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Evaluation Capacity Development

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evaluation capacity development topic
Monitoring and Evaluation: A Closer Look Monitoring -Involves continuous or ongoing collection and analysis of information about implementation to review progress; -Compares actual progress with what was planned so that adjustments can be made in implementation; and -Is an internal activity that is the responsibility of those who manage implementation procedures, thus representing  a Show More Monitoring and Evaluation: A Closer Look Monitoring -Involves continuous or ongoing collection and analysis of information about implementation to review progress; -Compares actual progress with what was planned so that adjustments can be made in implementation; and -Is an internal activity that is the responsibility of those who manage implementation procedures, thus representing  a good management practice. Evaluation -Is a periodic assessment of the relevance, efficiency, effectiveness, impact, and/or sustainability of an activity or intervention; -Is a systematic search for answers about an intervention (project, program, or policy); and -Measures the effects of an intervention and compares them with the goals and objectives of the intervention. Evaluation Capacity Development (ECD) efforts strengthen and sustain both individuals and organizations to: Access, build, and implement evaluative knowledge and skills; Design, implement, and manage effective evaluation processes and findings; and Use evaluations as a performance improvement tool. By cultivating a spirit of continual learning and capacity development, organizations are able to guide their own team members, stakeholders, and others along a more direct path to program effectiveness and accountability.  ECD also fosters the implementation of Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) knowledge and practices. M&E, an essential component of results-based management, provides information for designing, implementing, and assessing the results of government, civil society, and private sector policies, programs, and projects.  Used well, M&E can help policymakers and program managers determine what works, what is not working, and why.  M&E in the public sector can also: Support evidence-based policymaking, particularly in the context of national budget cycle and national planning;   Guide ministries and agencies in managing activities at the sector, program, and project levels, including service delivery to beneficiaries; and Enhance accountability and transparency.   UPDATE: International Program for Development Evaluation Training (IPDET): Note: Announcement Regarding important developments related to the International Program for Development Evaluation Training from IEG Director General Caroline Heider Upcoming Evaluation Training Management and delivery of the International Program for Development Evaluation Training (IPDET) 2.0 The Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) of the World Bank Group is seeking a dynamic academic partner with vision and expertise to grow and lead the International program for Development Evaluation Training (IPDET) Program. For the first time in 15 years, IEG is offering the opportunity to academic institutions to be part of this well-known Program and act as a lead partner in rolling out IPDET 2.0. With over 2,600 alumni from 161 countries, IPDET has made an important contribution to global evaluation capacity. The delivery of IPDET has been showing a recurring pattern of success and a high level of effectiveness since the first course offering in 2001. Please find the link to the listing of the announcement HERE in case you are interested to receive the solicitation. CLEAR Center Training Schedule View the list of upcoming evaluation training sessions at regional CLEAR centers.

What to Evaluate When - Consider These Choices Early in the Evaluation Cycle

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What to Evaluate When - Consider These Choices Early in the Evaluation Cycle
Consider these choices early in the evaluation cycle.Consider these choices early in the evaluation cycle.

IEG LIVE: Why Focus on Results When No One Uses Them? Towards Useful Evaluations

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A lively conversation among leaders in development about producing and using evaluations and putting countries on pathways to evidence-based decision-making. The session was hosted by the Independent Evaluation Group in partnership with the International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3ie) and the World Bank Group’s Governance Global Practice.A lively conversation among leaders in development about producing and using evaluations and putting countries on pathways to evidence-based decision-making. The session was hosted by the Independent Evaluation Group in partnership with the International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3ie) and the World Bank Group’s Governance Global Practice.

The Mystery of Mixing Methods

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The Mystery of Mixing Evaluation Methods
Despite significant progress on mixed methods approaches, their application continues to be (partly) shrouded in mystery, and the concept itself can be subject to misuse.Despite significant progress on mixed methods approaches, their application continues to be (partly) shrouded in mystery, and the concept itself can be subject to misuse.

Conversations: Making Evaluation Work for the World Bank, the African Development Bank, and Beyond

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Conversations: Making Evaluation Work for the World Bank
Caroline Heider, Director General, Evaluation of the World Bank Group and Rakesh Nangia, Evaluator General of the African Development Bank, explore the role of independent evaluation in their respective institutions, and some of the key issues they have encountered. Caroline Heider, Director General, Evaluation of the World Bank Group and Rakesh Nangia, Evaluator General of the African Development Bank, explore the role of independent evaluation in their respective institutions, and some of the key issues they have encountered.

Using Evaluation to Enhance the Performance of Development Partnerships

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Using Evaluation to Enhance the Performance of Development Partnerships
What do we know about the performance of partnership programs, and how can evaluation enhance their effectiveness? What do we know about the performance of partnership programs, and how can evaluation enhance their effectiveness?

How can development partners meet the huge demand for evaluation capacity?

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How can development partners meet the huge demand for evaluation capacity?
The CLEAR Initiative is a multi-donor program that takes a unique, and scalable, approach to meeting the growing demand for evaluation capacity development in developing countries.The CLEAR Initiative is a multi-donor program that takes a unique, and scalable, approach to meeting the growing demand for evaluation capacity development in developing countries.

