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Topic:Finance, Competitiveness & Innovation
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Liberia: Integrated Public Financial Management Reform Project (PPAR)

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The project development objective of the Liberia Integrated Public Financial Management Reform Project (IPFMRP) was to improve the budget coverage, fiscal policy management, financial control, and oversight of government finances of the recipient. The project was restructured in 2016, but the project development objective remained unchanged. Four subobjectives are assessed for this review: (i) Show MoreThe project development objective of the Liberia Integrated Public Financial Management Reform Project (IPFMRP) was to improve the budget coverage, fiscal policy management, financial control, and oversight of government finances of the recipient. The project was restructured in 2016, but the project development objective remained unchanged. Four subobjectives are assessed for this review: (i) improve budget coverage, (ii) improve fiscal policy management, (iii) improve financial control, and (iv) improve oversight of government finances. Ratings for the Integrated Public Financial Management Reform Project are as follows: Outcome was moderately unsatisfactory, Overall efficacy is modest, Risk to development outcome was substantial, Bank performance is moderately unsatisfactory, and Quality of monitoring and evaluation is negligible. Lessons from this project include: (i) Effective support for enhancing revenue mobilization and administration can benefit from combining technical assistance with logistical support. (ii) The use of PEFA composite indicators as results indicators is often not advisable. (iii) Superficial reviews and overoptimistic ratings in ISRs can negatively affect project implementation and outcomes. (iv) Effective and sustainable PFM reforms require continuous engagement to overcome political challenges.

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An Evaluation of World Bank Group Support to the Reform of State-Owned Enterprises, FY08-18
This is IEG’s first systematic assessment of World Bank Group’s support for the reform of State-Owned Enterprises (SOEs), looking at what works and the factors of success. It parallels Bank Group efforts to provide more integrated support to SOE reform in client countries and to empower staff with new tools. This is IEG’s first systematic assessment of World Bank Group’s support for the reform of State-Owned Enterprises (SOEs), looking at what works and the factors of success. It parallels Bank Group efforts to provide more integrated support to SOE reform in client countries and to empower staff with new tools.

Ukraine Country Program Evaluation (Approach Paper)

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Ukraine has significant economic potential, but over the past decade economic growth has been slow and highly volatile. A lower-middle-income country with a population of 44 million and a per-capita gross national income of $2,660 in 2018, Ukraine is endowed with a well-educated and entrepreneurial population, vast areas of fertile land, other natural resources, and a geographic location at the Show MoreUkraine has significant economic potential, but over the past decade economic growth has been slow and highly volatile. A lower-middle-income country with a population of 44 million and a per-capita gross national income of $2,660 in 2018, Ukraine is endowed with a well-educated and entrepreneurial population, vast areas of fertile land, other natural resources, and a geographic location at the crossroads of Europe and Asia.2 Ukraine aspires to join the European Union (EU), but after decades of stagnation, income per capita remains far below that of its neighbors and comparators. The primary goal of this Country Program Evaluation (CPE) is to assess the development effectiveness of World Bank Group support to Ukraine between fiscal years (FY)12 and FY20. A key focus of the CPE will be to examine how well the Bank Group adapted its support to Ukraine’s changing circumstances over the evaluation period and helped build resilience in the face of major crises. The CPE is also expected to provide strategic insights for the preparation of the next Ukraine Country Partnership Framework (CPF), scheduled for FY22.

Tajikistan: Energy Loss Reduction Project (PPAR)

