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Report/Evaluation Type:Project Level Evaluations (PPARs)
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Vietnam: Water Resources Assistance Project (PPAR)

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When the Vietnam Water Resources Assistance Project (VWRAP) was designed, Vietnam was the world’s second largest rice exporter, but land and labor productivity was relatively low in comparison with neighboring countries. About half of cultivated land was irrigated. Ninety-six percent of the nation’s 7,600 dams were used for irrigation, but the hydraulic infrastructure was deteriorating, and dam Show MoreWhen the Vietnam Water Resources Assistance Project (VWRAP) was designed, Vietnam was the world’s second largest rice exporter, but land and labor productivity was relatively low in comparison with neighboring countries. About half of cultivated land was irrigated. Ninety-six percent of the nation’s 7,600 dams were used for irrigation, but the hydraulic infrastructure was deteriorating, and dam safety monitoring was considered inadequate. A major constraint to improving agricultural productivity was underperformance of the large rice-based flood irrigation systems, because of their outdated infrastructure and institutional design. The government of Vietnam had initiated a broad-based program to modernize agriculture and requested World Bank assistance to finance a project that would introduce innovative approaches to irrigation modernization and address dam safety issues. The project development objectives were to modernize and increase the productivity of Vietnamese agriculture, improve the management of water resources, and reduce dam safety risks.  Ratings for this project are as follows: Outcome was moderately satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was moderate, Bank performance was moderately satisfactory, and Borrower performance was moderately satisfactory. Lessons from the project include: (i) The Project’s close alignment with the government of Socialist Republic of Vietnam’s agriculture reform programs allowed it to pilot innovations that have had enduring policy impacts. (ii) Irrigation modernization is a complex learning process that requires time and a phased approach. (iii) Key results indicators and monitoring and evaluation (M&E) frameworks should be linked to development objectives and a clearly stated theory of change. (iv) For affordability reasons, water user fees may be insufficient to ensure the financial viability of water user groups; in that case, additional sources of funds including subsidies may need to be considered.

Jamaica Economic Stabilization and Foundations for Growth Development Policy Loan (DPL) (PPAR)

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This Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) reviews the Economic Stabilization and Foundations for Growth Development Policy Loan (DPL), approved on December 12, 2013. The objectives of the operation were to improve (i) the investment climate and competitiveness, and (ii) public financial management for sustainable fiscal consolidation. Objectives were highly relevant to country Show MoreThis Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) reviews the Economic Stabilization and Foundations for Growth Development Policy Loan (DPL), approved on December 12, 2013. The objectives of the operation were to improve (i) the investment climate and competitiveness, and (ii) public financial management for sustainable fiscal consolidation. Objectives were highly relevant to country conditions and the need to avoid fiscal insolvency and begin implementing a comprehensive program of stabilization and reform. They were closely aligned with the World Bank’s strategy and government priorities. The design of the operation was substantially relevant to challenges, with policy priorities identified based on significant analytical work and nonlending technical assistance. The theory of change was convincing, with clear links among inputs, outputs, and expected results, although some indicators could have been more outcome oriented and clearer in their relation to objectives. One shortcoming of the design was the ambitious time frame for the implementation of some of the reforms related to investment climate and pensions, given the limited institutional capacity and a realistic assessment of the time needed for major legal reforms. Achievement of both objectives is rated substantial. Under the investment climate objective, reforms targeted improvements in contract enforcement, approval of building permits, and registration of micro, small, and medium enterprises to encourage their participation in the formal sector. Under the public financial management and fiscal consolidation objective, the program targeted progress on pension reform, tax reform, civil service reform, cash management, and public investment management. The impact of all reform actions was measured relative to specific indicator targets, which were substantially achieved or exceeded. These achievements were confirmed by additional quantitative indicators, qualitative gauges, and international benchmarking data. Some reforms, such as those in investment climate and pension reform, took longer than originally envisioned, but they proceeded and deepened over time. Cumulative evidence suggests that the reforms supported by the operation have been sustained and, in several areas, deepened during the past six years. This is reflected in the new development policy financing series supported by the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund Stand-By Arrangement that followed the successful conclusion of the three-year arrangement under the International Monetary Fund’s Extended Funding Facility.

