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Report/Evaluation Type:Country-Focused Evaluations
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Cluster Country Program Evaluation on Small States: Pacific Island Countries Program Evaluation (FY05–15 - Volume 2)

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This is the appendix to the evaluation that assesses the Bank Group’s relevance and effectiveness in the PICs as satisfactory. The World Bank made effective use of budgetary, IDA, and trust fund resources to support significant transformational changes in the region, and had a key role in persuading Australia and New Zealand to adopt temporary migration programs that yielded major benefits to Show MoreThis is the appendix to the evaluation that assesses the Bank Group’s relevance and effectiveness in the PICs as satisfactory. The World Bank made effective use of budgetary, IDA, and trust fund resources to support significant transformational changes in the region, and had a key role in persuading Australia and New Zealand to adopt temporary migration programs that yielded major benefits to participating countries. In addition, the World Bank persuaded a number of PICs governments to scale back their departments for infrastructure maintenance and to outsource this maintenance to the private sector. It also increased awareness of the need to build climate resilience into infrastructure design and enabled major improvements in communications through enhanced connectivity. Looking forward, the evaluation emphasizes collaboration between the World Bank and the International Finance Corporation to more effectively support private sector development; increasing the focus on education’s role in providing the skills needed for developing tourism, agriculture, and fisheries; and providing better preparation for temporary and permanent migrants.

Panama: Completion and Learning Review (CLR)

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This review examines the implementation of the FY11-14 Panama Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) and the CPS Progress Report and assesses the Completion and Learning Review. IEG rates the overall outcome of the CPS program as Moderately Satisfactory. IEG rates the World Bank Group performance as Fair, lower than the CLR rating of Good. IEG broadly concurs with the CLR lessons learned and Show MoreThis review examines the implementation of the FY11-14 Panama Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) and the CPS Progress Report and assesses the Completion and Learning Review. IEG rates the overall outcome of the CPS program as Moderately Satisfactory. IEG rates the World Bank Group performance as Fair, lower than the CLR rating of Good. IEG broadly concurs with the CLR lessons learned and highlights two additional points: (1) some CPS objectives were overly ambitious in light of the limited institutional capacity and time frame; (2) the dropped operations in the roads sector suggest that strategic selectivity would be enhanced through better coordination with development partners at the design stage.

Zambia, Country Program Evaluation FY04-13

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This country program evaluation (CPE) evaluates World Bank Group operations in Zambia from FY04 through FY13. The Bank Group covers IDA or the Bank, the International Finance Corporation, and the Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency. The period reviewed was covered by two completed country strategies, one for FY04-07 and the other for FY08-11, as well as part of the ongoing Country Show More This country program evaluation (CPE) evaluates World Bank Group operations in Zambia from FY04 through FY13. The Bank Group covers IDA or the Bank, the International Finance Corporation, and the Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency. The period reviewed was covered by two completed country strategies, one for FY04-07 and the other for FY08-11, as well as part of the ongoing Country Partnership Strategy FY13-16. This report is part of the cluster CPE for natural resource-rich developing countries that covers Bolivia, Kazakhstan, and Mongolia in addition to Zambia. The CPEs in this clustered report assess whether the Bank Group assistance supported relevant objectives; the extent to which these objectives were achieved effectively and efficiently; and the institutional development impact and sustainability of the Bank Group's interventions. It will also make recommendations for future Bank Group programs in the four countries reviewed based on lessons of past experience.

