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Topic:Social, Urban, Rural & Resilience
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Improving urban governance: Lessons from Ethiopia

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Improving Urban Governance: Lessons from Ethiopia
This brief captures the lessons from evaluating the World Bank’s Ethiopia Urban Local Government Development Project (ULGDP).This brief captures the lessons from evaluating the World Bank’s Ethiopia Urban Local Government Development Project (ULGDP).

A Seat at the Table: Creating Opportunity for Vulnerable and Often Excluded Populations with Chef José Andrés

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A Seat at the Table: Creating Opportunity for Vulnerable and Often Excluded Populations with Chef José Andrés
How can we provide lasting economic opportunities for the poorest and most vulnerable populations? Join IEG and Chef José Andrés LIVE on Wed., April 10 to learn the what works in the field, and according to evidence. How can we provide lasting economic opportunities for the poorest and most vulnerable populations? Join IEG and Chef José Andrés LIVE on Wed., April 10 to learn the what works in the field, and according to evidence.

Argentina CLR Review FY15-18

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This independent review of the World Bank Group's Completion and Learning Review (CLR) covers the period of the World Bank Group's Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) for Argentina, FY15-FY18. The CPS had three focus areas: (a) unlocking long-term productivity growth and job creation; (b) increasing access to and quality of social infrastructure and services for the poor; and (c) reducing Show MoreThis independent review of the World Bank Group's Completion and Learning Review (CLR) covers the period of the World Bank Group's Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) for Argentina, FY15-FY18. The CPS had three focus areas: (a) unlocking long-term productivity growth and job creation; (b) increasing access to and quality of social infrastructure and services for the poor; and (c) reducing environmental risks and safeguarding natural resources. Gender and governance were cross-cutting themes to be integrated into WBG engagements. While the CPS was finalized before the 2015 election, the CPS framework remained relevant to the new administration's critical priorities, which included economic reforms to boost long-term productivity growth, developing social infrastructure and services in areas with the highest levels of poverty concentration, and meeting the country's targets for Nationally Determined Contributions for climate change.

3ie-IEG Conference on Citizen Engagement and Accountable Government: What Works & What’s Next

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Join us for an interactive dialogue anchored in evaluative evidence about engaging citizens and fostering accountable governance.Join us for an interactive dialogue anchored in evaluative evidence about engaging citizens and fostering accountable governance.

Jamaica: Inner City Basic Services for the Poor Project (PPAR)

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This is a Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) prepared by the Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) of the World Bank Group on the Inner City Basic Services for the Poor Project in Jamaica. This project was selected for a PPAR to provide insights into promoting urban resilience with a focus on informal settlements. The project represents an innovative experience for Jamaica in combining Show MoreThis is a Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) prepared by the Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) of the World Bank Group on the Inner City Basic Services for the Poor Project in Jamaica. This project was selected for a PPAR to provide insights into promoting urban resilience with a focus on informal settlements. The project represents an innovative experience for Jamaica in combining efforts to improve public safety and community capacity while upgrading urban infrastructure. The PPAR findings provide input to a major IEG evaluation on “Building Urban Resilience” (forthcoming, 2019). Ratings for the Inner City Basic Services for the Poor Project are as follows: Outcome was moderately satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was substantial, World Bank performance was moderately satisfactory, and Borrower performance was moderately unsatisfactory. Lessons from the project include: (i) Addressing urban crime and violence through a two-pronged approach of improving basic infrastructure and promoting social inclusion can benefit from the combination of those individual activities that are most effective. (ii) The sharp disconnect between a centralized and well-resourced agency executing infrastructure investments in a decentralized urban situation; and a multiplicity of under-resourced service agencies and local governments in charge of infrastructure maintenance can undermine long-term development outcomes. (iii) In project design, the decision to add activities that are institutionally complex and require focused expertise requires careful consideration to avoid straining resources and effort during project implementation. (iv) To sustain the benefits from community-based and social services for children and youth, long-term engagement is crucial: institutional ownership should be specified, and resources for those activities must be anticipated and secured by the time project support is discontinued.

