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Report/Evaluation Type:Approach Papers
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An Evaluation of World Bank Group Support in Conflict Induced Situations of Forced Displacement (Approach Paper)

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This proposed evaluation aims to inform the World Bank Group’s scaling up of support to situations of forced displacement. It will focus on the World Bank Group’s emerging goals and catalytic role in countries and subregions hosting large forcibly displaced populations and providing lessons from past support to inform the World Bank Group’s position going forward. The evaluation pursues IEG’s Show MoreThis proposed evaluation aims to inform the World Bank Group’s scaling up of support to situations of forced displacement. It will focus on the World Bank Group’s emerging goals and catalytic role in countries and subregions hosting large forcibly displaced populations and providing lessons from past support to inform the World Bank Group’s position going forward. The evaluation pursues IEG’s strategic priority of providing evidence on what works and why, and it supports two of the strategic engagement areas in which IEG seeks to advance evaluative evidence: investing in people, and inclusive and sustainable economic growth. The evaluation effort is timed to be an input for the IDA18 mid-term review and IDA19 discussions.

The Power to Renew: Evaluation of the World Bank Group’s Support to Electricity Supply from Renewable Energy Resources

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This report evaluates how effectively the World Bank Group (WBG) has supported clients navigate an evolving market for renewable energy (RE) for supplying electricity to meet energy and environmental needs. It covers a dynamic period from 2000 to 2017 during which RE markets for certain technologies evolved considerably, and there was a marked scale-up of WBG activities in the sector. The Show MoreThis report evaluates how effectively the World Bank Group (WBG) has supported clients navigate an evolving market for renewable energy (RE) for supplying electricity to meet energy and environmental needs. It covers a dynamic period from 2000 to 2017 during which RE markets for certain technologies evolved considerably, and there was a marked scale-up of WBG activities in the sector. The evaluation will help determine the ability of WBG to adjust its interventions to rapidly changing conditions and deliver state-of-the-art RE solutions to clients. The evaluation is being undertaken at a time when both the international community and the WBG are placing considerable importance on RE as a key contributor to addressing global climate change. RE, which supports several global development priorities, is vital to achieving inclusive and sustainable economic growth, as per the Forward Look – A Vision for the World Bank Group in 2030. The primary audience for this evaluation is the WBG Board of Executive Directors and WBG management and operational staff. Other key audiences include development partners—especially bilateral donors and other MDBs, special partners—such as GEF, CIFs, and donors who fund ESMAP and ASTAE, WBG clients across governments and in the private sector, civil society organizations and beneficiaries impacted by the WBG’s RE activities.

Grow With the Flow: IEG Evaluation of World Bank Group Support to Facilitating Trade 2006-17

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This potential, however, is often constrained by high transaction costs related to moving goods and providing services across borders which constrain gains from trade. Lower income countries, which are more likely to suffer from high trade costs (and are more likely to face higher costs due to their land-locked, small states or fragile and conflict-affected status), tend to be disproportionately Show MoreThis potential, however, is often constrained by high transaction costs related to moving goods and providing services across borders which constrain gains from trade. Lower income countries, which are more likely to suffer from high trade costs (and are more likely to face higher costs due to their land-locked, small states or fragile and conflict-affected status), tend to be disproportionately hurt. Given the increased client demand for support in the implementation of the TFA, the purpose of this evaluation will be not only to assess the performance of the WBG in this area but also to identify lessons on whether and what needs should be done differently to better support such demand. The analysis will focus on those interventions that support directly trade. The evaluation will contribute to both learning and accountability. The learning aspect of the study will focus on drawing lessons from factors associated with successful and unsuccessful interventions and relating them to the future support provided by the WBG in the implementation of the TFA. With respect to accountability, the study will assess the ways in which WBG support to trade facilitation has achieved its stated objectives, and the extent to which those objectives were aligned with the strategies of the Bank Group, country, and relevant sectors. The primary audiences of this IEG evaluation are the WBG’s Board of Directors, Management and staff. In addition, the findings of the evaluation are expected to be of interest to Senior Management (especially the T&C GP), World Bank, IFC, and MIGA’s staff. The external audience interested in the findings may include WBG clients, partners, and stakeholders such as (i) donors and global and regional bodies involved in private sector development activities and support for trade facilitation; (ii) WBG partner institutions; (iii) non-governmental organizations (NGOs) focused on private sector development and private entities and investors with a substantial engagement in trade and trade facilitation. Depending on their engagement, such stakeholders are expected to benefit from learning about WBG experiences to model their own roles, policies, and engagements to improve competitiveness through facilitating trade

