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Disruptive Technology and Inclusive Development – What Works?

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Disruptive Technology and Inclusive Development – What Works?
This 2018 World Bank Annual Meetings session explored how countries can harness the power of disruptive technologies, while mitigating the risks.This 2018 World Bank Annual Meetings session explored how countries can harness the power of disruptive technologies, while mitigating the risks.

What does Evaluation tell us about how to Harness Disruptive Technologies for Development?

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How to Harness Disruptive Technologies for Development
IEG has mined past evaluations for insights as to how the World Bank Group can ensure that disruptive technologies are harnessed in an inclusive way.IEG has mined past evaluations for insights as to how the World Bank Group can ensure that disruptive technologies are harnessed in an inclusive way.

How is the World Bank Group Supporting Environmental Sustainability?

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How is the World Bank Group Supporting Environmental Sustainability?
A discussion and debate about what more the World Bank Group needs to do to ensure environmental sustainability.A discussion and debate about what more the World Bank Group needs to do to ensure environmental sustainability.

India CLR Review FY13-17

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This review of the India Completion and Learning Report of the World Bank Group (WBG) Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) covers the CPS period, FY13-FY17, including the CPS Performance and Learning Review (PLR) of September 2, 2015.The overarching goals of the WBG's CPS for India were to help the country accelerate poverty reduction and increase shared prosperity. The CPS was aligned with the Show MoreThis review of the India Completion and Learning Report of the World Bank Group (WBG) Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) covers the CPS period, FY13-FY17, including the CPS Performance and Learning Review (PLR) of September 2, 2015.The overarching goals of the WBG's CPS for India were to help the country accelerate poverty reduction and increase shared prosperity. The CPS was aligned with the government's Twelfth Five Year Plan (2012-2017), which sought high levels of economic growth and prioritized inclusiveness from several perspectives—poverty reduction, group equality, regional balance, and empowerment. The CPS organized its program around three engagement areas (or focus areas): (i) Integration with focus on physical connectivity to improve India's domestic, regional and global integration; (ii) Transformation by facilitating spatial transformation from rural to urban areas and benefitting from agglomeration economies, raising agricultural productivity and encouraging off-farm employment; and (iii) Inclusion by enhancing services in health, nutrition, education and social programs for the disadvantaged groups. The CPS had three cross-cutting themes of governance, environmental sustainability and gender equality which were envisaged to be embedded across the three engagement areas. The CPS committed to allocate 60 percent of the new commitments during the CPS directly to the states, of which half (30 percent) would go to the Low-Income States (LIS) and Special Category States (SCS).The government elected in May 2014 emphasized reforms to promote growth while maintaining attention to inclusion. The government and the WBG agreed to a narrow set of eight priorities to guide the work forward. These eight priorities could have provided the opportunity to consolidate the program interventions and sharpen the results framework. At the PLR, however, the CPS original program objectives remained virtually unchanged. The WBG responded to the new priorities by scaling up its lending and ASA; in effect, broadening the scope of its engagement in India beyond the original design. IEG concurs with key CLR lessons summarized as follows: i) expanding engagement in LIS/SCS requires significant time and resources; (ii) WBG activities in states were characterized by individual sector operations with limited integration, making the sum of engagement less than the parts; (iii) national-level operations supporting GoI Centrally Sponsored Schemes (CSS) were generally effective for scaling up impact and engaging on policy but often had implementation challenges; (iv) the World Bank's ability to support systemic improvements through operations depended on the long-term partnership in the sector more than the amount of financing; (v) an increase in operations with Results Based Frameworks (RBF) during the CPS period appeared to promise stronger impact, but these operations need to ensure that the M&E systems to trigger disbursements are thoroughly developed; and (vi) examples of cross-sectoral operations providing a more holistic approach need to be expanded further.

The Future of Higher Education: Four Critical Questions for Policymakers in Developing Countries

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The Future of Higher Education
The rapid increase in demand for higher education raises important questions for developing countries and other stakeholders engaged in the higher education sector.The rapid increase in demand for higher education raises important questions for developing countries and other stakeholders engaged in the higher education sector.

Engaging Citizens for Better Development Results

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Engaging Citizens for Better Development Results
This evaluation assesses how effectively the World Bank Group has mainstreamed citizen engagement at the project, country, and corporate levels, and demonstrates how this process contributes to the achievement of development outcomes.This evaluation assesses how effectively the World Bank Group has mainstreamed citizen engagement at the project, country, and corporate levels, and demonstrates how this process contributes to the achievement of development outcomes.

IEG Annual Report 2018: Growing our Influence

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IEG Annual Report 2018: Growing our Influence
In FY18, IEG set out a strategy to align with the World Bank Group’s priorities, undertook a series of reforms to improve evaluations and their implementation, and continued to grow its influence in several arenas.In FY18, IEG set out a strategy to align with the World Bank Group’s priorities, undertook a series of reforms to improve evaluations and their implementation, and continued to grow its influence in several arenas.

In Conclusion…

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In Conclusion
The third and final post of IEG Director General Caroline Heider's retrospective.The third and final post of IEG Director General Caroline Heider's retrospective.

Boosting Market Confidence to Support Key Development Efforts: Three Lessons from Indonesia

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Boosting Market Confidence to Support Key Development Efforts
This brief captures the lessons from evaluating the World Bank’s Public Expenditure Support Facility (DPL-DDO) in Indonesia. This brief captures the lessons from evaluating the World Bank’s Public Expenditure Support Facility (DPL-DDO) in Indonesia.

The Three Pillars of a Working Evaluation Function: IEG's Experience

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The Three Pillars of a Working Evaluation Function
The second in a 3-part retrospective series by Director General Caroline Heider.The second in a 3-part retrospective series by Director General Caroline Heider.