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Bosnia and Herzegovina - BiH DPL

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Belize CLR Review FY12-15

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Belize is a small and open, upper middle income country that is highly exposed to natural disasters and terms of trade shocks. The country had a population of 359,287 in 2015 with a GNI per capita of US$4,490. The country experienced a decline in its GDP growth from 3.7 percent in 2012 to 1.0 percent in 2015, but the average growth during the review period was 2.5 percent,higher than the LAC Show MoreBelize is a small and open, upper middle income country that is highly exposed to natural disasters and terms of trade shocks. The country had a population of 359,287 in 2015 with a GNI per capita of US$4,490. The country experienced a decline in its GDP growth from 3.7 percent in 2012 to 1.0 percent in 2015, but the average growth during the review period was 2.5 percent,higher than the LAC average of 1.5 percent and at par with the rest of the world. Poverty is a rural phenomenon in Belize, reaching 55 percent compared to 28 percent in urban areas in 2009.Overall, the latest poverty estimates indicate that 42 percent of the population lived in poverty in 2009. Income inequality, as measured by the Gini coefficient increased from 0.42 in 2009 to 0.53 in 2013. In 2015, Belize ranked 103 (of 188 countries) on its Human Development Index compared to its rank of 96 (of 187 countries) in 2012. The government’s medium and long-term development strategies as reflected in the NationalPoverty Eradication Strategy and Action Plan, 2009-2013 (NPESAP), the Medium-Term Development Strategy (MTDS, 2010-2013) and Horizon 2030 articulated the priority areas ofgovernment to include sustainable environment and natural resource management, environment and disaster risk management, macroeconomic and fiscal management, government transparency and accountability, growth and sustainability, and human development. The major challenges the country faced during the CPS period include natural disasters, terms of trade shocks, rising fiscal deficits and debt accumulation. This is the first Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) for Belize following the Bank’s re-engagement in 2009 through an Interim Strategy Note (ISN-FY 09-11), after a long hiatus (2001-2009). The Bank suspended its program in the country in 2001 due to fiscal and governance concerns. The CPS had three focus areas (i) policies and strategies for mainstreaming of natural resources and climate resilience; (ii) institutional capacity strengthening for natural resource management and climate change; and (iii) investments to strengthen climate resilience. The Bank concentrated on achieving sustainable natural resource-based growth and enhanced climate resilience, leveraged its limited IBRD envelope through trust fund resources and collaboration with other development partners.

Mexico - MX Efficiency Improvement Program

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Macedonia, former Yugoslav Republic of - REGIONAL AND LOCAL RDS PROG SUPPORT PROJ

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Vietnam CLR Review FY12-16

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Vietnam is a lower middle income country with a GNI per capita income of $ 1,990 in 2015. During the review period, the country continued to experience rapid GDP growth averaging 5.8 percent, compared to 4.3 percent for the East Asia and Pacific region as a whole. The poverty headcount ratio at national poverty lines (which had been 58 percent in 1993) dropped from 17.2 percent in 2012 to 13. Show MoreVietnam is a lower middle income country with a GNI per capita income of $ 1,990 in 2015. During the review period, the country continued to experience rapid GDP growth averaging 5.8 percent, compared to 4.3 percent for the East Asia and Pacific region as a whole. The poverty headcount ratio at national poverty lines (which had been 58 percent in 1993) dropped from 17.2 percent in 2012 to 13.5 percent in 2014, with the remaining poverty being largely a rural issue (18.6 percent in 2014 versus 3.8 percent in urban areas), and mostly among ethnic minorities. Vietnam’s ranking on the UNDP Human Development Index also continued to improve – from 128th in 2011 to 115th in 2015 – compared to neighboring Lao PDR and Cambodia which are currently ranked around 140th place. However, economic inequality as measured by the GINI index is improving quite slowly – from 38.7 in 2012 to 37.6 in 2014. This is the first WBG Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) for Vietnam after it had become a lower middle-income country in 2009. The CPS was well aligned with the government’s objectives and stated development goals. It supported the implementation of the government’s Socio- Economic Development Strategy (SEDS, 2011-20) as this was operationalized in the Socio- Economic Development Plan (2011-15). The SEDS focused on structural reform, environmental sustainability, and the then emerging issues of macro-economic stability, with three core areas: promoting human resources and skills development, improving market institutions, and infrastructure development. At the time of the CPS, Vietnam had undergone a systemic transformation towards a more market oriented economy and with high economic growth and significant poverty reduction. Vietnam had, however, begun to find it more difficult to maintain high growth levels together with macroeconomic stability, and poverty was increasingly being concentrated in ethnic minority communities. The country’s aspirations to avoid the middle income trap and become a successful middle income country would require strengthening of the economy’s competitiveness, and environmental impacts of development needed to be better managed. In line with these concerns, the WBG through the CPS and the Progress Learning Review (PLR) focused on partnering with Vietnam to help the country achieve success as a middle income country with three focus areas: Competitiveness, Sustainability, and Opportunity. These important aspects - addressed in the CPS program - continue to be relevant, as shown in the 2016 Systematic Country Diagnostic (SCD).

