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Topic:Finance, Competitiveness & Innovation
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Creating Markets to Leverage the Private Sector for Sustainable Development and Growth

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Creating Markets to Leverage the Private Sector for Sustainable Development and Growth
With a strong learning focus, this evaluation is intended to inform the implementation of IFC’s corporate strategy (IFC 3.0) and the contributing roles of the World Bank and MIGA to that strategyWith a strong learning focus, this evaluation is intended to inform the implementation of IFC’s corporate strategy (IFC 3.0) and the contributing roles of the World Bank and MIGA to that strategy

North Macedonia CLR Review FY15-18

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The Republic of North Macedonia (North Macedonia) is an upper middle-income country which is small and land-locked. The World Bank Group's (WBG) Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) had two pillars (or focus areas): (i) growth and competitiveness, and (ii) skills and inclusion. The CPS was broadly aligned with the government's 2014-2018 program, which sought increased growth and employment, Show MoreThe Republic of North Macedonia (North Macedonia) is an upper middle-income country which is small and land-locked. The World Bank Group's (WBG) Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) had two pillars (or focus areas): (i) growth and competitiveness, and (ii) skills and inclusion. The CPS was broadly aligned with the government's 2014-2018 program, which sought increased growth and employment, international integration, reduced corruption and more efficient law enforcement, better inter-ethnic relations, and investments in education, innovation and technology. Specifically, the CPS supported the growth and employment, infrastructure, social protection, and education pillars of the Government's program and the government's efforts to stabilize public debt. The European Union (EU) accession agenda was a cross-cutting theme in the CPS. At the PLR stage, the CPS maintained its overall focus, albeit with some changes in emphasis, and was aligned with the new Government program (2017-20) that focused on growth, jobs, and social protection, among other areas.

Zambia CLR Review FY13-17

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The review of Zambia’s completion and learning review (CLR) of the World Bank Group’s (WBG) country partnership strategy (CPS) covers the period FY13-FY17. The WBG’s CPS had three focus areas: (a) reducing poverty and vulnerability of the poor; (b) improving competitiveness and infrastructure for growth and employment; and (c) improving governance and strengthening economic management. Cross- Show MoreThe review of Zambia’s completion and learning review (CLR) of the World Bank Group’s (WBG) country partnership strategy (CPS) covers the period FY13-FY17. The WBG’s CPS had three focus areas: (a) reducing poverty and vulnerability of the poor; (b) improving competitiveness and infrastructure for growth and employment; and (c) improving governance and strengthening economic management. Cross-cutting elements included regional integration, strengthening institutional capacity, and addressing governance, gender, and climate change challenges. The CPS was aligned with the government’s sixth national development plan 2013-2016, which aimed to accelerate infrastructure development and economic diversification, promote rural investment, accelerate poverty reduction, and enhance human development. Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) rates the CPS development outcome moderately unsatisfactory. The CLRR agrees with the CLR lessons as specified: (a) collaboration and coordination among stakeholders is critical to improving portfolio quality, (b) the number and design of projects should consider implementation capacity of the country and supervision capacity of the WBG, (c) WBG projects should be reflected in, and aligned with, the government program, (d) the WB can be effective in strengthening institutions at the local level, and (e) incorporating accountability measures in project designs promotes good governance, transparency, and oversight.

