Search

Content type
Topic:Governance
Displaying 1 - 10 of 322

🎧 Learning from Development Policy Financing

Web Resource
Learning from Development Policy Financing
Development Policy Financing (DPF) is a major instrument of multilateral development banks and has played a prominent role in the World Bank’s pandemic response. Also known as policy-based lending, DPF is a fast-dispersing instrument that provides non-earmarked funds to a country's national budget. How does DPF work and how successful has it been in achieving its various objectives? The World Show More Development Policy Financing (DPF) is a major instrument of multilateral development banks and has played a prominent role in the World Bank’s pandemic response. Also known as policy-based lending, DPF is a fast-dispersing instrument that provides non-earmarked funds to a country's national budget. How does DPF work and how successful has it been in achieving its various objectives? The World Bank’s Director of Policy Operations, Stéphane Guimbert, and IEG host Jeff Chelsky take stock of the trends and lessons of using policy-based lending to support developing economies.   Listen on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or Stitcher. Related resources World Bank Report – 2021 Development Policy Financing Retrospective: Facing Crisis, Fostering Recovery (2022) IEG Evaluation – Addressing Country-Level Fiscal and Financial Sector Vulnerabilities: An Evaluation of the World Bank Group’s Contributions (2021) IEG Evaluation – World Bank Support for Public Financial and Debt Management in IDA-Eligible Countries (2021) IEG Evaluation – The International Development Association's Sustainable Development Finance Police: An Early-Stage Evaluation (2021) Conversation highlights [00:04-07:55] How does Development Policy Financing (DPF) and its prior actions work? [07:56-14:44] What are key lessons emanating from the Bank’s fifth DPF Retrospective? [14:45-20:07] The role of Development Policy Operations (DPOs) in crisis response. [20:08-22:25] Measuring success – what makes a DPO good? [22:26-25:08] The use of DPOs in countries affected by fragility, conflict or violence (FCV). [25:09-27:30] Determining the size of a Development Policy Operation.

International Finance Corporation Country Diagnostics and Strategies Under IFC 3.0: An Early-Stage Assessment (Approach Paper)

PDF file
In December 2016, the International Finance Corporation (IFC) introduced its latest strategy, IFC 3.0, which aimed to enhance IFC’s development impact by creating “new and stronger markets for private sector solutions” (IFC 2019) and “mobilizing private capital at significant scale” (IFC 2021) where it is needed the most. To achieve IFC 3.0’s aims of market creation and private capital Show MoreIn December 2016, the International Finance Corporation (IFC) introduced its latest strategy, IFC 3.0, which aimed to enhance IFC’s development impact by creating “new and stronger markets for private sector solutions” (IFC 2019) and “mobilizing private capital at significant scale” (IFC 2021) where it is needed the most. To achieve IFC 3.0’s aims of market creation and private capital mobilization at scale, IFC recognized it would need new tools and analytical capabilities to: (i) Develop a deeper understanding of the constraints limiting private sector solutions and opportunities in each country’s economy, including in key enabling and productive sectors; and (ii) Allow for a more strategic selection, sequencing, and implementation of its activities and stronger coordination across the World Bank Group. At the country level, IFC 3.0’s tools included a new diagnostic instrument, the Country Private Sector Diagnostic (CPSD), and a new strategy instrument, the IFC Country Strategy. The objective of the evaluation is to assess whether IFC Country Strategies and CPSDs have enhanced IFC’s ability to create markets and mobilize capital at scale and have informed Bank Group collaboration on private sector development. The evaluation will focus on IFC Country Strategies and CPSDs completed since their inception in fiscal year (FY)18. The evaluation will cover all 50 IFC Country Strategies and the 31 CPSDs completed between FY18 and December 31, 2021.

Addressing Gender Inequalities in Countries Affected by Fragility, Conflict and Violence: An Evaluation of WBG Support (Approach Paper)

PDF file
The WBG recognizes that achieving gender equality is particularly challenging in those settings, but it is critical to make progress in peace building and resilience to crisis. Addressing gender gaps is a priority in FCV-affected countries because fragility and conflict disproportionally affect women and girls and exacerbate gender inequalities. The World Bank Group recognizes that effective Show MoreThe WBG recognizes that achieving gender equality is particularly challenging in those settings, but it is critical to make progress in peace building and resilience to crisis. Addressing gender gaps is a priority in FCV-affected countries because fragility and conflict disproportionally affect women and girls and exacerbate gender inequalities. The World Bank Group recognizes that effective responses to gender inequalities in FCV-affected countries need to be context-specific, country-owned, systemic, and sustainable. The goal of this formative evaluation is to provide lessons on what worked well, less well, and why, regarding the World Bank Group’s support to FCV-affected countries to achieve transformational change towards gender equality in two areas: women’s and girls’ economic empowerment and gender-based violence.

