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Rethinking Evaluation— Is Relevance Still Relevant?

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Rethinking Evaluation— Is Relevance Still Relevant?
Meeting the bar for relevance is not all that hard, so should it be replaced with something more suited to a complex development environment?Meeting the bar for relevance is not all that hard, so should it be replaced with something more suited to a complex development environment?

Senegal: A Decade of World Bank Support to Senegal’s Nutrition Program

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This report assesses the performance of three projects: (1) the Nutrition Enhancement Program, (2) the Nutrition Enhancement Project in Support of the Second Phase of the Nutrition Enhancement Program, and (3) the Rapid Response Child-Focused Social Cash Transfer and Nutrition Security Project. At the start of the new millennium, malnutrition in Senegal was of great concern. Malnutrition Show MoreThis report assesses the performance of three projects: (1) the Nutrition Enhancement Program, (2) the Nutrition Enhancement Project in Support of the Second Phase of the Nutrition Enhancement Program, and (3) the Rapid Response Child-Focused Social Cash Transfer and Nutrition Security Project. At the start of the new millennium, malnutrition in Senegal was of great concern. Malnutrition contributes to child and maternal mortality and morbidity, undermines children’s prospects of reaching their physical and intellectual potential, and undercuts income-earning potential for households and overall productivity and economic development. Its two principal causes are inadequate food intake and illness. Underlying factors are poverty; inadequate access to quality food; inadequate knowledge and behaviors favoring the health of mothers and children; and inadequate services, especially health, clean water, and sanitation. In 2001, the government of Senegal issued a new nutrition policy, supporting a 10-year goal to improve nutrition through a community-based, multisectoral approach. The policy was translated into the 10-year Nutrition Enhancement Program (NEP), financed by the government of Senegal, the World Bank, and eventually others. The government of Senegal also created the Cellule de Lutte contre la Malnutrition (Agency in Charge of the Fight against Malnutrition; CLM), attached to the prime minister’s office, responsible for policy oversight and evaluation.

2016 Top 10 Contents

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Our work focuses on what the World Bank Group delivers and achieves in partnership with its client countries. Evaluations published during 2016 covered the support that the World Bank Group provides to groups of client countries, the WBG’s work on issues that affect how inclusive growth is such jobs and industrial competitiveness, and the WBG’s support to human development and the environment. Show MoreOur work focuses on what the World Bank Group delivers and achieves in partnership with its client countries. Evaluations published during 2016 covered the support that the World Bank Group provides to groups of client countries, the WBG’s work on issues that affect how inclusive growth is such jobs and industrial competitiveness, and the WBG’s support to human development and the environment. These are the 10 most popular 2016 IEG contents: Supporting Transformational Change for Poverty Reduction and Shared Prosperity Transformational engagements are a critical pillar of the 2013 World Bank Group'€™s strategy for achieving its twin goals of extreme poverty elimination and shared prosperity. The Independent Evaluation Group has reviewed existing evaluative evidence for a diverse group of Bank Group interventions to understand the mechanisms and conditions for transformational engagements and to distill lessons and implications for the World Bank Group if it wants to rely on such engagements to more effectively pursue its goals.   Influencing Change through Evaluation: What is the Theory of Change? In the case of the World Bank Group, IEG have seen a correlation in World Bank Group projects between strong results-based management (results frameworks, M&E, work quality at entry and during supervision) and good outcome ratings. What explains that correlation? Does the theory of change apply to our work? If so, how?   World Bank Group Engagement in Small States This clustered Country Program Evaluation (CPE) concerns small states (defined as those that have a population of less than 1.5 million) and is the second in a new IEG product series. Though small states differ widely, they share several challenges, including those of strengthening their resilience to economic and natural disaster-related shocks and of remaining competitive to generate vigorous economic growth.   Industrial Competitiveness and Jobs Industry competitiveness can be enhanced through several different approaches including economy wide, industry specific, or a mix of economy wide with industry specific. This evaluation focuses on industry specific support and on four industries - agriculture, manufacturing, tourism, and information and communication technology.   World Bank Group Engagement in Resource-Rich Developing Countries There is strong learning potential in looking across a group of countries that have one common characteristic. IEG has looked at four countries that have rich endowment with and dependence on non-renewable natural resources: the Plurinational State of Bolivia, Kazakhstan, Mongolia, and Zambia. These countries are otherwise fairly heterogeneous in terms of geographic location, income levels, and depth of dialogue with the World Bank Group.   Program for Results: An Early Stage Assessment of the Process and Effects of a New Lending Instrument This evaluation assesses the early experience with the design and implementation of Program for Results (PforR) operations and identifies lessons and recommendations to strengthen this new instrument.   World Bank Group Engagement in Situations of Fragility, Conflict, and Violence The prevalence of incidents of violent conflict in middle-income countries (MICs) today has meant that the development community's perception of conflict and violence is no longer primarily associated with low-income countries. This evaluation follows the recent evaluation of World Bank Group activities in low-income countries classified as fragile and conflict-affected (FCS) to focus on countries that are not classified as FCS and experiencing localized or externally imposed situations of fragility, conflict, and violence (FCV).   Results and Performance of the World Bank Group (RAP) 2015 The report also examines how effectively the World Bank Group addressed current and emerging development challenges, as well as evaluates World Bank Group's portfolio, country programs, and system for monitoring the implementation of IEG's recommendations. This year's RAP focuses on gender integration in World Bank Group operations.   Why IDA Matters and How to Realize its Full Potential - An Evaluator's Take Is the World Bank Group doing enough in IDA countries and what lessons can we draw from the Bank Group’s performance to date?    

