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Report/Evaluation Type:Project Level Evaluations (PPARs)
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Senegal: A Decade of World Bank Support to Senegal’s Nutrition Program

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This report assesses the performance of three projects: (1) the Nutrition Enhancement Program, (2) the Nutrition Enhancement Project in Support of the Second Phase of the Nutrition Enhancement Program, and (3) the Rapid Response Child-Focused Social Cash Transfer and Nutrition Security Project. At the start of the new millennium, malnutrition in Senegal was of great concern. Malnutrition Show MoreThis report assesses the performance of three projects: (1) the Nutrition Enhancement Program, (2) the Nutrition Enhancement Project in Support of the Second Phase of the Nutrition Enhancement Program, and (3) the Rapid Response Child-Focused Social Cash Transfer and Nutrition Security Project. At the start of the new millennium, malnutrition in Senegal was of great concern. Malnutrition contributes to child and maternal mortality and morbidity, undermines children’s prospects of reaching their physical and intellectual potential, and undercuts income-earning potential for households and overall productivity and economic development. Its two principal causes are inadequate food intake and illness. Underlying factors are poverty; inadequate access to quality food; inadequate knowledge and behaviors favoring the health of mothers and children; and inadequate services, especially health, clean water, and sanitation. In 2001, the government of Senegal issued a new nutrition policy, supporting a 10-year goal to improve nutrition through a community-based, multisectoral approach. The policy was translated into the 10-year Nutrition Enhancement Program (NEP), financed by the government of Senegal, the World Bank, and eventually others. The government of Senegal also created the Cellule de Lutte contre la Malnutrition (Agency in Charge of the Fight against Malnutrition; CLM), attached to the prime minister’s office, responsible for policy oversight and evaluation.

eGhana Project (PPAR)

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This Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) reviews the World Bank’s eGhana Project, which was approved on August 1, 2006 at an original cost of XDR 26.90 million (US$40.0 million) from International Development Association (IDA) resources. The eGhana project responded to the Government’s request for support in implementing its agenda for Information and Communication Technology (ICT)-led Show MoreThis Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) reviews the World Bank’s eGhana Project, which was approved on August 1, 2006 at an original cost of XDR 26.90 million (US$40.0 million) from International Development Association (IDA) resources. The eGhana project responded to the Government’s request for support in implementing its agenda for Information and Communication Technology (ICT)-led growth. This project was based on sound analytical work and the Bank’s experience in Ghana and elsewhere (including the ICT development project in Sri Lanka). The project development objective was to assist the Government of Ghana to generate growth and employment by leveraging ICT and public-private partnerships to: i) develop the IT Enabled Services (ITES) industry, and ii) contribute to improved efficiency and transparency of selected government functions through e-government applications.

Colombia: Public and Private Paths to Sustainable Water Supply and Sanitation in Colombia (1999-2011) (Project Performance Assessment Report)

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Water supply and sanitation in Colombia have improved in recent decades. Between 1990 and 2010, access to improved sanitation increased from 67 percent to 82 percent, and access to improved water sources increased from 89 percent to 94 percent (WHO/UNICEF 2010), but coverage in rural areas still lags behind. The three projects covered by this assessment—the Cartagena Water Supply, Sewerage, Show MoreWater supply and sanitation in Colombia have improved in recent decades. Between 1990 and 2010, access to improved sanitation increased from 67 percent to 82 percent, and access to improved water sources increased from 89 percent to 94 percent (WHO/UNICEF 2010), but coverage in rural areas still lags behind. The three projects covered by this assessment—the Cartagena Water Supply, Sewerage, and Environmental Management Project (the Cartagena Project); the Water Sector Reform Assistance Project (WSRAP); and the Water and Sanitation Sector Support Project (WSSSP)—are among the second generation of water supply and sanitation (WSS) projects that benefited from the lessons learned in the 1990s from Bank-supported WSS projects in Colombia. The overall project outcome, based on relevance, efficacy, and efficiency, is rated satisfactory. Relevance of the objectives and design are both rated substantial. Achievement of two objectives was rated high, and one was rated substantial, since all objectives were achieved or surpassed. Efficiency is rated substantial, and risks to development outcome are rated negligible, since ACUACAR had proven to be an efficient and sustainable mixed-enterprise (public-private) model that survived numerous shifts in political administrations. Both Bank and borrower performances are rated satisfactory.