Four Ways to Get it Right During the Evaluation Process

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Four Ways to Get it Right During the Evaluation Process
Ultimately, the value of an evaluation lies in it being used. For that to happen evaluation and its underlying design and process have to be credible, timely, and useful. Ultimately, the value of an evaluation lies in it being used. For that to happen evaluation and its underlying design and process have to be credible, timely, and useful.

How complicated does the (Intervention) Model have to be?

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How complicated does the (Intervention) Model have to be?
Even though simple models are incomplete and inadequate for some questions, more elaborate models are not necessarily generating more accurate predictions or explanations of reality.Even though simple models are incomplete and inadequate for some questions, more elaborate models are not necessarily generating more accurate predictions or explanations of reality.

Evaluation Capacity: Who Needs It?

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Who needs evaluation capacity? Years ago the answer to this question would have been the donor community.  This situation has changed dramatically in the last couple of years. Many more countries are setting up evaluation offices as part of their own systems. They – from governments to citizens – want to know how well policies and programs work, whether funded by an external donor or Show MoreWho needs evaluation capacity? Years ago the answer to this question would have been the donor community.  This situation has changed dramatically in the last couple of years. Many more countries are setting up evaluation offices as part of their own systems. They – from governments to citizens – want to know how well policies and programs work, whether funded by an external donor or government revenues. This trend was evident at the Fourth Global Forum of the Regional Centers for Learning on Evaluation and Results (CLEAR) Initiative in Mexico City, where I had the privilege to meet and share ideas with leaders from around the world about their ambition to build evaluation into their systems for managing public sector service delivery, finance, and beyond. It is a demonstration that governments recognize the importance of evidence and greater understanding of development processes. With a capacity to evaluate, countries are able to make better informed decisions – including taking calculated risks – about the management of the public sector as a whole and public finance in particular. Evaluation contributes to increased ownership of development processes, responsible governance, and timely corrective action when policies, programs, or institutions do not perform at their best. Country  ownership and  evaluation champions are essential for the process of developing evaluation capacity. These champions can be policy-makers who see the true value of evidence in the decision-making and evaluators as the interlocutors with policy and decision-makers in their countries. They will ensure that evaluation focuses on priority needs and that it is taken into account. Champions are also essential for engaging with the many agencies that aim to develop evaluation capacities identifying the bottlenecks and the additional needs for support. They are the drivers of networks where leaders of strong evaluation functions reach out to debate each other’s challenges and solutions, as well as include peers in countries that just started their journeys in the evaluation capacity world. Developing capacity involves a diagnostic process that is driven by those local champions. They should be able to call on other leaders in a similar situation and in the evaluation community to help them identify capacity needs and determine gaps and ways to close them, just as took place at the South-South Roundtable in Johannesburg that brought together leaders  from Argentina. Benin, Brazil, Colombia, Chile, Costa Rica, Guatemala, El Salvador, Niger, South Africa and Zambia. Their ownership is essential for creating a shared vision, clear goals and targets, and a monitored, adaptable implementation plan. Implementation will involve typical elements of training, expert advice, and other inputs, and increasingly dialogue among leaders to develop: the enabling environment, which both sets the policy or authorizing context and signals demand for evaluation,   the institutions, which require they understand their clients, develop services, methods systems, and the human, technical, and financial resources to deliver services, and   people, who need skills, knowledge, and networks to perform at their best. In recent years the number of evaluation capacity development efforts has exploded. The good news: more attention, more resources. The challenge: generating more and better synergies between these efforts so that they collectively produce more than the parts can deliver individually. Groups like the Development Assistance Cooperation Evaluation Network of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development  and  initiatives like CLEAR or EvalPartners rally diverse stakeholders around a common goal, which is a good start. How else to support these efforts? Fostering an enabling environment for evaluation can take place through dialogue among high-level decision makers and evaluators to increase awareness of and demand for evidence from evaluation. Building evaluation into public sector/finance management programs would give a strong impetus to an enabling environment that asks for and uses critical evaluation findings. Developing institutions. Take project-related Monitoring and Evaluation units:  instead of developing these units as part of a project management structure, they could be used as a platform for developing institutional evaluation capacities as an integral part of the government’s public administration. These units, situated in line ministries, when networked with the national statistical offices would form part of an institutionalized system that generates monitoring and evaluation data for all government investments rather than projects, and feed information into the national statistic system. In addition,  it is important to integrate the evaluation data these institutions generate  into specific decision-making processes with a clear understanding how evaluation evidence can and should inform choices, and a strategy to ensure evaluation services provide necessary evidence. A network of institutions will ensure that the system overall is efficient and connected with national statistical services. Building people’s skills and knowledge receives a lot of attention, albeit with short-term measures. To close the demand gap for highly qualified evaluators, a long-term solution lies in investing in tertiary education that incorporates evaluation in faculties such as public administration, both for those who will become policymakers and policy implementers and need to understand evaluation evidence and its use in policy making and implementation, as well as graduate programs for evaluators to equip them with the necessary skills to deliver high quality evaluations. Working with a group of leading universities in partner and client countries to create a network will also help in developing comparable curricula, professional standards, and eventual professionalization of  this young profession.