Kazakhstan, Country Program Evaluation FY04-13

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This Country Program Evaluation (CPE) evaluates World Bank Group (International Bank for Reconstruction and Development [IBRD], or the Bank, the International Finance Corporation [IFC], and Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency [MIGA]) programs in Kazakhstan from FY04 through FY14. The period reviewed was covered by two country strategies: the 2004 Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) and the Show More This Country Program Evaluation (CPE) evaluates World Bank Group (International Bank for Reconstruction and Development [IBRD], or the Bank, the International Finance Corporation [IFC], and Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency [MIGA]) programs in Kazakhstan from FY04 through FY14. The period reviewed was covered by two country strategies: the 2004 Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) and the ongoing CPS for FY12-17.   This report is part of the clustered CPE for natural resource-rich developing countries that covers four countries: Bolivia, Mongolia, and Zambia, in addition to Kazakhstan. The clustered CPE exploits the learning potential of looking across countries and regions. In addition to each country CPE, the clustered CPE also includes an overarching report that summarizes the experiences and draws broader conclusions and lessons across countries.

Mozambique CLR Review FY12-15

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Mozambique is a low income country with a GNI per capita of $1,120 in 2014. The country experienced rapid growth over the last 25 years, but high poverty rates persist, particularly in the rural areas. Data from the National Statistics Institute show that the poverty headcount ratio fell from 70 to 46 percent between 1996 and 2014. The country’s reliance on capital intensive investments led to Show MoreMozambique is a low income country with a GNI per capita of $1,120 in 2014. The country experienced rapid growth over the last 25 years, but high poverty rates persist, particularly in the rural areas. Data from the National Statistics Institute show that the poverty headcount ratio fell from 70 to 46 percent between 1996 and 2014. The country’s reliance on capital intensive investments led to rapid economic growth but generated relatively few jobs and their ties to the rest of the economy are limited. Unemployment rate remained at 22.6 percent in 2012-2014. The country ranks low in Human Development Index: 180 out of 188 countries. Natural hazards hit the country frequently and hard, and are likely to worsen with climate change. The government’s Action Plan to Reduce Poverty for 2011-2014 (Plano de Acção de Redução de Pobreza -PARP) sought to confront these problems and the WBG’s Country partnership Strategy (CPS) addressed some of these challenges under the pillars of competitiveness and employment (Focus Area I), vulnerability and resilience (Focus Area II), and a foundation pillar, governance and public sector capacity (Focus Area III). In April 2016, the government acknowledged to the IMF that it had borrowed an amount in excess of $1 billion in commercial terms during 2012-2015. The disclosure weakened investors’ confidence in the country’s macroeconomic stability, and contributed to further depreciating the metical. These two factors combined raised the country’s debt to GDP ratio from 60 percent in 2014 to 120 percent in 2016.

Cluster Country Program Evaluation on Small States: Pacific Island Countries Program Evaluation (FY05–15 - Volume 1)

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This evaluation assesses the Bank Group’s relevance and effectiveness in the PICs as satisfactory. The World Bank made effective use of budgetary, IDA, and trust fund resources to support significant transformational changes in the region, and had a key role in persuading Australia and New Zealand to adopt temporary migration programs that yielded major benefits to participating countries. In Show MoreThis evaluation assesses the Bank Group’s relevance and effectiveness in the PICs as satisfactory. The World Bank made effective use of budgetary, IDA, and trust fund resources to support significant transformational changes in the region, and had a key role in persuading Australia and New Zealand to adopt temporary migration programs that yielded major benefits to participating countries. In addition, the World Bank persuaded a number of PICs governments to scale back their departments for infrastructure maintenance and to outsource this maintenance to the private sector. It also increased awareness of the need to build climate resilience into infrastructure design and enabled major improvements in communications through enhanced connectivity. Looking forward, the evaluation emphasizes collaboration between the World Bank and the International Finance Corporation to more effectively support private sector development; increasing the focus on education’s role in providing the skills needed for developing tourism, agriculture, and fisheries; and providing better preparation for temporary and permanent migrants.

Mongolia, Country Program Evaluation FY05-13

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This country program evaluation (CPE) evaluates the World Bank Group's operations in Mongolia from FY05-13, as part of a cluster of country evaluations of resource-rich developing countries, also including Bolivia, Kazakhstan, and Zambia. This country program evaluation (CPE) evaluates the World Bank Group's operations in Mongolia from FY05-13, as part of a cluster of country evaluations of resource-rich developing countries, also including Bolivia, Kazakhstan, and Zambia.