Paraguay CLR Review FY15-18

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Paraguay - Completion and Learning Review for the Period FY15-FY18 : IEG Review (English) Paraguay is an upper middle-income country with a population of 6.8 million (2017) and a GNI per capita (Atlas method) of USD 3,920 in 2017.The population is very young (60 percent under thirty years old) and the country is going through a rapid urbanization process from a low base. The country has over Show MoreParaguay - Completion and Learning Review for the Period FY15-FY18 : IEG Review (English) Paraguay is an upper middle-income country with a population of 6.8 million (2017) and a GNI per capita (Atlas method) of USD 3,920 in 2017.The population is very young (60 percent under thirty years old) and the country is going through a rapid urbanization process from a low base. The country has over the last 15 years achieved solid economic growth (average GDP growth of 4.7 percent per annum) and improved shared prosperity, spurred by abundant natural resources. The CPS for the World Bank Group (WBG) had three pillars (or focus areas): (i) resilience to risks and volatility; (ii) pro-poor delivery of public goods and services; and (iii) agricultural productivity and market integration. The Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) focus areas and objectives were broadly aligned with the government's National Development Plan (NDP) 2014-2030 and supported the NDP's higher level objective to reduce extreme poverty and foster income growth of the bottom 40 percent. The WBG's program components were well aligned with the NDP and addressed important development issues. The program was selective with three focus areas and eight objectives (some of which, however, contained multiple sub-objectives). The Bank demonstrated flexibility by shifting to knowledge services when the demand for IBRD lending dropped in the run-up to the election. However, the results framework had significant shortcomings which were not fully addressed at the PLR stage. The Completion and Learning Review (CLR) highlighted six lessons with which IEG concurs: (i) simplicity in project design helps speed up project implementation; (ii) investment projects may help to build governance and capacity; (iii) a realistic results framework is needed for timely achievement of objectives; (iv) a strong ASA program requires selectivity and government ownership; (v) RASs may help prioritize ASA demand and advance reforms during Paraguay's long project preparation cycles; and (vi) the flexibility afforded by programmatic ASA helps respond to changes in client needs.

Albania Country Program Evaluation

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The primary goal of the evaluation is to assess the Bank Group’s development effectiveness in Albania during the period FY11-19 and to inform the design and implementation of its future activities in Albania. The Country Program Evaluation (CPE) will place strong emphasis on assessing World Bank Group strategic positioning and program delivery to help Albania achieve its development goals, Show MoreThe primary goal of the evaluation is to assess the Bank Group’s development effectiveness in Albania during the period FY11-19 and to inform the design and implementation of its future activities in Albania. The Country Program Evaluation (CPE) will place strong emphasis on assessing World Bank Group strategic positioning and program delivery to help Albania achieve its development goals, notably that of European Union (EU) accession. The selection of Albania is motivated by the important challenges the country has faced since the 2008 financial crisis in sustaining the major development gains achieved following the opening of the economy in the early 1990s. The report seeks to provide inputs for the next Country Partnership Framework (CPF), scheduled for Board discussion in FY21. While the CPE is primarily aimed at informing future WBG support to Albania, the evaluation findings are expected to provide lessons for WBG programs in countries that share similar characteristics and aspirations—for example, other small-size, middleincome countries seeking to achieve high rates of growth and poverty reduction, facing the challenge of employment creation, or aspiring to join the EU.

Burkina Faso: Growth and Competitiveness Credits 1-4 (PPAR)

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This Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) evaluates the Growth and Competitiveness Credit Development Policy Financing series (I–IV) implemented in Burkina Faso between 2012 and 2015. The total cost of the four operations was $359 million equivalent. The first operation was approved by the Board of the International Development Association (IDA) on June 26, 2012, and the last on April 2, Show MoreThis Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) evaluates the Growth and Competitiveness Credit Development Policy Financing series (I–IV) implemented in Burkina Faso between 2012 and 2015. The total cost of the four operations was $359 million equivalent. The first operation was approved by the Board of the International Development Association (IDA) on June 26, 2012, and the last on April 2, 2015. The series closed on December 31, 2015. The Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) prepared the report based on interviews, a review of World Bank files, and documents and data collected during a field visit to Burkina Faso in November 2017. The mission met with World Bank staff, government officials, beneficiaries of the reforms, donors, academia, and civil society groups. The evaluation also draws from interviews with the task team leaders and country manager of Burkina Faso. The series followed 11 budget support operations of the Poverty Reduction Support Credits and Grants 1–11 in Burkina Faso and was the only type of development policy operation financed by IDA resources during the period.