"Cool Markets" for GHG Emission Reduction in a Warming World: Evaluation of World Bank Group’s Support to Carbon Finance (Approach Paper)

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Carbon finance (CF) has been one of the Bank Group’s first and longest engagements for mitigating climate change. Carbon finance as a subcomponent of climate finance is a generic term used for the revenue streams that can be generated by sale of project-based GHG emission reductions or from payments involving carbon sequestration and storage from forests. The World Bank Group launched CF with Show MoreCarbon finance (CF) has been one of the Bank Group’s first and longest engagements for mitigating climate change. Carbon finance as a subcomponent of climate finance is a generic term used for the revenue streams that can be generated by sale of project-based GHG emission reductions or from payments involving carbon sequestration and storage from forests. The World Bank Group launched CF with interest to support development of a global carbon market that will reduce the cost of achieving GHG emission reductions and facilitate sustainable development. The purpose of this evaluation is to assess the role and contributions of the WBG in CF in relation to the needs and priorities of its clients and its potential comparative advantages and draw lessons to inform the WBG’s strategic direction in CF. The evaluation will look at the four dimensions to assess the potential comparative advantages of the WBG in CF. On the WBG portfolio, the focus will only be on the CF portfolio and will not include the broad scope of climate finance. The primary audience for this evaluation is the WBG’s Board of Directors, senior management and staff involved in carbon finance, climate mitigation policy and related operations. Other stakeholders include the donor sponsors providing trust funds to the WBG. These stakeholders will have an incentive to know about the performance and effectiveness of the carbon finance activities, the key drivers of success, how those drivers changed over time, and how future operations can be improved. The evaluation will also be of interest to climate policy evaluation specialists and researchers as well as policymakers and regulatory agencies who want to understand the impact of WBG operations on international carbon finance and how carbon finance operations or similar GHG mitigation policies could be made more effective. Bilateral and multilateral institutions may also be interested to know about what works in carbon finance. Host country governments, civil society and NGOs will also have an interest in this evaluation, especially in terms of how such interventions contribute to reducing GHG emissions and create opportunities for sustainable social and economic development at different levels.

IEG Review of Results and Performance of the World Bank Group 2017 With a Special Focus on Environmental Sustainability (Concept Note)

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Results and Performance of the World Bank Group (RAP) is the annual review of what IEG evaluations reveal about the effectiveness of the World Bank Group (WBG), which includes IBRD/IDA, IFC, and MIGA, in addressing development challenges. The report synthesizes evidence from IEG evaluations and learning products complemented by relevant information from other sources (e.g., WBG corporate Show MoreResults and Performance of the World Bank Group (RAP) is the annual review of what IEG evaluations reveal about the effectiveness of the World Bank Group (WBG), which includes IBRD/IDA, IFC, and MIGA, in addressing development challenges. The report synthesizes evidence from IEG evaluations and learning products complemented by relevant information from other sources (e.g., WBG corporate documents). RAP 2017 will be the eighth in a series that began in 2010, and it is the fifth one since IEG adopted the approach of focusing on a specific theme, “Environmental sustainability”. In this report, IEG will draw on both this work and its body of project level evaluative evidence with additional desk-based analyses to provide an overarching picture of how the WBG is addressing environmental sustainability.

Engaging Citizens for Better Development Results: An IEG Evaluation of World Bank Group Citizen Engagement (Approach Paper)

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This proposed evaluation aims to inform the Board and Management of the World Bank Group on the effectiveness of World Bank Group citizen engagement (CE) activities to support development processes and outcomes. This is the first IEG evaluation that systematically reviews the World Bank Group CE efforts (including IFC and MIGA). CE is the umbrella term adopted by the World Bank Group to denote a Show MoreThis proposed evaluation aims to inform the Board and Management of the World Bank Group on the effectiveness of World Bank Group citizen engagement (CE) activities to support development processes and outcomes. This is the first IEG evaluation that systematically reviews the World Bank Group CE efforts (including IFC and MIGA). CE is the umbrella term adopted by the World Bank Group to denote a multitude of different interactions with a variety of stakeholders—such as government, private sector, and development institutions, including the World Bank Group—at different points in the project or program cycle that give citizens a stake in decision making with the objective of improving development outcomes. It is a two-way relationship that implies the existence of a tangible response to citizens’ feedback.

