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An Independent Evaluation of the World Bank Group’s Support to Mexico (2008–17)

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An Independent Evaluation of the World Bank Group’s Support to Mexico
This evaluation assesses the development effectiveness of the World Bank Group’s country program in Mexico between 2008 and 2017.This evaluation assesses the development effectiveness of the World Bank Group’s country program in Mexico between 2008 and 2017.

Inclusive Growth: A Synthesis of Findings from Recent IEG Evaluations

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Inclusive Growth: A Synthesis of Findings from Recent IEG Evaluations
This report extracts findings and distills lessons from all relevant IEG evaluations completed between FY10 and FY18 to shed light on the nature and results of the Bank Group’s support in key areas of inclusive growth. This report extracts findings and distills lessons from all relevant IEG evaluations completed between FY10 and FY18 to shed light on the nature and results of the Bank Group’s support in key areas of inclusive growth.

Engaging Citizens for Better Development Results

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Engaging Citizens for Better Development Results
This evaluation assesses how effectively the World Bank Group has mainstreamed citizen engagement at the project, country, and corporate levels, and demonstrates how this process contributes to the achievement of development outcomes.This evaluation assesses how effectively the World Bank Group has mainstreamed citizen engagement at the project, country, and corporate levels, and demonstrates how this process contributes to the achievement of development outcomes.

India CLR Review FY13-17

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This review of the India Completion and Learning Report of the World Bank Group (WBG) Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) covers the CPS period, FY13-FY17, including the CPS Performance and Learning Review (PLR) of September 2, 2015.The overarching goals of the WBG's CPS for India were to help the country accelerate poverty reduction and increase shared prosperity. The CPS was aligned with the Show MoreThis review of the India Completion and Learning Report of the World Bank Group (WBG) Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) covers the CPS period, FY13-FY17, including the CPS Performance and Learning Review (PLR) of September 2, 2015.The overarching goals of the WBG's CPS for India were to help the country accelerate poverty reduction and increase shared prosperity. The CPS was aligned with the government's Twelfth Five Year Plan (2012-2017), which sought high levels of economic growth and prioritized inclusiveness from several perspectives—poverty reduction, group equality, regional balance, and empowerment. The CPS organized its program around three engagement areas (or focus areas): (i) Integration with focus on physical connectivity to improve India's domestic, regional and global integration; (ii) Transformation by facilitating spatial transformation from rural to urban areas and benefitting from agglomeration economies, raising agricultural productivity and encouraging off-farm employment; and (iii) Inclusion by enhancing services in health, nutrition, education and social programs for the disadvantaged groups. The CPS had three cross-cutting themes of governance, environmental sustainability and gender equality which were envisaged to be embedded across the three engagement areas. The CPS committed to allocate 60 percent of the new commitments during the CPS directly to the states, of which half (30 percent) would go to the Low-Income States (LIS) and Special Category States (SCS).The government elected in May 2014 emphasized reforms to promote growth while maintaining attention to inclusion. The government and the WBG agreed to a narrow set of eight priorities to guide the work forward. These eight priorities could have provided the opportunity to consolidate the program interventions and sharpen the results framework. At the PLR, however, the CPS original program objectives remained virtually unchanged. The WBG responded to the new priorities by scaling up its lending and ASA; in effect, broadening the scope of its engagement in India beyond the original design. IEG concurs with key CLR lessons summarized as follows: i) expanding engagement in LIS/SCS requires significant time and resources; (ii) WBG activities in states were characterized by individual sector operations with limited integration, making the sum of engagement less than the parts; (iii) national-level operations supporting GoI Centrally Sponsored Schemes (CSS) were generally effective for scaling up impact and engaging on policy but often had implementation challenges; (iv) the World Bank's ability to support systemic improvements through operations depended on the long-term partnership in the sector more than the amount of financing; (v) an increase in operations with Results Based Frameworks (RBF) during the CPS period appeared to promise stronger impact, but these operations need to ensure that the M&E systems to trigger disbursements are thoroughly developed; and (vi) examples of cross-sectoral operations providing a more holistic approach need to be expanded further.

IEG Annual Report 2018: Growing our Influence

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IEG Annual Report 2018: Growing our Influence
In FY18, IEG set out a strategy to align with the World Bank Group’s priorities, undertook a series of reforms to improve evaluations and their implementation, and continued to grow its influence in several arenas.In FY18, IEG set out a strategy to align with the World Bank Group’s priorities, undertook a series of reforms to improve evaluations and their implementation, and continued to grow its influence in several arenas.