The World Bank Group’s Experience with the IDA Private Sector Window: An Early-Stage Assessment

PDF file
Employees of Vita Foam working in Freetown, Sierra Leone on June 19, 2015. Photo © Dominic Chavez/World Bank
This report is an early-stage assessment of the World Bank Group’s experience with the International Development Association (IDA) Private Sector Window (PSW).This report is an early-stage assessment of the World Bank Group’s experience with the International Development Association (IDA) Private Sector Window (PSW).

The Drive for Financial Inclusion: Lessons of World Bank Group Experience – Approach Paper

PDF file
Financial inclusion is expected to help address poverty and shared prosperity by improving and smoothing household incomes at the same time as reducing vulnerability to shocks, improving investments in education and health, and encouraging the growth of businesses and related employment. The poor face immense financial challenges. The income of the poor is not only lower but also more volatile. Show MoreFinancial inclusion is expected to help address poverty and shared prosperity by improving and smoothing household incomes at the same time as reducing vulnerability to shocks, improving investments in education and health, and encouraging the growth of businesses and related employment. The poor face immense financial challenges. The income of the poor is not only lower but also more volatile. They often rely on a range of unpredictable jobs or on weather-dependent agriculture. Transforming irregular income flows into a dependable resource to meet daily needs represents a crucial challenge for the poor. Another challenge lies in meeting costs if a major expense arises (such as a home repair, medical service, or funeral) or if a breadwinner falls ill. Savings, credit, insurance, and remittances can each help the poor to smooth volatile incomes and expenses, providing a margin of safety when income drops or expenses rise, or providing the needed funds for children’s education or health care. Additionally, financial inclusion in the form of financial services for microentrepreneurs and very small enterprises has been guided by the intention that it can help them to survive, grow, and generate income for the poor. Nonetheless, evidence that financial inclusion directly takes people out of poverty is mixed. The main objective of this evaluation is to enhance learning from the Bank Group’s experience, including the World Bank, IFC, and MIGA, in supporting client countries in their efforts to advance financial inclusion over the period of FY14–20. It both updates and expands on a 2015 IEG evaluation, which assessed Bank Group activity for FY07–13. It not only updates an evaluation of WBG activity in financial inclusion and in support of national financial inclusion strategies, but also plans for a deep focus on the following: (i) A retrospective look at the drive for universal financial access (the UFA 2020 initiative), including outcomes achieved in its 25 focus countries; (ii) Progress and challenges in women’s access to financial services (gender); (iii) An in-depth examination of digital financial inclusion efforts and the role of digital financial services as vehicles for financial inclusion. This work intends to focus more deeply on outcomes on the ground for poor households and microenterprises. It intends to understand the relevance and effectiveness of these activities, including the outcomes and the mechanisms by which observed outcomes were achieved. The evaluation aims to identify lessons applicable to the World Bank, IFC or MIGA by obtaining evidence-based findings of what works, why, and for whom.

Mozambique Country Program Evaluation (Approach Paper)

PDF file
Mozambique’s recent history is characterized by economic growth, rising inequality, and fragility. After the end of a civil war in 1992, Mozambique enjoyed a sustained period of growth until 2014, positioning it as one of the fastest-growing countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. Such growth, however, was not broadly shared and inequality increased. Fragility in Mozambique traces back to the uneven Show MoreMozambique’s recent history is characterized by economic growth, rising inequality, and fragility. After the end of a civil war in 1992, Mozambique enjoyed a sustained period of growth until 2014, positioning it as one of the fastest-growing countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. Such growth, however, was not broadly shared and inequality increased. Fragility in Mozambique traces back to the uneven historical development of the state, in part shaped by geographical characteristics, and to the nature of the political settlement and the exclusionary political arrangements that it maintains. This evaluation seeks to assess the World Bank Group’s success at helping Mozambique address challenges that constrain its development. The evaluation will cover fiscal years (FY)08–21 and is timed to inform Mozambique’s next Country Partnership Framework (CPF). The evaluation will assess the Bank Group’s support for addressing three development challenges and drivers of fragility in Mozambique: (i) rural poverty linked to weak agricultural productivity and regional inequalities; (ii) weak institutions and governance; and (iii) vulnerability to natural disasters and climate change.