Evaluation of IFC's Approach to Engaging Clients for Increased Development Impact (Approach Paper)

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The International Finance Corporation’s (IFC) mandate is to promote economic development by supporting the growth of productive private enterprise in its developing member countries--particularly in less developed and higher risk areas--in partnership with private sector clients. IFC’s business model is to work with private sector clients as a means to achieve its mandate of economic development Show MoreThe International Finance Corporation’s (IFC) mandate is to promote economic development by supporting the growth of productive private enterprise in its developing member countries--particularly in less developed and higher risk areas--in partnership with private sector clients. IFC’s business model is to work with private sector clients as a means to achieve its mandate of economic development. In pursuing this mandate, its strategy has evolved and, from the early 2000s, IFC has aimed to transform itself from a transactions-focused to a client-centered institution. The rationale for this shift to a client focus was to improve IFC’s development outcomes. More than a decade after the emergence of IFC’s more strategic approach to client engagement, this evaluation will assess the extent to which IFC’s approach to strategic client engagement have been implemented, enhanced these clients’ project outcomes and helped IFC improve its own development impact. The purpose is to derive appropriate lessons from experience and inform future efforts to improve IFC’s approach to client engagement in given country and client contexts as a means to enhance its development impact. The report is expected to build on internal diagnostics regarding IFC’s business model, which began in March 2016, and would allow IFC to fine tune its strategy related to the client engagement approach. The evaluation is undertaken as part of the second objective of IEG’s results framework regarding generating independent evaluation evidence to assess the early implementation experience of the 2013 WBG Strategy.

An Evaluation of World Bank Group Support to Health Services (Approach Paper)

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Health services (HS) are crucial for development. HS include all services dealing with the diagnosis and treatment of disease, or the promotion, maintenance and restoration of health. They include personal and non-personal health services. Ending extreme poverty and promoting shared prosperity sustainably require, among others, access to social services, including HS. The World Bank Group works Show MoreHealth services (HS) are crucial for development. HS include all services dealing with the diagnosis and treatment of disease, or the promotion, maintenance and restoration of health. They include personal and non-personal health services. Ending extreme poverty and promoting shared prosperity sustainably require, among others, access to social services, including HS. The World Bank Group works with the public and private sectors, and development partners to improve HS in client countries through finance, knowledge and convening services. The purpose of this evaluation is to collect evidence, develop lessons, and propose recommendations that could enhance WBG support to client countries as they move toward universal health coverage.

IEG Results and Performance of the World Bank Group 2016 (Concept Note)

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Results and Performance of the World Bank Group (RAP) is the annual review of what recent IEG evaluations reveal about the effectiveness of the World Bank Group (WBG), which includes IBRD/IDA, IFC, and MIGA, in addressing current and emerging development challenges. The report synthesizes evidence from recent IEG evaluations complemented by relevant information from other sources (e.g., WBG Show MoreResults and Performance of the World Bank Group (RAP) is the annual review of what recent IEG evaluations reveal about the effectiveness of the World Bank Group (WBG), which includes IBRD/IDA, IFC, and MIGA, in addressing current and emerging development challenges. The report synthesizes evidence from recent IEG evaluations complemented by relevant information from other sources (e.g., WBG corporate documents). RAP 2016 will be the seventh in a series that began in 2010 with the consolidation of separate annual reports that IEG prepared for the World Bank (IBRD/IDA), IFC, and MIGA, and it is the fourth one since IEG adopted the approach of focusing on a specific theme. RAP 2015 covered gender integration in the WBG, and the theme for RAP 17 will highlight “Environmental Sustainability.”

Toward a Clean World for All An Evaluation of World Bank Group Support for Pollution Management (Approach Paper)

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Pollution takes an enormous toll, both in terms of impact on healthy lives and environmental degradation—to the extent that it jeopardizes progress made in poverty alleviation. While the 2001 World Bank environment strategy calls for mainstreaming environmental concerns into country development programs, the 2012 World Bank Group environmental strategy, Toward a Green, Clean, and Resilient Show MorePollution takes an enormous toll, both in terms of impact on healthy lives and environmental degradation—to the extent that it jeopardizes progress made in poverty alleviation. While the 2001 World Bank environment strategy calls for mainstreaming environmental concerns into country development programs, the 2012 World Bank Group environmental strategy, Toward a Green, Clean, and Resilient World for All, explicitly defines a “clean world” as a strategic objective—a world with “low pollution and low emission.” The World Bank Group approved a total of 3,870 projects, accounting for approximately US$297 billion in commitments that are pollution-relevant over the last 12 years, FY2004-15. To date, the effectiveness of these interventions has not yet been evaluated. This study will be the first stock-taking exercise focusing on those pollution phenomena that affect poor countries the most, that is, air and water pollution, and waste.