Uzbekistan: Irrigation and Drainage Interventions to Support the Agriculture Sector (PPAR)

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This is a Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) by the Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) of the World Bank Group on the Ferghana Valley Water Resources Management Project Phase I and the Uzbekistan Rural Enterprise Support Project Phase II in the Republic of Uzbekistan. This PPAR provides insights into how these two projects identified and addressed critical irrigation sector needs to Show MoreThis is a Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) by the Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) of the World Bank Group on the Ferghana Valley Water Resources Management Project Phase I and the Uzbekistan Rural Enterprise Support Project Phase II in the Republic of Uzbekistan. This PPAR provides insights into how these two projects identified and addressed critical irrigation sector needs to improve the country’s irrigation and drainage systems and institutions, both at on-farm and inter-farm levels. The assessment pays special attention to the effectiveness and sustainability of capacity-building support provided to water consumer associations in both projects. Based on such assessment, the PPAR draws common lessons regarding the design and implementation of both projects, which were led by two separate World Bank Global Practices: Water, and Agriculture. The lessons from this PPAR feed into IEG’s forthcoming Evaluation on Strengthening Irrigation Management Models for Sustainable Service Delivery. Ratings for the Ferghana Valley Water Resources Management Project Phase I are as follows: Outcome was moderately satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was substantial, Bank performance was moderately satisfactory, and Borrower performance was moderately satisfactory. Lessons from this project include: (1) Establishing adequate institutional arrangements is critical for sustainable use of improved agricultural technologies and practices such as land leveling and deep ripping. (ii) Sound selection criteria for identifying beneficiaries and areas are crucial for the farmers’ uptake and use of water-saving technologies. Ratings for the Rural Enterprise Support Project Phase II are as follows: Outcome was moderately satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was moderate, Bank performance was moderately satisfactory, and Borrower performance was moderately satisfactory. Lessons include: (1) Coordinated and mutually reinforcing capacity building of financial institutions and farmers is crucial for establishing viable on-farm investments. (ii) Clear concept, measurement, and disclosure arrangements at project appraisal for sensitive data can ensure the availability of results at project completion.

Haiti: Port-Au-Prince Neighborhood Housing Reconstruction (PPAR)

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Haiti is one of the poorest countries worldwide, and it has suffered from a long history of natural disasters, compounded with high poverty, weak institutions, and political instability. A major earthquake struck Haiti in January 2010, centered near the capital Port au Prince. About 220,000 people were killed and 300,000 wounded. Damage to buildings and infrastructure was estimated at US$ 7.8 Show MoreHaiti is one of the poorest countries worldwide, and it has suffered from a long history of natural disasters, compounded with high poverty, weak institutions, and political instability. A major earthquake struck Haiti in January 2010, centered near the capital Port au Prince. About 220,000 people were killed and 300,000 wounded. Damage to buildings and infrastructure was estimated at US$ 7.8 billion, exceeding 100% of the country’s GDP. Over a million people were displaced and settled in internally displaced persons (IDP) camps. Already weak government capacity was further overwhelmed with the deaths of 16,000 staff members. The original project objective was to help residents of selected Port-au-Prince Neighborhoods severely affected by the earthquake return to their communities by supporting them to repair and/or reconstruct their houses and improving basic community service infrastructure. Ratings for the Port Au Prince Neighborhood Housing Project are as follows: Outcome was moderately satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was substantial, Bank performance was moderately satisfactory, and Borrower performance was moderately satisfactory. The assessment offers the following lessons: (i) In the case of catastrophic disasters or in fragile settings, the need to address humanitarian needs and disaster recovery may preclude significant impact on disaster vulnerability reduction. (ii) International NGOs can be effective project implementers in an emergency context where government capacity has been weakened. (iii) Investments in infrastructure can have a larger impact on neighborhood recovery than those from direct housing reconstruction. (iv) Disaster preparedness is critical and requires upfront investment in disaster risk management capacity and in relevant data and analytics, including geospatial data. (v) Projects seeking to support durable responses to crises in FCV countries may need a combination of transitional measures and durable measures targeting vulnerable households. (vi) Pilot efforts may have limited impact if they are not based on a replicable model.