Romania CLR Review FY14-18

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This review of the World Bank Group’s Completion and Learning Report (CLR) covers the Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) and the Performance and Learning Review (PLR) dated November 3, 2016. The original CPS period (FY14-17) was at the PLR stage extended by one year to cover FY14-18. The CLR and this review cover this extended period. Romania is an upper middle-income country with a GNI per Show MoreThis review of the World Bank Group’s Completion and Learning Report (CLR) covers the Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) and the Performance and Learning Review (PLR) dated November 3, 2016. The original CPS period (FY14-17) was at the PLR stage extended by one year to cover FY14-18. The CLR and this review cover this extended period. Romania is an upper middle-income country with a GNI per capita of $9,480 in 2016 and a population of 19.7 million. Romania’s per capita GDP had grown rapidly up to 2009, reducing poverty, but the global financial crisis of 2008 triggered a severe recession. The IMF Article IV report (May 2017) notes that Romania strengthened its economy considerably after the global financial crisis. Romania registered an average annual GDP growth of 3.9 percent during the review period (2014-2016). Public debt and fiscal and current account imbalances are moderate compared to many emerging markets, but significant challenges remain and the momentum of progress in policies has waned. Income convergence with the EU has slowed and poverty is among the highest in the EU. Romania has a Human Development Index (HDI) of .802 in 2015, placing the country in the very high human development category and ranking 50 (of 188) in HDI in 2015. Its Gini coefficient is 28.3 in 2016 (from around 35 in 2010) and its poverty headcount ratio based on the national poverty line is 25.4 percent (average 2014-2016).

Maximizing the Impact of Development Policy Financing in IDA Countries: A Stocktaking of Success Factors and Risks - An IEG Meso Evaluation

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Development policy financing (DPF) has evolved from supporting structural adjustment programs in the 1980s and 1990s to supporting the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in the 2000s. It has been considered by multilateral and bilateral donors as one of the instruments that would best enable the realization of the Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness. However, the use of Show MoreDevelopment policy financing (DPF) has evolved from supporting structural adjustment programs in the 1980s and 1990s to supporting the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in the 2000s. It has been considered by multilateral and bilateral donors as one of the instruments that would best enable the realization of the Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness. However, the use of budget support as a preferred aid modality has been diminishing, especially among European member states. This evaluation is expected to inform decisions on the use of Development Policy Financing (DPF) in IDA countries by providing evaluative insights into drivers of success and risks. This is pertinent in the context of the record replenishment for IDA18 in the face of a declining share of DPF in IDA commitments during the last three IDA cycles. In this context, it is worthwhile to examine the factors that have driven DPF success in the past so as to inform decisions on the role of this development financing instrument in IDA countries going forward.

Engaging Clients for Increased Development Impact: What has IFC Learned

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Engaging Clients for Increased Development Impact: What has IFC Learned
Join this panel of experts as they discuss how to build on lessons learned after a decade of implementing IFC’s client engagement approach, especially in the context of IFC’s current focus on creating markets and maximizing finance for development. Join this panel of experts as they discuss how to build on lessons learned after a decade of implementing IFC’s client engagement approach, especially in the context of IFC’s current focus on creating markets and maximizing finance for development.

Public Finance for Development Evaluation (Approach Paper)

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Sound public finance policies, institutions and outcomes are critical for making fast and sustained progress toward theWorld Bank Group’s twin goals of eradicating extreme poverty and promoting shared prosperity. Public finance encompasses the overall fiscal stance of the government, how governments collect revenues and manage expenditures, and the institutions that enable those outcomes. This Show MoreSound public finance policies, institutions and outcomes are critical for making fast and sustained progress toward theWorld Bank Group’s twin goals of eradicating extreme poverty and promoting shared prosperity. Public finance encompasses the overall fiscal stance of the government, how governments collect revenues and manage expenditures, and the institutions that enable those outcomes. This evaluation aims at assessing the development effectiveness of World Bank activities in public finance support during the period FY08–17, ranging from analytical work to financing and the use of the World Bank’s convening power. The evaluation is meant to contribute to the two primary purposes of evaluation at the World Bank: to promote accountability for delivering on the World Bank’s mandate through the assessment of performance and results in the area of public finance; and to promote learning within the World Bank and with its clients to inform the design and implementation of future interventions in an area that is of high and arguably growing importance for achieving improved development outcomes.