India: Tamil Nadu Irrigated Agriculture Modernization and Water-Bodies Restoration and Management Project (PPAR)

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This Project Performance Assessment Report assesses the development effectiveness of India’s Tamil Nadu Irrigated Agriculture Modernization and Water-Bodies Restoration and Management (TN-IAMWARM) project, which was approved in 2007 and closed in 2015. The development objective of the project was to assist selected subbasin stakeholders in increasing the productivity of irrigated agriculture in Show MoreThis Project Performance Assessment Report assesses the development effectiveness of India’s Tamil Nadu Irrigated Agriculture Modernization and Water-Bodies Restoration and Management (TN-IAMWARM) project, which was approved in 2007 and closed in 2015. The development objective of the project was to assist selected subbasin stakeholders in increasing the productivity of irrigated agriculture in the state of Tamil Nadu within an integrated water resources management framework. Ratings for this project are as follows: Outcomes was satisfactory, Risk to development was substantial, Bank performance was satisfactory, and Borrower performance was satisfactory. Lessons from the project include: (i) Irrigation project design that combines improvements in infrastructure with activities for improving agricultural and water use practices, agricultural inputs, and marketing support and linkages, can be a viable and effective approach for improving agricultural productivity and rural livelihoods. (ii) For the several line departments that are necessarily involved in multi-dimensional irrigation projects, the provision of appropriate training can play a pivotal role in fostering collaborative behavior among the departments, and to orient them towards the farmer beneficiary as the focal point of their services. (iii) The tone set by the project leadership is crucial for fostering and sustaining collaborative behavior across diverse implementing agencies. (iv) Including a water resource management component in an irrigation project can be a strategically important decision with long-term payoffs but may have to be supplemented by other projects to realize the potential for wider water management and climate smart agricultural policies. (v) Introduction of water budgeting concepts at the village or sub-basin level is a crucial first step to build on by gradually promoting the measurement of water use and agricultural water productivity.

Philippines: Social Welfare and Development Reform Project (PPAR)

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This is the Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) by the Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) of the World Bank Group on the Social Welfare and Development Reform Project (including additional financing) in the Philippines. The project had two objectives: (i) strengthen the effectiveness of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) to efficiently implement the Pantawid Show MoreThis is the Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) by the Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) of the World Bank Group on the Social Welfare and Development Reform Project (including additional financing) in the Philippines. The project had two objectives: (i) strengthen the effectiveness of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) to efficiently implement the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program (the CCT program, known as Pantawid); and (ii) strengthen the effectiveness of the DSWD to expand an efficient and functional National Household Targeting System of social protection programs. Results for this Social Welfare and Development Reform Project are as follows: Outcome was highly satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was substantial, Bank performance was satisfactory, and Borrower performance was satisfactory. Lessons from the project include: (i) The success of a large, nationwide social protection program like Pantawid lies in creating and strengthening the operational and institutional systems needed to support it. (ii) Strong government ownership is critical to establishing and sustaining ambitious programs like Pantawid. (iii) The World Bank’s ability to bring global knowledge to bear and skillfully deploy a full technical engagement was key to success. (iv) Continuous monitoring and evaluation are essential to maintaining CCT programs like Pantawid and ensuring their constant evolution. (v) The quality of education and health, not just service utilization, is critical to achieve the expected gains in human capital. (vi) As for all CCTs, a graduation strategy is essential to ensure that the program delivers on longer-term benefits and acts as a stepping stone into more stable livelihoods.

Ethiopia: Nutrition Project (PPAR)

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Although Ethiopia has achieved substantial progress in economic, social, and human development over the past decade, the ranking of its Human Development Index remains low. Malnutrition is widespread, and it lowers resistance to infections and affects the intellectual development of children and productivity among adults. The project development objectives were “to improve child and maternal care Show MoreAlthough Ethiopia has achieved substantial progress in economic, social, and human development over the past decade, the ranking of its Human Development Index remains low. Malnutrition is widespread, and it lowers resistance to infections and affects the intellectual development of children and productivity among adults. The project development objectives were “to improve child and maternal care behavior, and increase utilization of key micronutrients, in order to contribute to improving the nutritional status of vulnerable groups.” Direct beneficiaries consisted of pregnant and lactating women, and under-five children in food insecure regions with high malnutrition rates. Ratings for the Nutrition Project are as follows: Outcome was satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was moderate, M&E Quality was substantial, Bank performance was moderately satisfactory, and Borrower performance was moderately satisfactory. Lessons from the project include: (i) The use of interactive approaches at the community level can facilitate behavior change. (ii) In very poor communities, CBN needs to complement behavior change interventions with income support to achieve the desired goals fully because behavior change also depends on the means to keep or to buy healthful and nutritionally rich food. (iii) Favorable institutional conditions, programmatic arrangements, and incentives facilitate the unfolding of multisectoral engagement. (iv) Integration of nutrition operations with an existing and institutionalized service delivery mechanism at the community level facilitates CBN implementation. (v) External collaboration with development partners, under government leadership, catalyzes international expertise and good practices that benefit and reinforce government policy and its nutrition agenda.