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This project was approved on June 30, 2005, for a cost of $30.0 million, including an International Development Association credit of $17.9 million. The project cost increased to $48 million after restructuring and additional finance of $18.0 million. The project closed on December 31, 2014, two and a half years later than the originally scheduled date of June 30, 2012. The original objective was Show MoreThis project was approved on June 30, 2005, for a cost of $30.0 million, including an International Development Association credit of $17.9 million. The project cost increased to $48 million after restructuring and additional finance of $18.0 million. The project closed on December 31, 2014, two and a half years later than the originally scheduled date of June 30, 2012. The original objective was, to assist [Tajikistan] in reducing commercial losses in the electricity and gas systems, and to lay the foundation for the improvement of the financial viability of the electricity and gas utilities in a socially responsible manner. In 2012, the project objective was expanded to include, to assist in the viability assessment of the proposed Rogun HEP [hydroelectric project] in Tajikistan. Ratings for the Energy Loss Reduction Project are as follows: Outcome was moderately unsatisfactory, Risk to development outcome was high, Bank performance was unsatisfactory, and Borrower performance was moderately unsatisfactory. Lessons from this project include: (i) The development effectiveness of the World Bank’s continuous sectorwide engagement in a country can be diminished significantly if the risk analysis at project appraisal is not comprehensive and candid and if prompt course corrections are not made during implementation when a major risk is realized. (ii) The World Bank should proactively ensure that a project component that is crucial to achieving the project development objective and is funded through parallel financing arrangements is designed and implemented in an effective and complementary manner. (iii) The World Bank’s convening capacity can contribute to resolving politically complex and technically demanding development issues that cut across national boundaries, by creating a transparent and inclusive consultative process, and marshaling globally recognized expertise.

Rwanda CLR Review FY14-20

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In summary, under the Rwanda CPS for FY14-FY20, the World Bank Group supported the government to address problems in areas and sectors that could help reduce poverty and improve shared prosperity. The CLR’s most relevant lessons are summarized as follows. First, government discipline and leadership enhance the effectiveness of official development assistance and the country’s ability to progress Show MoreIn summary, under the Rwanda CPS for FY14-FY20, the World Bank Group supported the government to address problems in areas and sectors that could help reduce poverty and improve shared prosperity. The CLR’s most relevant lessons are summarized as follows. First, government discipline and leadership enhance the effectiveness of official development assistance and the country’s ability to progress. Second, more qualified people working on financial management, procurement and safeguards is needed to enhance the impact of projects and program. Third, plans for agricultural modernization require considering interactions between the rural and urban labor markets to ensure migrating rural workers have gainful urban employment. Fourth, generating knowledge through ASA can help identify binding constraints and design policy reforms in a timely manner. IEG adds the following lesson: Poor results framework make it difficult to learn from a program’s experience, attribute results to the program and assess its achievements, and build knowledge that can guide future program design and implementation. To assess programs, build knowledge and guide future actions, the WBG needs to ensure CPF Results Frameworks have: (a) a clear and coherent results chain and (b) indicators that can be measured, are useful for assessing the achievement of objectives and are linked to the program’s interventions.. In Rwanda, the CPS results framework has shortcomings that makes it difficult to measure the achievement of some objectives, build knowledge and guide future WBG programs.

Pakistan: First and Second Programmatic Fiscally Sustainable and Inclusive Growth Development Policy Credit (PPAR)

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This Project Performance Assessment Report evaluates a programmatic series of two development policy operations for Pakistan. The series was the World Bank’s first policy-based operation in Pakistan in more than a decade. The project development objective was to (a) foster private and financial sector development to bolster economic growth, and (b) mobilize revenue while expanding fiscal space to Show MoreThis Project Performance Assessment Report evaluates a programmatic series of two development policy operations for Pakistan. The series was the World Bank’s first policy-based operation in Pakistan in more than a decade. The project development objective was to (a) foster private and financial sector development to bolster economic growth, and (b) mobilize revenue while expanding fiscal space to priority social needs”. The objective was matched by two policy areas. The first policy area covered reforming trade tariffs, privatizing state-owned enterprises, improving business registration, developing the microinsurance sector, and improving the availability of credit information. The second policy area covered improving revenue performance and enhancing the social safety net program. Ratings for the First and Second Programmatic Fiscally Sustainable and Inclusive Growth Development Policy Credits are as follows: Outcome was moderately satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was high, Bank performance was moderately satisfactory, Borrower performance was moderately unsatisfactory, and Quality of M&E was modest. This PPAR offers the following lessons: (i) In Pakistan, the World Bank reengagement with development policy lending after a long break benefited from a longer-term strategy (or program) that provides for several interrelated DPCs, a large and relevant technical assistance program, and close cooperation with the IMF. (ii) Dividing important sectoral issues among separate operations could be an effective strategy when the government is facing multiple reform challenges. (iii) Political economy analysis and communication support related to politically sensitive reforms were insufficient.