Rethinking Evaluation – Have we had enough of R/E/E/I/S?

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Rethinking Evaluation – Have we had enough of R/E/E/I/S?
After nearly 15 years of adhering to the DAC evaluation criteria, is it time for a rethink? After nearly 15 years of adhering to the DAC evaluation criteria, is it time for a rethink?

Policy Coherence and the Sustainable Development Goals – What Can Evaluation Do About It?

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Policy Coherence and the Sustainable Development Goals – What Can Evaluation Do About It?
Evaluating progress towards the SDGs will provide opportunities to evaluate policy coherence as well.Evaluating progress towards the SDGs will provide opportunities to evaluate policy coherence as well.

Financing the SDGs: The Role of Capital Markets?

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Join our panel of experts in discussing potential strategies for how the development community can tap Capital Markets more effectively, drawing on recent lessons, including the WBG’s experience with supporting capital market development over the last ten years. Join our panel of experts in discussing potential strategies for how the development community can tap Capital Markets more effectively, drawing on recent lessons, including the WBG’s experience with supporting capital market development over the last ten years.

Colombia: Public and Private Paths to Sustainable Water Supply and Sanitation in Colombia (1999-2011) (Project Performance Assessment Report)

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Water supply and sanitation in Colombia have improved in recent decades. Between 1990 and 2010, access to improved sanitation increased from 67 percent to 82 percent, and access to improved water sources increased from 89 percent to 94 percent (WHO/UNICEF 2010), but coverage in rural areas still lags behind. The three projects covered by this assessment—the Cartagena Water Supply, Sewerage, Show MoreWater supply and sanitation in Colombia have improved in recent decades. Between 1990 and 2010, access to improved sanitation increased from 67 percent to 82 percent, and access to improved water sources increased from 89 percent to 94 percent (WHO/UNICEF 2010), but coverage in rural areas still lags behind. The three projects covered by this assessment—the Cartagena Water Supply, Sewerage, and Environmental Management Project (the Cartagena Project); the Water Sector Reform Assistance Project (WSRAP); and the Water and Sanitation Sector Support Project (WSSSP)—are among the second generation of water supply and sanitation (WSS) projects that benefited from the lessons learned in the 1990s from Bank-supported WSS projects in Colombia. The overall project outcome, based on relevance, efficacy, and efficiency, is rated satisfactory. Relevance of the objectives and design are both rated substantial. Achievement of two objectives was rated high, and one was rated substantial, since all objectives were achieved or surpassed. Efficiency is rated substantial, and risks to development outcome are rated negligible, since ACUACAR had proven to be an efficient and sustainable mixed-enterprise (public-private) model that survived numerous shifts in political administrations. Both Bank and borrower performances are rated satisfactory.

Zambia: Water Sector Performance Improvement Project

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This Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) assesses the development effectiveness of the Water Sector Performance Improvement Project (WSPIP) in Zambia. The project’s original objectives were: (i) the improvement of access to, and sustainability of, the water supply and sanitation services for consumers in Lusaka; and (ii) development of a comprehensive institutional structure Show MoreThis Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) assesses the development effectiveness of the Water Sector Performance Improvement Project (WSPIP) in Zambia. The project’s original objectives were: (i) the improvement of access to, and sustainability of, the water supply and sanitation services for consumers in Lusaka; and (ii) development of a comprehensive institutional structure supporting a coordinated approach to water supply and sanitation investments. In 2009, Additional Financing was approved, and the objectives were revised to (i) improve the technical efficiency and financial sustainability of Lusaka Water and Sanitation Company and improve access to water supply and sanitation services for urban consumers in Lusaka, Kafue, Chongwe, and Luangwa districts, and (ii) strengthen the effectiveness of national water supply and sanitation planning.

#WhatWorked in 2016 - An Evaluator's Take

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#WhatWorked in 2016 - An Evaluator's Take
A reflection on IEG's most-read #WhatWorks posts. Tell us what you'd like to see in 2017 in the comments below.A reflection on IEG's most-read #WhatWorks posts. Tell us what you'd like to see in 2017 in the comments below.

Solomon Islands: Rural Development Program (PPAR)

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The Solomon Islands Rural Development Program (Phase I) was the Bank’s first major intervention in Solomon Islands following the Tensions of 1998-2003. The project envisaged making the government more visible in rural areas of the archipelago and sought to re-energize commercial activity and opportunities for agricultural producers. The project’s objective was to take a community driven Show MoreThe Solomon Islands Rural Development Program (Phase I) was the Bank’s first major intervention in Solomon Islands following the Tensions of 1998-2003. The project envisaged making the government more visible in rural areas of the archipelago and sought to re-energize commercial activity and opportunities for agricultural producers. The project’s objective was to take a community driven development (CDD) approach to supporting rural infrastructure and to put in place the necessary structures for CDD to be a useful mechanism for future development.