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Conversations: What More Can the World Bank Group Do to Support Environmental Sustainability?

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What More Can the World Bank Group Do to Support Environmental Sustainability
Excerpts from a panel discussion about the how the Bank Group has mainstreamed and measured projects with potential environmental benefits.Excerpts from a panel discussion about the how the Bank Group has mainstreamed and measured projects with potential environmental benefits.

Kyrgyz Republic CLR Review FY14-17

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The Kyrgyz Republic is a lower middle-income country with a GNI per capita of $1,100 in 2016. It is a country with a land-locked and mountainous geography, and rich in mineral and water resources. GDP growth averaged 3.7 percent during the CPS period (2014-17), somewhat below the average during the previous four years (4.0 percent). Gold production and worker remittances have been significant Show MoreThe Kyrgyz Republic is a lower middle-income country with a GNI per capita of $1,100 in 2016. It is a country with a land-locked and mountainous geography, and rich in mineral and water resources. GDP growth averaged 3.7 percent during the CPS period (2014-17), somewhat below the average during the previous four years (4.0 percent). Gold production and worker remittances have been significant drivers of growth, but are subject to volatility and do not lend themselves to sustained growth. Growth helped reduce poverty rates, from the recent peak of 38.0 percent in 2012 to 25.4 percent in 2015. Nevertheless, the country’s Human Development Index improved slightly from 0.656 in 2013 (ranked 125nd among 187 countries) to 0.664 in 2015 (ranked 120th among 188 countries). Inequality (the GINI Index) declined from 28.8 in 2013 to 26.8 in 2016, Policy effectiveness has been undermined by high levels of corruption and frequent changes in Government. Kyrgyz’s rank in Transparency International’s Corruption Perception Index deteriorated from 123rd of 167 in 2015 to 135th of 167 in 2017. During the CPS period, there were five different prime ministers. The World Bank Group’s (WBG) CPS had three pillars (or focus areas): (i) public administration and public service delivery, (ii) business environment and investment climate, and (iii) natural resources and physical infrastructure. The CPS was aligned with the Government’s National Sustainable Development Strategy (NSDS), 2013-2017, specifically with NSDS objectives on public administration, judiciary, social services, financial and private sector development, agribusiness, exports, environmental protection/resource management, energy, transport, and urban development. These objectives were part of the NSDS broad focus on governance, state building, and economic development. WBG’s support was also aligned with a number of specific government programs (e.g., the Governance and Anti-Corruption Plan adopted in 2012).

Armenia: Municipal Water Project (PPAR)

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Armenia enjoys abundant water resources averaging 10.2 billion m3 per year, of which 2.4 billion are used for drinking water. Drinking water is provided by five state water companies1. Demands on water production are high because of excessive levels of non-revenue water (NRW) of up to 85 percent. In 2012, at the time of the appraisal of the Municipal Water Project (MWP), Armenia had recorded Show MoreArmenia enjoys abundant water resources averaging 10.2 billion m3 per year, of which 2.4 billion are used for drinking water. Drinking water is provided by five state water companies1. Demands on water production are high because of excessive levels of non-revenue water (NRW) of up to 85 percent. In 2012, at the time of the appraisal of the Municipal Water Project (MWP), Armenia had recorded significant legislative and institutional achievements in terms of water resources management in cooperation with international institutions, including the World Bank. The water sector reforms were aimed at decentralizing the water resources management function for the benefit of water users and best use of water resources. However, water tariffs have been low since 20092 and revenues insufficient for asset rehabilitation to reduce NRW. The MWP’s project development objective (PDO) was to support improvement of the quality and availability of the water supply in selected areas of the Armenia Water and Sewerage Company (AWSC)—a state water company owned by the State Committee of Water Economy (SCWE). Ratings for the Municipal Water Project are as follows: Outcome is moderately satisfactory, Risk to development outcome is high, Bank performance is moderately satisfactory, and Borrower performance is moderately satisfactory. In terms of lessons, the implementation of the MWP suggests the following: (i) The sustainability of development outcomes is enhanced when the World Bank maintains its strategic and operational engagement over time, especially when social and political risks are high. (ii) The World Bank’s continuous advice and technical assistance, provided in parallel with lending and in coordination with other donors, can result in effective partnership with the government and the private sector. (iii) Tailoring the Enhanced Management Contract to the conditions of the local service area can help achieve results.

A Thirst for Change: The World Bank Group’s Support for Water Supply and Sanitation

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A Thirst for Change
Watch a re-play of the live event - a discussion about how well the Bank Group is equipped to support countries in moving toward SDG 6- which seeks to “ensure access to water and sanitation for all” by 2030- with a particular focus on the financial viability and accountability of service providers. Watch a re-play of the live event - a discussion about how well the Bank Group is equipped to support countries in moving toward SDG 6- which seeks to “ensure access to water and sanitation for all” by 2030- with a particular focus on the financial viability and accountability of service providers.

2.4 billion Without Adequate Sanitation. 600 million Without Safe Water. Can We Fix it by 2030?