Myanmar – Completion and Learning Report : IEG Review

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This review of the World Bank Group’s (WBG) Completion and Learning Review (CLR) covers the period of the Country Partnership Framework (CPF), FY15-FY17, and updated in the Performance and Learning Review (PLR) dated June 2, 2017, which extended the CPF period by two years to FY19. This CPF followed the end-2012 Interim Strategy Note (ISN) that resumed WBG operations after a hiatus of about 25 Show MoreThis review of the World Bank Group’s (WBG) Completion and Learning Review (CLR) covers the period of the Country Partnership Framework (CPF), FY15-FY17, and updated in the Performance and Learning Review (PLR) dated June 2, 2017, which extended the CPF period by two years to FY19. This CPF followed the end-2012 Interim Strategy Note (ISN) that resumed WBG operations after a hiatus of about 25 years. To support the Government’s development efforts, the WBG implemented a major expansion of its activities (a seven-fold increase in the Bank’s portfolio), possibly beyond what the country could absorb. Nevertheless, this support contributed to good progress on farming productivity; on access to electricity, telecommunications, health, education, and finance; and on the business climate. IEG agrees with the lessons drawn by the CLR. These are reformulated and summarized as follows: (i) In an environment of constrained implementation capacity, projects with diverse objectives and multiple implementing agencies may become unwieldy and lead to delays in project implementation. (ii) A results framework that excludes the program’s cross-cutting issues will impede assessment of success in addressing these issues. (iii) Use of country systems, support of key reform champions, and joint analytical work are among the factors that build trust with counterparts and stakeholders. (iv) Access to and coordination of trust fund resources will encourage effective implementation and collaboration across development partners. (v) Good and timely data is critical for evidence-based policy dialogue and timely response to country developments. (vi) A “one WBG” approach is critical to leverage WBG instruments toward specific objectives such as access to electricity. Seventh, more careful attention to indicators, including their sources, baselines, targets and time frames will facilitate program monitoring. (vii) A “disconnect’ between written implementation rules and actual practices in Myanmar, e.g., on procurement, may cause implementation delays. IEG adds the following lesson: Joint Implementation Plans (JIPs5) can improve the effectiveness of the “one WBG” approach noted by the CLR lessons. WBG CPFs normally intend collaboration across the Bank, IFC, and MIGA, but more often than not, CPFs do not spell out how such collaboration is to happen. Myanmar’s CPF JIP to improve access to electricity helped ensure that joint work would materialize. IEG rates the CPF development outcome as Moderately Satisfactory and WBG performance as Good.

World Bank Group Support to International Development Association Countries for Integration into Global Value Chains (Approach Paper)

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The rise of global value chains (GVCs) in the past two decades has dramatically altered the world economy. Lower transport and communication costs and falling barriers to trade have allowed firms to organize production processes into discrete tasks that can be performed in different countries. This has given rise to a finer international division of labor and greater gains from specialization, Show MoreThe rise of global value chains (GVCs) in the past two decades has dramatically altered the world economy. Lower transport and communication costs and falling barriers to trade have allowed firms to organize production processes into discrete tasks that can be performed in different countries. This has given rise to a finer international division of labor and greater gains from specialization, which opens opportunities for developing countries to participate in global production networks without having to master the entire production process. About 80 percent of global trade occurs through GVCs (UNCTAD 2013). Integration into GVCs helped many fast-growing economies increase exports, create jobs, acquire technologies, develop skills, and improve productivity. These countries have experienced the steepest declines in poverty (WTO 2017). The purpose of this evaluation is to shed light on what worked and why in Bank Group support to IDA countries’ efforts to enhance integration into GVCs. To this end, the evaluation will (i) take stock of Bank Group engagement with IDA countries on GVCs, (ii) assess the contribution of Bank Group support to enhancing GVC participation and benefits, and (iii) identify the main factors that have influenced the Bank Group’s ability to contribute to GVC-related outcomes.

