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Topic:Evaluation Capacity Development
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New Collaboration to Address Global Gaps in Monitoring and Evaluation Capacity

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New Collaboration to Address Global Gaps in Monitoring and Evaluation Capacity
For information, contact William Stebbins email: wstebbins@worldbank.org | tel: +1 (202) 458-7883   New York City, NY, January 13, 2020 – The World Bank’s Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) and the Independent Evaluation Office of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) today marking the first step towards establishing a global partnership Show MoreFor information, contact William Stebbins email: wstebbins@worldbank.org | tel: +1 (202) 458-7883   New York City, NY, January 13, 2020 – The World Bank’s Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) and the Independent Evaluation Office of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) today marking the first step towards establishing a global partnership to support evaluation capacity development. The IEG-UNDP collaboration comes at a time when the global demand for support to strengthen monitoring and evaluation (M&E) systems and capacities is high. Countries need effective M&E systems and capacities in order to track the progress on their national development strategies. The support to meet this demand, while growing, is often limited by scale and a lack of coordination. As part of this new collaboration, IEG and UNDP aim to pool resources, share knowledge and expertise, and leverage the comparative advantages of each institution for scaling up current initiatives and coordinating global efforts on building M&E systems and capacity. “This collaboration comes at a pivotal moment, as the ten-year countdown toward the Sustainable Development Goals begins,” said Indran Naidoo, UNDP Director of the Independent Evaluation Office. “Effective systems of monitoring and evaluation are critical for reaching the goals, as they allow countries to base policies on what has proven to work, and to monitor their progress to ensure no one is left behind.” “No single institution has the resources to address the current global gaps in monitoring and evaluation capacity,” said Alison Evans, World Bank Vice President and IEG Director-General. “Addressing the scale of the need will require coordinated efforts by broad coalitions, and this collaboration is a step in that direction, providing a foundation that can be built on.”  Along with coordinating activities and sharing resources, the two organizations will seek to expand their collaboration globally to include the range of countries and institutions involved in developing the capacity for monitoring and evaluation.   Read more about the current challenges in global M&E capacity and the need for joint action in a recent #WhatWorks blog post by IEG Director-General Alison Evans.   

A Pivotal Year for Monitoring and Evaluation

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A Pivotal Year for Monitoring and Evaluation
Building and improving monitoring and evaluation capacity worldwide is key to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals within ten years. Building and improving monitoring and evaluation capacity worldwide is key to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals within ten years.

Are evaluators ready to answer the question: Who benefits?

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Are evaluators ready to answer the question: Who benefits?
Recent trends in evaluation indicate institutions and systems are evolving, driven by an acknowledgment of the importance of addressing key questions.Recent trends in evaluation indicate institutions and systems are evolving, driven by an acknowledgment of the importance of addressing key questions.

From what works to how, and for whom

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From what works to how, and for whom
How we can better connect evaluation and evidence to meaningful outcomes.How we can better connect evaluation and evidence to meaningful outcomes.

Measuring up: When “what works” doesn’t

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Measuring Up: When “What Works” Doesn’t
What an essay about closing the achievement gap in US public schools tells us about “what works” in international developmentWhat an essay about closing the achievement gap in US public schools tells us about “what works” in international development

World Bank Group Evaluation Principles

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This document, World Bank Group Evaluation Principles, sets out core principles for evaluation as well as underlying principles for selecting, conducting, and using evaluations, as relevant to the World Bank Group’s mission, and each institution’s mandate, system of governance, and operating environment. It is informed by international evaluation principles and good practice standards and builds Show MoreThis document, World Bank Group Evaluation Principles, sets out core principles for evaluation as well as underlying principles for selecting, conducting, and using evaluations, as relevant to the World Bank Group’s mission, and each institution’s mandate, system of governance, and operating environment. It is informed by international evaluation principles and good practice standards and builds on knowledge of current practices and processes around evaluation in the World Bank Group. In agreeing to this common set of principles, we aim to enhance development results by strengthening accountability and learning through evaluation.

IEG Work Program and Budget (FY20) and Indicative Plan (FY21-22)

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To maximize its relevance and value added for the World Bank Group (WBG), IEG will align its work program with WBG strategic priorities. IEG also aims to maintain a clear line of sight with the WBG mission and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), as well as with commitments made in the IBRD and IFC Capital Packages and in the context of IDA replenishments. Furthermore, IEG will keep an Show MoreTo maximize its relevance and value added for the World Bank Group (WBG), IEG will align its work program with WBG strategic priorities. IEG also aims to maintain a clear line of sight with the WBG mission and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), as well as with commitments made in the IBRD and IFC Capital Packages and in the context of IDA replenishments. Furthermore, IEG will keep an increased focus on outcomes, countries, clients, and beneficiaries in its work, and aim to foster a greater outcome orientation throughout the WBG. To achieve this strategic vision, IEG will focus its work program on the key development effectiveness questions that the institution and its clients are most concerned about. For each of these questions, we will strive to answer “why”, “how, “where”, “when”, and “for whom” specific interventions or programs have achieved results or not. By working more closely with operational units and other evaluation initiatives across the WBG, we will seek to significantly enhance IEG’s value added for the Board and WBG management. The work program will be anchored around a series of “streams”, building evidence over time on connected themes and trying to bridge between project, country, sector and strategic impact: Fragility, Conflict and Violence (FCV), Gender, Maximizing Finance for Development, Human Capital, Climate Change, Growth and Transformation. In addition, IEG will work along an ‘effectiveness’ cross-cutting stream, aimed at examining systemic issues in WBG effectiveness, as well as working towards building a stronger outcome focus for WBG operations and strategies.

Taking Evaluative Evidence (well) Into the 21st Century

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IEG's contribution to gLOCAL Evaluation Week includes one session, "Advances in Evaluative Evidence", and one course, "Using Geospatial Data for Evaluation".IEG's contribution to gLOCAL Evaluation Week includes one session, "Advances in Evaluative Evidence", and one course, "Using Geospatial Data for Evaluation".

Heeding Hirschman in evaluation: finding out fast versus finding out slow

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Heeding Hirschman in evaluation: finding out fast versus finding out slow
How evaluators can counteract potential threats to validity in the face of complexity and practical constraints.How evaluators can counteract potential threats to validity in the face of complexity and practical constraints.

Collateral damage: the pitfalls of quantitative measures of success

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Collateral damage the pitfalls of quantitative measures of success
An evaluator’s perspective on "Weapons of Math Destruction"An evaluator’s perspective on "Weapons of Math Destruction"