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Can we bridge the water and sanitation gap by 2030
World leaders have committed to “ensure access to water and sanitation for all” by 2030 (SDG 6). What will it take to bridge a gap of 2.4 billion people without adequate sanitation, and 600 million without safe water?World leaders have committed to “ensure access to water and sanitation for all” by 2030 (SDG 6). What will it take to bridge a gap of 2.4 billion people without adequate sanitation, and 600 million without safe water?

Mali: Project to Support Grassroots Initiatives to Fight Hunger and Poverty (PPAR)

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This is a project performance review of the Grassroots Hunger and Poverty Initiative Project (PAIB) financed by the International Development Association (IDA) and implemented between 1998 and 2004 across two regions of Mali (Mopti and Tombouctou). Original financing was anticipated to be $23 million, including a $21.5 million IDA credit and $1.5 million borrower contribution. Actual costs were $ Show MoreThis is a project performance review of the Grassroots Hunger and Poverty Initiative Project (PAIB) financed by the International Development Association (IDA) and implemented between 1998 and 2004 across two regions of Mali (Mopti and Tombouctou). Original financing was anticipated to be $23 million, including a $21.5 million IDA credit and $1.5 million borrower contribution. Actual costs were $23.2 million. The project sought to improve the living conditions of disadvantaged targeted rural communities, responding to their priority needs by strengthening the capacity of communities in identifying and ranking their priority needs and in planning, implementing, and supervising actions to respond to those needs in partnership with nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and local authorities. In parallel, it also sought to strengthen institutional and policy-making capacity at the local and national levels in the fight against hunger and poverty.

A Thirst for Change: An Evaluation of the World Bank Group’s Support for Water Supply and Sanitation with Focus on the Poor

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A Thirst for Change
This evaluation assesses the World Bank Group’s effectiveness in supporting improved access to adequate, reliable, and sustained water and sanitation services in client countries. It also examines how well the Bank Group is equipped to support the countries in moving toward sustained water and sanitation services for all, with a focus on the poor, in keeping with Sustainable Development Goal 6.This evaluation assesses the World Bank Group’s effectiveness in supporting improved access to adequate, reliable, and sustained water and sanitation services in client countries. It also examines how well the Bank Group is equipped to support the countries in moving toward sustained water and sanitation services for all, with a focus on the poor, in keeping with Sustainable Development Goal 6.

Towards Urban Resilience: An Evaluation of the World Bank Group’s Evolving Approach 2007-2017 (Approach Paper)

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Half of humanity – 3.5 billion people – lives in cities today and by 2030, 60% of the world’s population will live in urban areas. Urbanization has the potential to lift people out of poverty and increase prosperity, yet rapid urbanization and unmanaged growth, tend to generate unsustainable land use, which is nearly impossible to change after a city grows. The urban poor are disproportionally Show MoreHalf of humanity – 3.5 billion people – lives in cities today and by 2030, 60% of the world’s population will live in urban areas. Urbanization has the potential to lift people out of poverty and increase prosperity, yet rapid urbanization and unmanaged growth, tend to generate unsustainable land use, which is nearly impossible to change after a city grows. The urban poor are disproportionally affected by chronic stress and shocks. The international community has recognized the importance of achieving sustainable and inclusive urban development by increasing attention to the resilience of cities. The purpose of this evaluation is to provide evaluative insights on the WBG’s role in helping clients foster urban resilience in the face of shocks, threats and chronic stress. The specific objective of this evaluation is to assess how well the WBG is helping clients to build urban resilience – to cope, recover, adapt and transform - in the face of shocks and chronic stress as the World Bank Group seeks to scale up its advice and investment in this domain. The evaluation will place attention on how urban resilience initiatives are linked to the Bank’s broader poverty reduction goals.

Are Countries Doing Enough to Fight Pollution?

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Are Countries Doing Enough to Fight Pollution
Today, many countries are grappling with endemic or near endemic levels of pollution.Today, many countries are grappling with endemic or near endemic levels of pollution.

Video: Time to Prioritize Pollution?

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Time to Prioritize Pollution
A new report released by the World Bank’s Independent Evaluation Group calls on countries to direct more resources towards addressing pollution. The report, Toward a Clean World for All – An Evaluation of the World Bank Group’s Support to Pollution Management, finds that in spite of its significant investment, the World Bank Group needs to more to help its client countries to adequately Show MoreA new report released by the World Bank’s Independent Evaluation Group calls on countries to direct more resources towards addressing pollution. The report, Toward a Clean World for All – An Evaluation of the World Bank Group’s Support to Pollution Management, finds that in spite of its significant investment, the World Bank Group needs to more to help its client countries to adequately prioritize action against pollution. IEG found that support from the World Bank Group and other development partners has not kept pace with increasing pollution levels. A recent report in The Lancet found that pollution is the largest environmental cause of disease and premature death, killing nine million people every year -- three times more deaths than from AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined. Read IEG's report {"preview_thumbnail":"/sites/default/files/Data/styles/video_embed_wysiwyg_preview/public/video_thumbnails/WdDIlXVPqpY.jpg?itok=ebEwi4_N","video_url":"https://youtu.be/UT5JMFTHc6U","settings":{"responsive":0,"width":"854","height":"480","autoplay":0},"settings_summary":["Embedded Video (854x480)."]}