Bangladesh: Strengthening Public Expenditure Management Program - Strengthening Auditor General’s Office (PPAR)

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This is a Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) by the Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) of the World Bank’s project on Bangladesh: Strengthening Auditor General’s Office. The project was selected as part of a pilot initiative by IEG to improve the relevance of the instrument. The PPAR draws lessons from the World Bank’s experience in the context of a challenging public financial Show MoreThis is a Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) by the Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) of the World Bank’s project on Bangladesh: Strengthening Auditor General’s Office. The project was selected as part of a pilot initiative by IEG to improve the relevance of the instrument. The PPAR draws lessons from the World Bank’s experience in the context of a challenging public financial management, governance, and political economy environment. The original project development objectives were to (i) strengthen the institutional arrangements of the Office of the Comptroller and Auditor General (OCAG), (ii) enhance the quality and scope of audits, and (iii) enhance the institutional capacity of the Financial Management Academy (FIMA). Reflecting government reluctance to enact the underlying legal changes required by the operation, the project development objectives were revised in 2014 to (i) strengthen the quality, scope, and follow-up of audits; and (ii) create a cadre of internationally accredited professionals in OCAG. Ratings for the Strengthening Public Expenditure Management Program - Strengthening Auditor General’s Office project are as follows: Outcome was moderately satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was substantial, Bank performance was moderately unsatisfactory, and Borrower performance was moderately unsatisfactory. Lesson from the project include: (1) Inadequate assessment of political economy risks to key reforms contributed to unrealistically ambitious project design and targets, leading to shortcomings in implementation. (ii) The project sought to implement a politically sensitive policy reform through the use of technical assistance. The objective could have been more effectively pursued through a different instrument, possibly a development policy operation. (iii) The ability for a pilot to effectively demonstrate the potential of a new way of doing business requires commitment to a systematic assessment of the pilot experience and the dissemination of lessons learned.

Mongolia: Governance Assistance Project (PPAR)

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This Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) evaluates the Governance Assistance Project (GAP) of the International Development Association (IDA) in Mongolia (P170780). The project was approved in March 2006 in the amount of special drawing rights 9.7 million (equivalent to US$14 million), funded by an IDA grant. Following two extensions, it closed on December 31, 2014. This assessment aims Show MoreThis Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) evaluates the Governance Assistance Project (GAP) of the International Development Association (IDA) in Mongolia (P170780). The project was approved in March 2006 in the amount of special drawing rights 9.7 million (equivalent to US$14 million), funded by an IDA grant. Following two extensions, it closed on December 31, 2014. This assessment aims to review whether and how the operation achieved its intended objectives. The PPAR also examines the long-term sustainability of GAP support, such as the extent to which the GAP’s main achievements have been sustained more than four years since the project’s closure. This report provides additional evidence and analysis of relevant data for a more complete picture of the project outcomes and the factors that influenced them. By reviewing developments from 2014 to 2019 (after the project closed), it offers an opportunity for a longer-term perspective on the factors affecting outcomes. Ratings for this project are as follows: Outcome as satisfactory, risk to development outcome was modest, bank performance was moderately satisfactory, and borrower performance was moderately satisfactory. This PPAR offers the following lessons: (i) In a low-capacity environment, introduction of basic technical solutions and application of incremental step-by-step reforms can be an effective strategy. (ii) Implementation risks related to project complexity and multiple government implementing agencies can be successfully managed if there is strong leadership from the core government agency (such as the Ministry of Finance) and an experienced and empowered Project Coordination Unit. (iii) Technical assistance projects with multisectoral coverage require significant supervision support. Lack of budget can limit the ability of the World Bank to provide the specialized technical inputs needed to help the client make better design and implementation choices.