Rwanda: Fourth Poverty Reduction Strategy Grant, Fifth Poverty Reduction Support Grant, Sixth Poverty Reduction Support Grant, and Seventh Poverty Reduction Support Financing

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This Project Performance Assessment Report evaluates a programmatic series of four development policy financing (DPF) operations approved for Rwanda over 2008–11. The series consisted of four single-tranche operations: the fourth, fifth, and sixth Poverty Reduction Support Grants (PRSGs), approved in March 2008, 2009, and 2010, respectively, and a seventh Poverty Reduction Support Financing Show MoreThis Project Performance Assessment Report evaluates a programmatic series of four development policy financing (DPF) operations approved for Rwanda over 2008–11. The series consisted of four single-tranche operations: the fourth, fifth, and sixth Poverty Reduction Support Grants (PRSGs), approved in March 2008, 2009, and 2010, respectively, and a seventh Poverty Reduction Support Financing operation (PRSF-7, a combination of grant and credit financing) approved in February 2011. The purpose of the PPAR is to examine the extent to which the series achieved its relevant program development objectives and how well the associated outcomes have been sustained since the series’ closure. In addition to its accountability and lesson learning functions, the PPAR provided inputs to the Independent Evaluation Group’s (IEG) fiscal years (FY) 09–17 Country Program Evaluation for Rwanda. Ratings for this project are as follows: Outcome was moderately satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was moderate, Bank performance was moderately satisfactory, and Borrower performance was moderately satisfactory. Key lessons from the experience of PRSF 4-7 include: (i) Programmatic DPF can be an effective form of support for a well-defined, country-owned reform program. (ii) It is difficult to be definitive about the efficacy of a DPF series unless the results framework is tight-knit, the reforms supported have the requisite depth, and there is a strong and direct causal link between these reforms and the outcomes sought. (iii) A commitment to providing regular, predictable financing in the form of (multisector) general budget support operations implies that the World Bank needs to be prepared to accommodate dilution or deferral of reform content relative to what is foreseen at the outset. (iv) The World Bank can face a hard choice between adhering to a CPAF in a multisector budget support series and fulfilling the good-practice prescriptions in its operational policy for DPF. (v) Successful deployment of an integrated financial management information system can be facilitated by high-level commitment and performance monitoring, sustained external support, and system ownership.

Papua New Guinea: Smallholder Agriculture Development Project (PPAR)

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Papua and New Guinea (Papua New Guinea) has faced considerable development challenges since its independence in 1975. Through the Smallholder Agriculture Development Project, the World Bank sought to improve community participation in rural areas by supporting the already-established local palm oil production industry. The objective of SADP in the financing agreement (July 2008) was to increase, Show MorePapua and New Guinea (Papua New Guinea) has faced considerable development challenges since its independence in 1975. Through the Smallholder Agriculture Development Project, the World Bank sought to improve community participation in rural areas by supporting the already-established local palm oil production industry. The objective of SADP in the financing agreement (July 2008) was to increase, in a sustainable manner, the level of involvement of targeted communities in their local development through measures aimed at increasing oil palm revenue and local participation. Ratings for the Smallholder Agriculture Development Project are as follows: Outcome was unsatisfactory, Risk to development outcome was high, Bank performance was moderately unsatisfactory, and Borrower performance was unsatisfactory. Lessons from the project include: (i) Projects that seek to improve crop productivity and income on smallholder farms, in addition to CDD, work better when they integrate the two disparate objectives because of the very different implementation modalities involved. (ii) Complex, multidimensional projects require additional oversight and support in environments with weak government implementation capacity. (iii) Creative operational approaches or sufficient institutional support is required in weak-capacity environments to ensure that project disbursements are distributed effectively. (iv) Understanding cultural impacts and how they influence agricultural cash crops in smaller, geographically isolated states is necessary to ensure that political constraints do not reduce the impact of World Bank projects. (v) Agricultural sector road infrastructure investments need to be coordinated sufficiently with domestic private-sector interests and provincial government priorities to ensure sustainability and future operational maintenance.

Turkey: Istanbul Seismic Risk Mitigation and Emergency Preparedness Project (PPAR) (Turkish version)