Senegal: Une décennie de soutien de la Banque mondiale au programme de nutrition du Sénégal (PPAR)

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Ce rapport évalue la performance de trois projets : (1) le Programme de Renforcement de la nutrition, (2) le Projet de Renforcement de la nutrition à l’appui de la Deuxième phase du Programme de Renforcement de la nutrition, et (3) le Projet d’Intervention rapide pour la Sécurité nutritionnelle et les Transferts en espèces axés sur les Enfants. Au début du nouveau millénaire, le Sénégal fait Show MoreCe rapport évalue la performance de trois projets : (1) le Programme de Renforcement de la nutrition, (2) le Projet de Renforcement de la nutrition à l’appui de la Deuxième phase du Programme de Renforcement de la nutrition, et (3) le Projet d’Intervention rapide pour la Sécurité nutritionnelle et les Transferts en espèces axés sur les Enfants. Au début du nouveau millénaire, le Sénégal fait face à un problème préoccupant de malnutrition. Parmi les enfants âgés de moins de cinq ans près d'un tiers (30 %) souffrait d’une malnutrition chronique (taille petite pour l'âge), 10 % de malnutrition aiguë (poids faible pour la taille), et 20 % d’une insuffisance pondérale (poids pour l'âge) ; chacun de ces niveaux étant classé très sévère par l'Organisation mondiale de la Santé (OMS). Les taux varient considérablement, les pauvres et les populations rurales, celles des zones du nord, du sud et du centre touchées de façon disproportionnée. La malnutrition contribue à la mortalité et à la morbidité des mères et des enfants, sape les chances d'accès des enfants à leur potentiel physique et intellectuel et réduit les opportunités de revenus pour les ménages, ainsi que la productivité globale et le développement économique. La maladie et une disponibilité alimentaire insuffisante sont les deux causes principales de cette malnutrition. Les facteurs sous-jacents sont la pauvreté, un accès insuffisant à une alimentation de qualité, des connaissances et comportements inadéquats pour promouvoir la santé des mères et des enfants et des services, en particulier de santé, d’approvisionnement en eau propre et d'assainissement, qui font défaut. En 2001, le Gouvernement du Sénégal a élaboré une nouvelle politique nationale de nutrition, apportant son soutien à un objectif sur dix ans, visant à améliorer la nutrition par l’adoption d’une approche multisectorielle communautaire. La politique s’est traduite par la mise en place du Programme de Renforcement de la nutrition de 10 ans (PRN), financé par l’État, la Banque mondiale, et, plus tard, d’autres partenaires techniques et financiers (PTF). L’État a également créé la Cellule de Lutte contre la malnutrition (CLM—une agence chargée de lutter contre la malnutrition), rattachée au cabinet du Premier ministre, responsable de la coordination de la mise en oeuvre de la politique, ainsi que de son évaluation.

Brazil - BR GEF Sustainable Cerrado Initiative

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India - IN: Andhra Pradesh and Telangana State C

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China - CN-Wenchuan Earthquake Recovery Project

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Kosovo CLR Review FY12-16

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Kosovo is a lower middle income country with GNI per capita of $3,702 in 2016. Due to its recent turbulent past, Kosovo is considered a fragile and conflict affected country. About 30 percent of the population lived in poverty and about 10 percent lived in extreme poverty in 2011. Inequality remains high, but has been declining: the Gini coefficient has changed from 31.8 in 2009 to 26.7 in Show MoreKosovo is a lower middle income country with GNI per capita of $3,702 in 2016. Due to its recent turbulent past, Kosovo is considered a fragile and conflict affected country. About 30 percent of the population lived in poverty and about 10 percent lived in extreme poverty in 2011. Inequality remains high, but has been declining: the Gini coefficient has changed from 31.8 in 2009 to 26.7 in 2013. Employment rates are the lowest in Europe: 29.7 percent in 2012 and 28.0 in 2016. The country’s human development index (HDI), at 0.741 in 2015, is one of the lowest in the Balkan region, next to Albania and Bosnia and Herzegovina, both ranked 85th among 188 countries. At the time of the CPS preparation, Kosovo’s key development challenges were to create employment of good quality and mitigate accumulated environmental damage. After the armed conflict ended in 1999, the economy grew at about 6 percent per year until 2009, but growth slowed down to 3.5 percent during 2009-2011 and to 3.2 percent during 2012-2016. An inadequate and inconsistent supply of energy remains the key bottleneck to development. Environmental issues have become more prominent as the mitigation cost rises and the country seeks to meet EU’s environmental standards.