Peru: Juntos Results for Nutrition Project (PPAR)

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This is the Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) for the Juntos Results for Nutrition Project in Peru. The project objectives were to (i) increase demand for nutrition services by strengthening the operational effectiveness of Juntos and (ii) improve coverage and quality of the supply of basic preventive health and nutrition services in the communities covered under the program, including Show MoreThis is the Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) for the Juntos Results for Nutrition Project in Peru. The project objectives were to (i) increase demand for nutrition services by strengthening the operational effectiveness of Juntos and (ii) improve coverage and quality of the supply of basic preventive health and nutrition services in the communities covered under the program, including Juntos. The project targeted 3 of the 14 poorest regions of Peru: Amazonas, Cajamarca, and Huánuco. Ratings for the Juntos Results for Nutrition Project are as follows: Outcome was satisfactory, Bank performance was moderately satisfactory, and M&E quality was substantial. Lessons from the project include: (i) Long-term engagement is critical to a deep understanding of complex malnutrition challenges. (ii) Attitudes toward nutrition need to change at all levels to make a difference. (iii) It is important to address both the supply and demand for health and nutrition services. (iv) Understanding the causes, consequences, and corrective actions required to reduce malnutrition can lead to changes in behaviors. (v) Changes in beneficiaries’ behaviors cannot be assumed; they must be monitored.

Vietnam: Education Projects - School Readiness and Escuela Nueva

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The government and people of Vietnam place a high value on education. The government’s Socio-Economic Development Strategy 2010–20 and the Socio-Economic Development Plan 2016–20 emphasize the importance of investment in human capital to develop people’s skills in support of a knowledge-based economy. This assessment covers two projects: Vietnam School Readiness and Promotion Project, and the Show MoreThe government and people of Vietnam place a high value on education. The government’s Socio-Economic Development Strategy 2010–20 and the Socio-Economic Development Plan 2016–20 emphasize the importance of investment in human capital to develop people’s skills in support of a knowledge-based economy. This assessment covers two projects: Vietnam School Readiness and Promotion Project, and the Global Partnership for Education-Vietnam Escuela Nueva Project. Objectives for these projects are: (i) to raise school readiness for five-year old children, in particular for those most vulnerable to not succeeding in a school environment, through supporting selected elements of Vietnam’s Early Childhood Education (ECE) program, and (ii) to introduce and use new teaching and learning practices in the classroom targeting the most disadvantaged groups of primary students. Ratings for the Vietnam School Readiness and Promotion Project are as follows: Outcome was satisfactory, Bank performance was satisfactory, Quality of M&E was substantial, and Risk to development outcome was low. Ratings for the Global Partnership for Education – Vietnam Escuela Nueva Project are as follows: Outcome was satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was modest, Bank performance was satisfactory, and Borrower performance was satisfactory. IEG identified the following lessons from its evaluation of the two operations: (i) In addition to lending, the World Bank can add value through the transmission of knowledge from experiences and lessons that help shape reforms. (ii) When significant pedagogical changes are required of teachers, incentives, support, and long-term commitment are needed (probably more than education systems realize). (iii) When scaling up or adopting a systemwide approach, it is important to understand and design this approach in accordance with the decentralized context and challenges faced at the various levels of administration. (iv) Targeting disadvantaged areas does not translate into targeted efforts for specific vulnerable groups. (v) When scaling up, the importance of consultation and communication cannot be underestimated.

Poland: Public Finance, Resilience and Growth Development Policy Loans (PPAR)

