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Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) Work Program and Budget (FY22) and Indicative Plan (FY23-24)

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IEG adapted its work program to align with the rapid adjustment of the WBG’s strategic priorities to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. At the same time, IEG will continue to keep a line of sight to other emerging and longstanding corporate priorities including the IDA 20 special themes and cross-cutting areas, climate change ambition, concerns on debt sustainability, the Green, Resilient, Show MoreIEG adapted its work program to align with the rapid adjustment of the WBG’s strategic priorities to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. At the same time, IEG will continue to keep a line of sight to other emerging and longstanding corporate priorities including the IDA 20 special themes and cross-cutting areas, climate change ambition, concerns on debt sustainability, the Green, Resilient, Inclusive Development (GRID) framework, the new WBG knowledge framework and the outcome orientation agenda. IEG will also continue its efforts to create a diverse and inclusive workplace, aligned with the corporate priority on Ending Racism.

IDA's Partnership for Poverty Reduction (FY94-FY00) An Independent Evaluation

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Results and Performance of the World Bank Group 2021 – Concept Note

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The Results and Performance of the World Bank Group (RAP) report is the annual review of evidence from IEG evaluation and validation work on the development effectiveness of the World Bank Group (WBG). It will be the eleventh in a series that began in 2010; it will also be the second report departing from the exclusive traditional focus on ratings to also provide additional evidence on the Show MoreThe Results and Performance of the World Bank Group (RAP) report is the annual review of evidence from IEG evaluation and validation work on the development effectiveness of the World Bank Group (WBG). It will be the eleventh in a series that began in 2010; it will also be the second report departing from the exclusive traditional focus on ratings to also provide additional evidence on the nature of intended outcomes across the WBG. RAP 2021 will build and expand on the RAP 2020 innovations by refining the classification framework for intended outcomes and integrating analysis of existing ratings (trends) with the outcome classification analysis. Like past RAP reports, RAP 2021 will provide an analysis of project ratings and factors associated with performance as measured by those ratings. Expanding on the past, RAP 2021 will analyze and interpret these ratings through the lens created by the refined typology of intended outcomes. This lens would enable an examination of ratings that takes into account portfolio composition in terms of the type (classification) of intended outcomes, as well as the likelihood of achieving those intended outcomes. In other words, RAP 2021 aims at providing a joint assessment of ratings and the risk-return profile of the portfolio generating those ratings.

Meet the Evaluator: Bekele Shiferaw discusses the nexus between natural resources and human development

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Meet the Evaluator: Bekele Shiferaw discusses the nexus between natural resources and human development
As IEG marked World Day to Combat Desertification and Drought earlier this month, we spoke with Bekele Ambaye Shiferaw, who spent much of his long career focused on environmental degradation and how to stop it. Along with describing his journey to the Independent Evaluation Group, after a 25-year career in development, Bekele spoke to us about the importance of addressing the nexus between Show MoreAs IEG marked World Day to Combat Desertification and Drought earlier this month, we spoke with Bekele Ambaye Shiferaw, who spent much of his long career focused on environmental degradation and how to stop it. Along with describing his journey to the Independent Evaluation Group, after a 25-year career in development, Bekele spoke to us about the importance of addressing the nexus between natural resource degradation and threats to human development, and the way forward. IEG · Meet The Evaluator: Bekele Ambaye Shiferaw

Papua New Guinea - Country Assistance Evaluation

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The report reviews Papua New Guinea's economic and social development in the 1990s and provides a Country Assistance Evaluation on the Bank's contribution to development. Although the Bank helped restore stability in the short term, it was unable to help improve fiscal management. A number of positive steps were taken to improve the nonmineral sector, but a hesitant progress hindered improvements Show MoreThe report reviews Papua New Guinea's economic and social development in the 1990s and provides a Country Assistance Evaluation on the Bank's contribution to development. Although the Bank helped restore stability in the short term, it was unable to help improve fiscal management. A number of positive steps were taken to improve the nonmineral sector, but a hesitant progress hindered improvements in nonmineral production. The process toward social improvement was a difficult one, with only some contributions in education, while poor sector management and weak fiscal policy constrained progress. The Bank stimulated the use of natural resources through positive contributions in the forestry sector, but Bank support requires a high level of ownership of forestry reforms to be effective; sustainability remains uncertain. Building institutional capacity requires effective civil service reform efforts, and although the Bank acknowledged this need, its approach was inadequate. The performance assessment is unsatisfactory due to lost opportunities to accelerate development despite the inflow of mineral revenues and substantial financial and advisory services. Lessons and recommendations suggest the provision of sustained nonlending services and collaboration toward a long-term strategy within the Comprehensive Development Framework.