Results and Performance of the World Bank Group 2021 – Concept Note

PDF file
The Results and Performance of the World Bank Group (RAP) report is the annual review of evidence from IEG evaluation and validation work on the development effectiveness of the World Bank Group (WBG). It will be the eleventh in a series that began in 2010; it will also be the second report departing from the exclusive traditional focus on ratings to also provide additional evidence on the Show MoreThe Results and Performance of the World Bank Group (RAP) report is the annual review of evidence from IEG evaluation and validation work on the development effectiveness of the World Bank Group (WBG). It will be the eleventh in a series that began in 2010; it will also be the second report departing from the exclusive traditional focus on ratings to also provide additional evidence on the nature of intended outcomes across the WBG. RAP 2021 will build and expand on the RAP 2020 innovations by refining the classification framework for intended outcomes and integrating analysis of existing ratings (trends) with the outcome classification analysis. Like past RAP reports, RAP 2021 will provide an analysis of project ratings and factors associated with performance as measured by those ratings. Expanding on the past, RAP 2021 will analyze and interpret these ratings through the lens created by the refined typology of intended outcomes. This lens would enable an examination of ratings that takes into account portfolio composition in terms of the type (classification) of intended outcomes, as well as the likelihood of achieving those intended outcomes. In other words, RAP 2021 aims at providing a joint assessment of ratings and the risk-return profile of the portfolio generating those ratings.

Madagascar Country Program Evaluation (Approach Paper)

PDF file
This Country Program Evaluation will assess the development effectiveness of the World Bank Group’s engagement in Madagascar between fiscal year (FY)07 and FY21, and will explore whether the Bank Group’s $3 billion engagement was appropriate for the Malagasy context of weak governance, widespread poverty, and economic stagnation and adapted to changing circumstances, priorities, and lessons from Show MoreThis Country Program Evaluation will assess the development effectiveness of the World Bank Group’s engagement in Madagascar between fiscal year (FY)07 and FY21, and will explore whether the Bank Group’s $3 billion engagement was appropriate for the Malagasy context of weak governance, widespread poverty, and economic stagnation and adapted to changing circumstances, priorities, and lessons from experience. It’s main goal is to distill lessons from experience to inform future engagement. The evaluation is timed to inform the formulation of the new CPF with Madagascar, and also aims to derive significant lessons for the broader development community. To these ends, it will (i) assess the relevance and effectiveness of the Bank Group’s support to Madagascar between FY12 and FY21 and (ii) examine the Bank Group’s contribution to improving governance and fostering rural development during FY07–21.

World Bank Support for Public Financial and Debt Management in IDA-Eligible Countries

Web Resource
people walking up a staircase with abstract images of revenue and plants, indicating growth
This evaluation provides an assessment of World Bank support to IDA-eligible countries for public finance and debt management between FY08–17. This evaluation provides an assessment of World Bank support to IDA-eligible countries for public finance and debt management between FY08–17.

World Bank Group Support for Domestic Revenue Mobilization (Approach Paper)

PDF file
Effective domestic revenue mobilization (DRM) is essential for developing countries’ abilities to finance their development goals in a sustainable and equitable manner. DRM—the generation of government revenues from domestic activities (World Bank and IMF 2015)—is relevant to at least 2 of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This evaluation focuses on the World Bank Group’s support to Show MoreEffective domestic revenue mobilization (DRM) is essential for developing countries’ abilities to finance their development goals in a sustainable and equitable manner. DRM—the generation of government revenues from domestic activities (World Bank and IMF 2015)—is relevant to at least 2 of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This evaluation focuses on the World Bank Group’s support to its clients to improve central government DRM, which includes revenue from tax (VAT, direct taxes, excises and customs) and nontax collections (including royalties from extractives). Recently, DRM has faced challenges aggravated by the ongoing coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and the attendant collapse of economic activity in many countries. The pandemic is expected to affect many aspects of DRM, including tax payments and tax compliance. This evaluation aims to assess the relevance, effectiveness, and coherence of Bank Group–supported strategies and interventions over FY16–19 to help clients improve DRM, as well as assess the extent to which the World Bank identified the distributional implications of its support to DRM in country interventions.