Solomon Islands: Rural Development Program (PPAR)

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The Solomon Islands Rural Development Program (Phase I) was the Bank’s first major intervention in Solomon Islands following the Tensions of 1998-2003. The project envisaged making the government more visible in rural areas of the archipelago and sought to re-energize commercial activity and opportunities for agricultural producers. The project’s objective was to take a community driven Show MoreThe Solomon Islands Rural Development Program (Phase I) was the Bank’s first major intervention in Solomon Islands following the Tensions of 1998-2003. The project envisaged making the government more visible in rural areas of the archipelago and sought to re-energize commercial activity and opportunities for agricultural producers. The project’s objective was to take a community driven development (CDD) approach to supporting rural infrastructure and to put in place the necessary structures for CDD to be a useful mechanism for future development.

Kenya: Development of the National Statistical System Project (PPAR)

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This project was initiated in September 2003 at the request of the government of Kenya. The government had prepared the Strategic Implementation Master Plan in data development to counteract a progressive decline of statistical institutions and capacity in the preceding two decades. At the time, a growing international consensus was emerging on the need for global action to promote better Show MoreThis project was initiated in September 2003 at the request of the government of Kenya. The government had prepared the Strategic Implementation Master Plan in data development to counteract a progressive decline of statistical institutions and capacity in the preceding two decades. At the time, a growing international consensus was emerging on the need for global action to promote better statistics among developing countries. The World Bank agreed to provide the support, but the support was delayed for several years due to external events. In March 2007, an International Development Association credit of US$20.5 million was approved for the Development of the National Statistics System Project (also known as the Statistical Capacity Building Program [STATCAP]). It closed in September 2012.

Zambia: Water Sector Performance Improvement Project

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This Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) assesses the development effectiveness of the Water Sector Performance Improvement Project (WSPIP) in Zambia. The project’s original objectives were: (i) the improvement of access to, and sustainability of, the water supply and sanitation services for consumers in Lusaka; and (ii) development of a comprehensive institutional structure Show MoreThis Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) assesses the development effectiveness of the Water Sector Performance Improvement Project (WSPIP) in Zambia. The project’s original objectives were: (i) the improvement of access to, and sustainability of, the water supply and sanitation services for consumers in Lusaka; and (ii) development of a comprehensive institutional structure supporting a coordinated approach to water supply and sanitation investments. In 2009, Additional Financing was approved, and the objectives were revised to (i) improve the technical efficiency and financial sustainability of Lusaka Water and Sanitation Company and improve access to water supply and sanitation services for urban consumers in Lusaka, Kafue, Chongwe, and Luangwa districts, and (ii) strengthen the effectiveness of national water supply and sanitation planning.

Africa Stockpiles Program (Project Performance Assessment Report)

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Ratings for the Africa Stockpiles Program were as follows: outcome was unsatisfactory, risk to development outcome was moderate, Bank performance was unsatisfactory, and Borrower performance was moderately satisfactory. Some of the key lessons learned from the project include lessons for environmental operations, project design and institutional capacity. Some of these lessons are: 1) investments Show MoreRatings for the Africa Stockpiles Program were as follows: outcome was unsatisfactory, risk to development outcome was moderate, Bank performance was unsatisfactory, and Borrower performance was moderately satisfactory. Some of the key lessons learned from the project include lessons for environmental operations, project design and institutional capacity. Some of these lessons are: 1) investments in highly technical environmental cleanup operations often face significant unknowns with respect to the nature and extent of the pollution problem and the available options for remedial actions; 2) a horizontal adaptable program loan may not add efficiencies in preparation or synergies in implementation if country circumstances are significantly different and if there is little opportunity for intercountry cooperation and coordination; 3) complex international partnership arrangements, such as those in the ASP-P1, can result in conflicts in defining roles and responsibilities, challenges in effective coordination, and confusion in project interventions.