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This Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) evaluates four lending operations implemented in Poland from 2012 to 2016. The development objectives of the first series were to support Poland’s fiscal consolidation agenda while strengthening fiscal institutions and improving the efficiency and sustainability of social spending. The objectives of the second series were to enhance macroeconomic Show MoreThis Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) evaluates four lending operations implemented in Poland from 2012 to 2016. The development objectives of the first series were to support Poland’s fiscal consolidation agenda while strengthening fiscal institutions and improving the efficiency and sustainability of social spending. The objectives of the second series were to enhance macroeconomic resilience, strengthen labor market flexibility and employment promotion, and improve private sector competitiveness and innovation. Ratings for the First and Second Public Finance Development Policy Loans are as follows: Outcome is satisfactory, Risk to development outcome is low, Bank performance is satisfactory, Borrower performance is moderately satisfactory. Ratings for the First and Second Resilience and Growth Development Policy Loans are as follows: Outcome is moderately satisfactory, Risk to development outcome is moderate, Bank performance is satisfactory, and Borrower performance is satisfactory. Lessons include: (i) Development policy lending can help mitigate global economic and financial shocks and protect vulnerable groups in high-income countries when accompanied with timely, high-quality, and responsive technical assistance that supports the reforms. (ii) Where a high-income country is required to implement constitutional provisions or agreed reforms with a regional body, providing support for the implementation of such reforms is likely to enhance the likelihood of success. (iii) RAS are a promising tool for engaging governments in high-income countries when Bank Group staff demonstrate the capacity to produce timely and high-quality analytical products in response to government requests. (iv) Coordinating with other partners in situations where the World Bank is not the largest stakeholder is important for successful implementation of reforms. (v) Analyzing the political cost of implementing proposed reform measures is an important part of policy lending.

El Salvador: Income Support and Employability Project (PPAR)

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This is a Project Performance Assessment Report of the Income Support and Employability Project (P117440) in El Salvador. The project development objective was to (i) provide temporary income support to the urban vulnerable poor, (ii) improve the coverage of labor intermediation and training services to the urban vulnerable poor, and (iii) improve the institutional capacity of the borrower to Show MoreThis is a Project Performance Assessment Report of the Income Support and Employability Project (P117440) in El Salvador. The project development objective was to (i) provide temporary income support to the urban vulnerable poor, (ii) improve the coverage of labor intermediation and training services to the urban vulnerable poor, and (iii) improve the institutional capacity of the borrower to develop an integrated social protection system. The project was approved in November 2009 (fiscal year [FY]10) with an original closing date envisioned for December 2014 (FY15). The project underwent five restructurings throughout implementation. The final closing date was August 2016 (FY17). At appraisal, project cost was estimated at $50 million and government counterpart funding was $4 million. By project closing, $49.3 million of the loan proceeds were disbursed. Ratings for the Income Support and Employability Project are as follows: Outcome was satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was substantial, Bank performance was satisfactory, and Borrower performance was moderately satisfactory. Lessons from this project include: (i) A crisis period can create opportunities for broader reform of an existing social protection system through projects that adequately balance short and long-term objectives. (ii) Ensuring high participation and higher incomes for vulnerable groups requires interventions that are specifically tailored to address the needs of these groups. (iii) In an emergency context, a project can be implemented rapidly and effectively by using the country’s existing capacity when the project relies on an implementing agency with a proven track record and is accompanied by close World Bank supervision. (iv) The support of knowledgeable local actors is critical for the successful implementation of an intervention in areas affected by high levels of crime and violence.

Jamaica: Inner City Basic Services for the Poor Project (PPAR)

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This is a Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) prepared by the Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) of the World Bank Group on the Inner City Basic Services for the Poor Project in Jamaica. This project was selected for a PPAR to provide insights into promoting urban resilience with a focus on informal settlements. The project represents an innovative experience for Jamaica in combining Show MoreThis is a Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) prepared by the Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) of the World Bank Group on the Inner City Basic Services for the Poor Project in Jamaica. This project was selected for a PPAR to provide insights into promoting urban resilience with a focus on informal settlements. The project represents an innovative experience for Jamaica in combining efforts to improve public safety and community capacity while upgrading urban infrastructure. The PPAR findings provide input to a major IEG evaluation on “Building Urban Resilience” (forthcoming, 2019). Ratings for the Inner City Basic Services for the Poor Project are as follows: Outcome was moderately satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was substantial, World Bank performance was moderately satisfactory, and Borrower performance was moderately unsatisfactory. Lessons from the project include: (i) Addressing urban crime and violence through a two-pronged approach of improving basic infrastructure and promoting social inclusion can benefit from the combination of those individual activities that are most effective. (ii) The sharp disconnect between a centralized and well-resourced agency executing infrastructure investments in a decentralized urban situation; and a multiplicity of under-resourced service agencies and local governments in charge of infrastructure maintenance can undermine long-term development outcomes. (iii) In project design, the decision to add activities that are institutionally complex and require focused expertise requires careful consideration to avoid straining resources and effort during project implementation. (iv) To sustain the benefits from community-based and social services for children and youth, long-term engagement is crucial: institutional ownership should be specified, and resources for those activities must be anticipated and secured by the time project support is discontinued.