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This version of the PPAR report has been translated to Turkish. Turkey faces high vulnerability to earthquakes, with Istanbul posing the most serious risk due its high seismic risk and its role as the population and economic center of Turkey. A major earthquake near Istanbul in 1999 led to over 17,000 deaths and damage estimated at $US 5-13 billion. The World Bank supported a post-earthquake Show MoreThis version of the PPAR report has been translated to Turkish. Turkey faces high vulnerability to earthquakes, with Istanbul posing the most serious risk due its high seismic risk and its role as the population and economic center of Turkey. A major earthquake near Istanbul in 1999 led to over 17,000 deaths and damage estimated at $US 5-13 billion. The World Bank supported a post-earthquake reconstruction project over 1999-2006, but vulnerability to earthquakes remained high, especially for Istanbul. A major earthquake in Istanbul would be catastrophic, and could derail the country’s development trajectory. The government was committed to undertaking disaster risk mitigation, but needed external assistance and support to do so. The World Bank was a suitable partner based on its financing capacity, technical expertise in disaster risk management and mitigation, and credibility and trust in Turkey based on prior disaster risk management engagements. These considerations motivated the creation of the Istanbul Seismic Risk Mitigation and Emergency Preparedness Project (ISMEP) as a proactive risk mitigation effort. Ratings for the Istanbul Seismic Risk Mitigation and Emergency Preparedness Project are as follows: Outcome is highly satisfactory, Risk to development outcome is negligible, Bank performance is satisfactory, and Borrower performance is highly satisfactory. The project offers the following lessons: (i) A sub-national multisector model can be highly effective for reducing disaster risk in a well-functioning major metropolitan area, even in a country where these approaches are unusual. (ii) A semi-autonomous professional project coordination unit can help to ensure effective and efficient project implementation even when dealing with many stakeholders and beneficiary agencies. (iii) Even highly successful project models may not be replicated if they cannot generate strong government ownership and if they rely on exceptional measures. (iv) The World Bank can achieve large scale impact by creating effective project platforms that are able to attract additional financing from other institutions. (v) The World Bank can offer significant value to clients from financing, access to technology, project management experience, and influence - even in megacities in high capacity upper middle-income countries. (vi) Pilot efforts may not support learning if they do not have monitoring and evaluation systems that assess their contribution to program objectives and draw conclusions for the design of future interventions. (vii) Small grants to support municipalities in digitizing their processes can have a significant impact on efficiency and transparency if coupled with highly motivated municipal leadership.

Rwanda: Quality of Decentralized Service Delivery Support Development Policy Operation (PPAR)

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This Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) assesses the Rwanda Quality of Decentralized Service Delivery Support Development Policy Operation, in the amount of $50 million, which was approved by the Board of Executive Directors on May 14, 2013 and closed as scheduled on June 30, 2014. The purpose of the PPAR is to examine the extent to which this development policy operation achieved its Show MoreThis Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) assesses the Rwanda Quality of Decentralized Service Delivery Support Development Policy Operation, in the amount of $50 million, which was approved by the Board of Executive Directors on May 14, 2013 and closed as scheduled on June 30, 2014. The purpose of the PPAR is to examine the extent to which this development policy operation achieved its relevant objectives and the sustainability of outcomes after project closure. In addition to its accountability and lesson-learning functions, the PPAR provided input for IEG’s Country Program Evaluation for Rwanda for fiscal years 2009–17. It will also serve the purpose of providing input to an upcoming IEG thematic evaluation on strengthening subnational governments. Ratings for this project are as follows: World Bank’s financial contribution was satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was moderate, Bank performance was satisfactory, and Government performance was satisfactory. The following lessons are drawn from the design and implementation of the program: (i) Strong government ownership and leadership of the reform agenda are important drivers of successful development policy financing. (ii) Rollout of an IFMIS at the local government level can serve as a useful catalyst and vehicle for enhancing local capacity. (iii) Flexibility, agility, and strategic acumen on the World Bank’s part can play a valuable role in resolving a financing impasse that threatens to jeopardize development gains. (iv) In designing a DPO, there may be a trade-off between speed of response and value-added in terms of leveraging reforms.

IEG Review of Results and Performance of the World Bank Group 2018 With a Special Focus on Inclusive Growth (Concept Note)

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Results and Performance of the World Bank Group (RAP) is the annual review of what IEG evaluations (and validation work) reveal about the development effectiveness of the World Bank Group (WBG), which includes IBRD/IDA, IFC, and MIGA. The report synthesizes evidence from IEG evaluations, validations, and learning products complemented by relevant information from other sources (e.g., WBG Show MoreResults and Performance of the World Bank Group (RAP) is the annual review of what IEG evaluations (and validation work) reveal about the development effectiveness of the World Bank Group (WBG), which includes IBRD/IDA, IFC, and MIGA. The report synthesizes evidence from IEG evaluations, validations, and learning products complemented by relevant information from other sources (e.g., WBG corporate documents). RAP 2018 will be the ninth in a series that began in 2010 with the consolidation of separate annual reports that IEG prepared for the World Bank (IBRD/IDA), IFC, and MIGA, and it will be the sixth one since IEG adopted the approach of focusing one of the RAP chapters on a specific theme. Like recent RAPs, RAP 2018 will have three main chapters. The first chapter will be dedicated to the special theme for RAP 2018, Inclusive Growth. The second and core chapter will report on the results and performance of the most recent cohorts of WBG projects. The third chapter will be devoted to the Management Action Record (MAR) and review the degree to which Management’s action plans prepared in response to IEG’s recommendations from major thematic, corporate and sector evaluations have been implemented, with a specific look at recommendations that relate to inclusive growth.