Kingdom of Cambodia: Public Financial Management and Accountability Project (Project Performance Assessment Report)

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The World Bank extended support to Cambodia through the Public Financial Management and Accountability Project (PFMAP) during a time when 30 percent of the population lived below the poverty line, human development indicators were discouraging, and public services were largely inaccessible and lacked adequate quality. In this context, sound economic management and the effective and accountable Show MoreThe World Bank extended support to Cambodia through the Public Financial Management and Accountability Project (PFMAP) during a time when 30 percent of the population lived below the poverty line, human development indicators were discouraging, and public services were largely inaccessible and lacked adequate quality. In this context, sound economic management and the effective and accountable use of public resources were paramount in order to improve economic and social improvements. However, many important institutions of governance and public sector management, were destroyed by the ultra-radical Khmer Rouge regime, and only just started to be rebuilt. Public financial management was largely dysfunctional, posed significant fiduciary risks and oversight institutions were unfit to point out systemic problems and corruption. Further, resource mobilization was among the weakest in the region, undermining aggregate fiscal sustainability. The PFMAP aimed to address many of these ailments through strengthening the mobilization and utilization of public resources, bolstering accountability institutions, and developing the capacity of the civil service.

Senegal: Urban Mobility Improvement Project (Project Performance Assessment Report)

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This is the Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) by the Independent Evaluation Group of the World Bank Group on the Senegal Urban Mobility Improvement Project (IDA 33540, IDA 3354A). The project was the first of a two-phase Adaptable Program Loan, but the second Adaptable Program Loan did not proceed because the trigger conditions were not met. The International Development Association Show MoreThis is the Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) by the Independent Evaluation Group of the World Bank Group on the Senegal Urban Mobility Improvement Project (IDA 33540, IDA 3354A). The project was the first of a two-phase Adaptable Program Loan, but the second Adaptable Program Loan did not proceed because the trigger conditions were not met. The International Development Association financed US$75.71 million of the actual project cost of US$156.92 million— with a cost overrun of 152 percent compared with the originally appraised cost of US$103 million. The project was appraised on January 28, 2000; approved by the World Bank’s Board on May 25, 2000; declared effective with a one-year delay on May 14, 2001; and closed on September 30, 2008, after a delay of two years and nine months from the original closing date of December 31, 2005.

Ghana: Statistical Development Project (Project Performance Assessment Report)

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Following the declaration of the Marrakech Action Plan for Statistics in November 2004, and with a growing global consensus on the need to build and broaden the statistical capacity of developing countries, the Government of Ghana began a process of analytical reviews and needs assessments. Late in 2008, with the support of the World Bank, the United Kingdom’s Department for Show MoreFollowing the declaration of the Marrakech Action Plan for Statistics in November 2004, and with a growing global consensus on the need to build and broaden the statistical capacity of developing countries, the Government of Ghana began a process of analytical reviews and needs assessments. Late in 2008, with the support of the World Bank, the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DIFD), and other external partners, the Ghana Statistical Service (GSS) launched the Ghana Statistical Development Program (GSDP). It was an ambitious and far-reaching plan designed to align and dovetail the work program with the needs of the general public and the government, including the requirements for planning, policy making, and monitoring and evaluation. This Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) focuses on the results of the World Bank’s Ghana Statistical Development Project (P118585), which was approved in December 2010 and closed in June 2013. It was the first in a series of two World Bank operations dedicated to supporting the government’s broader initiative with the same title—Ghana Statistical Development Program. The objective of this operation was “to prepare GSS for institutional reform and to ensure timely and extensive analysis and dissemination of census data1.” For the second operation, the objective was “to strengthen the National Statistical System in the production and dissemination of timely and robust statistics relevant for evidence-based policy making and other uses.” This PPAR also discusses, but does not review, the second operation.