The Plurinational State of Bolivia, Country Program Evaluation FY05-13

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This Country Program Evaluation (CPE) assesses the outcomes of the World Bank Group's operations in Bolivia during the period from FY05 to FY13. It is part of the Clustered CPE for Resource Rich Developing Countries, which includes four standalone CPEs for Bolivia, Kazakhstan, Mongolia, and Zambia and draws lessons across countries in an over-arching report. The Bolivia CPE examines the Show More This Country Program Evaluation (CPE) assesses the outcomes of the World Bank Group's operations in Bolivia during the period from FY05 to FY13. It is part of the Clustered CPE for Resource Rich Developing Countries, which includes four standalone CPEs for Bolivia, Kazakhstan, Mongolia, and Zambia and draws lessons across countries in an over-arching report. The Bolivia CPE examines the relevance and realism of Bank Group objectives in the context of the development constraints facing the country, the extent to which these objectives were achieved effectively and efficiently, and the institutional development impact and ustainability of the Bank Group's interventions.

Brazil Country Program Evaluation, FY04-11

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During the first decade of the 2000s, Brazil made important achievements in shared prosperity: it achieved fiscal sustainability and economic growth while at the same time reducing poverty and income inequality. Brazil also substantially reduced the rate of deforestation in the Amazon. During the first decade of the 2000s, Brazil made important achievements in shared prosperity: it achieved fiscal sustainability and economic growth while at the same time reducing poverty and income inequality. Brazil also substantially reduced the rate of deforestation in the Amazon.

Belize CLR Review FY12-15

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Belize is a small and open, upper middle income country that is highly exposed to natural disasters and terms of trade shocks. The country had a population of 359,287 in 2015 with a GNI per capita of US$4,490. The country experienced a decline in its GDP growth from 3.7 percent in 2012 to 1.0 percent in 2015, but the average growth during the review period was 2.5 percent,higher than the LAC Show MoreBelize is a small and open, upper middle income country that is highly exposed to natural disasters and terms of trade shocks. The country had a population of 359,287 in 2015 with a GNI per capita of US$4,490. The country experienced a decline in its GDP growth from 3.7 percent in 2012 to 1.0 percent in 2015, but the average growth during the review period was 2.5 percent,higher than the LAC average of 1.5 percent and at par with the rest of the world. Poverty is a rural phenomenon in Belize, reaching 55 percent compared to 28 percent in urban areas in 2009.Overall, the latest poverty estimates indicate that 42 percent of the population lived in poverty in 2009. Income inequality, as measured by the Gini coefficient increased from 0.42 in 2009 to 0.53 in 2013. In 2015, Belize ranked 103 (of 188 countries) on its Human Development Index compared to its rank of 96 (of 187 countries) in 2012. The government’s medium and long-term development strategies as reflected in the NationalPoverty Eradication Strategy and Action Plan, 2009-2013 (NPESAP), the Medium-Term Development Strategy (MTDS, 2010-2013) and Horizon 2030 articulated the priority areas ofgovernment to include sustainable environment and natural resource management, environment and disaster risk management, macroeconomic and fiscal management, government transparency and accountability, growth and sustainability, and human development. The major challenges the country faced during the CPS period include natural disasters, terms of trade shocks, rising fiscal deficits and debt accumulation. This is the first Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) for Belize following the Bank’s re-engagement in 2009 through an Interim Strategy Note (ISN-FY 09-11), after a long hiatus (2001-2009). The Bank suspended its program in the country in 2001 due to fiscal and governance concerns. The CPS had three focus areas (i) policies and strategies for mainstreaming of natural resources and climate resilience; (ii) institutional capacity strengthening for natural resource management and climate change; and (iii) investments to strengthen climate resilience. The Bank concentrated on achieving sustainable natural resource-based growth and enhanced climate resilience, leveraged its limited IBRD envelope through trust fund resources and collaboration with other development partners.