness of the DSWD to expand an efficient and functional National Household Targeting System of social protection programs. Results for this Social Welfare and Development Reform Project are as follows: Outcome was highly satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was substantial, Bank performance was satisfactory, and Borrower performance was satisfactory. Lessons from the project include: (i) The success of a large, nationwide social protection program like Pantawid lies in creating and strengthening the operational and institutional systems needed to support it. (ii) Strong government ownership is critical to establishing and sustaining ambitious programs like Pantawid. (iii) The World Bank’s ability to bring global knowledge to bear and skillfully deploy a full technical engagement was key to success. (iv) Continuous monitoring and evaluation are essential to maintaining CCT programs like Pantawid and ensuring their constant evolution. (v) The quality of education and health, not just service utilization, is critical to achieve the expected gains in human capital. (vi) As for all CCTs, a graduation strategy is essential to ensure that the program delivers on longer-term benefits and acts as a stepping stone into more stable livelihoods.