Romania: Hazard Risk Mitigation and Emergency Preparedness Project (PPAR)

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Romania’s Hazard Risk Mitigation and Emergency Preparedness (HRMEP) project, which was implemented between 2004 and 2012, was one of the World Bank’s first efforts to provide ex ante assistance to reduce or mitigate a country’s vulnerabilities to natural disasters related to floods, landslides, and earthquakes. The government sought the support of the World Bank to reduce vulnerability to these Show MoreRomania’s Hazard Risk Mitigation and Emergency Preparedness (HRMEP) project, which was implemented between 2004 and 2012, was one of the World Bank’s first efforts to provide ex ante assistance to reduce or mitigate a country’s vulnerabilities to natural disasters related to floods, landslides, and earthquakes. The government sought the support of the World Bank to reduce vulnerability to these and other natural disasters in a proactive manner, leading to the approval of the HRMEP. The project development objective (PDO) was to assist the government in reducing the environmental, social, and economic vulnerability to natural disasters and catastrophic mining accident spills of pollutants. The PDO also included how the objective would be achieved: (i) the strengthening of emergency management and risk financing capacity; (ii) earthquake risk reduction; (iii) flood and landslide risk reduction; and, (iv) risk reduction of mining accidents in the Tisza Basin in northwest Romania. Ratings for the Hazard Risk Emergency Preparedness Project are as follows: Outcome was moderately unsatisfactory, Risk to development outcome was significant, Bank performance was moderately unsatisfactory, and Borrower performance was moderately unsatisfactory. Key lessons from the experience of the project include the following: (i) Depending on multiple, functionally independent implementing agencies for multisector projects can increase complexity without providing commensurate benefits. (ii) Multisectoral, multihazard efforts to reduce vulnerability to disasters may not offer synergies or economies of scope in the absence of clear logical links between activities and incentives for coordination by the institutions responsible for them. (iii) In a project designed to mitigate the risk of natural disasters, it is essential that sites critical for vulnerability reduction are both properly identified and systematically supported throughout the life of a project. (iv) When supporting structural retrofits, financing only the retrofitting and not the cost of returning buildings to functionality is likely to lead to problems with implementation.

Armenia: Achievements and Challenges in Improving Health Care Utilization – A Multiproject Evaluation of the World Bank Support to the Health System Modernization (2004-2016) (PPAR)

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This is the multiproject Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) for the Adaptable Program Loan (APL) Health System Modernization series (comprising a first phase P073974, a second phase P104467, and an additional financing P121728). It evaluates the extent to which the APL series achieved its intended outcomes and offers an opportunity to draw lessons from the long-term engagement of the Show MoreThis is the multiproject Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) for the Adaptable Program Loan (APL) Health System Modernization series (comprising a first phase P073974, a second phase P104467, and an additional financing P121728). It evaluates the extent to which the APL series achieved its intended outcomes and offers an opportunity to draw lessons from the long-term engagement of the World Bank in reform of the Armenia health sector aiming to inform and guide future investments in the health sector. The APL series was selected for an indepth field-based assessment due to its potential for learning from long-term engagement of the World Bank in health sector reforms; its clustering nature that allows coverage of multiple lending operation in the same country; and the relatively low coverage of previous IEG project evaluations in the country. Ratings for the Health System Modernization Project I are as follows: Outcome was satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was negligible to low, Bank performance was satisfactory, and Borrower performance was satisfactory. Project II ratings are as follows: Outcome was satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was moderate, Bank performance was satisfactory, and Borrower performance was satisfactory. Lessons from both projects include: (i) An approach that exploits synergies and lessons from other World Bank engagements in the health sector is important for undertaking complex reforms and helping the government stay the course of the reform. (ii) Macro and micro health policies need to be combined in a manner that the unintended consequences of policy changes are not overlooked. (iii) A shortened period between the approval dates of successive phases of an APL can limit the opportunity to incorporate lessons from previous phases into the design of new ones. (iv) In country contexts with strong social and cultural factors affecting uptake of health care services, supply-side and systemwide policy reforms need to be combined with demand-side interventions addressing the health-seeking behavior of patients. (v) While investments in infrastructure are not enough for health system modernization, they can help ensure acceptance of the proposed organizational changes involving strong stakeholders in the hospital sector.

An Evaluation of the World Bank Group’s Support to Rwanda (2009–17)

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This evaluation assesses the development effectiveness of the World Bank Group's country program in Rwanda over the period FY09-17. This evaluation assesses the development effectiveness of the World Bank Group's country program in Rwanda over the period FY09-17.