Mozambique Country Program Evaluation (Approach Paper)

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Mozambique’s recent history is characterized by economic growth, rising inequality, and fragility. After the end of a civil war in 1992, Mozambique enjoyed a sustained period of growth until 2014, positioning it as one of the fastest-growing countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. Such growth, however, was not broadly shared and inequality increased. Fragility in Mozambique traces back to the uneven Show MoreMozambique’s recent history is characterized by economic growth, rising inequality, and fragility. After the end of a civil war in 1992, Mozambique enjoyed a sustained period of growth until 2014, positioning it as one of the fastest-growing countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. Such growth, however, was not broadly shared and inequality increased. Fragility in Mozambique traces back to the uneven historical development of the state, in part shaped by geographical characteristics, and to the nature of the political settlement and the exclusionary political arrangements that it maintains. This evaluation seeks to assess the World Bank Group’s success at helping Mozambique address challenges that constrain its development. The evaluation will cover fiscal years (FY)08–21 and is timed to inform Mozambique’s next Country Partnership Framework (CPF). The evaluation will assess the Bank Group’s support for addressing three development challenges and drivers of fragility in Mozambique: (i) rural poverty linked to weak agricultural productivity and regional inequalities; (ii) weak institutions and governance; and (iii) vulnerability to natural disasters and climate change.

The private sector in low income and fragile countries needs more than credit

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Kitabi Tea Processing Facility A worker sorts the green leaf tea before it reaches the main processing floor. The Kitabi Tea Processing Facility in Kitabi, Rwanda has a capacity of 48 000 tons of green leaf per day. The facility employs 200 people during its peak season and about 70 during the rest of the year. Photo: A'Melody Lee / World Bank
Lessons from the early implementation of the IDA Private Sector Window (PSW)Lessons from the early implementation of the IDA Private Sector Window (PSW)

Malawi - Country Assistance Evaluation

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This Country Assistance Evaluation on Malawi, reviews the Bank ' s assistance between 1991-1997, and discusses the efficacy of its assistance, questioning the effectiveness of macroeconomic policies, and of changes in production, to reflect on broader, more sustainable growth, and poverty reduction. Despite a decade of adjustment, Malawi showed minimal progress by the early 1990s, namely due to Show MoreThis Country Assistance Evaluation on Malawi, reviews the Bank ' s assistance between 1991-1997, and discusses the efficacy of its assistance, questioning the effectiveness of macroeconomic policies, and of changes in production, to reflect on broader, more sustainable growth, and poverty reduction. Despite a decade of adjustment, Malawi showed minimal progress by the early 1990s, namely due to the absence of real change in production structures. The dualistic agriculture sector, in which large estates produced export crops, while small-holders subsistence maize, was largely the remnant of structured price controls, and regulatory restrictions, and, on the other hand, limited industrial production, was due to the constant macroeconomic instability, unattractive investment regulations, poor infrastructure, limited access to finance, and a poor competitive environment, which constrained private activity. The Bank assistance strategy as of the 1990s, aimed at maintaining macroeconomic stability, stimulating private sector activity, while diversifying agriculture. However, adverse external shocks affected strategy implementation, aggravated by unwilling governments to address adversity, limiting results from the Bank ' s assistance. Current emerging progress is substantiated by committed governments, supportive of poverty reduction strategies, though reforms, and institutional weakness calls for attention.

The World Bank Group’s Experience with the IDA Private Sector Window: An Early-Stage Assessment

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Employees of Vita Foam working in Freetown, Sierra Leone on June 19, 2015. Photo © Dominic Chavez/World Bank
This report is an early-stage assessment of the World Bank Group’s experience with the International Development Association (IDA) Private Sector Window (PSW).This report is an early-stage assessment of the World Bank Group’s experience with the International Development Association (IDA) Private Sector Window (PSW).

Managing Urban Spatial Growth

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Contrasting the rapid growth of informal settlements  and high rise buildings in the city of Salvador, Brazil—taken with a drone January 2021—by Johnny Miller / Unequal Scenes
This evaluation offers IEG’s first systematic assessment of the World Bank’s support to the management of urban spatial growth. This evaluation offers IEG’s first systematic assessment of the World Bank’s support to the management of urban spatial growth.