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Topic:Public-Private Partnerships
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Liberia CLR Review FY13-17

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Liberia is a low-income country with a GNI per capita (Atlas method) of 380 US dollars in 2017. After a period of conflict and instability, Liberia's Gross Domestic Product (GDP) grew at an average annual rate of 6.2 percent during 2003-2013. The ebola virus disease (EVD) crisis of 2014-2016 and a drop in global commodity prices resulted in slower average annual GDP growth of 2.1 percent with per Show MoreLiberia is a low-income country with a GNI per capita (Atlas method) of 380 US dollars in 2017. After a period of conflict and instability, Liberia's Gross Domestic Product (GDP) grew at an average annual rate of 6.2 percent during 2003-2013. The ebola virus disease (EVD) crisis of 2014-2016 and a drop in global commodity prices resulted in slower average annual GDP growth of 2.1 percent with per capita annual GDP growth at -0.4 percent during 2013-2017. As a post conflict country aiming to achieve sustained broad-based growth, Liberia faces several development challenges: large infrastructure gaps, poor education and health indicators, a large youth cohort, lack of economic diversification, and weak public institutions. The World Bank Group's country partnership strategy had three pillars: (i) economic transformation; (ii) human development; and (iii) governance and public sector institutions. In addition, the CPS had two cross-cutting themes of capacity development and gender equality. The CPS focus areas and objectives were well aligned with the government's agenda for transformation with a strong focus on infrastructure. The CLR provided a succinct assessment of the achievement of program objectives. It identified the increases in IDA lending attributable to the EVD outbreak. The CLR review agrees with the CLR lessons: (i) ensure government's strong commitment to the CPF program through close alignment with the country's development plans; (ii) adapt and apply a sound post-conflict and fragile country lens in the design of CPF programs for post conflict countries; (iii) keep an eye on medium-term goals even in the face of a crisis such as EVD; (iv) being selective about cross-cutting themes and including outcomes associated with these themes helps maintain the Government's and Country Team's focus on them throughout implementation. IEG provides the following additional lessons: (i) flexibility of the CPS program enabled the WBG to respond to the EVD crisis in a timely manner; and (ii) trust fund activities need to have a well-articulated strategic focus and explicit selectivity filters to ensure that they contribute to the achievement of CPS objectives.

Mauritania CLR Review FY14-16

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This completion and learning review (CLR) covers the period FY 14-16. The country partnership strategy (CPS) consisted of two pillars (or focus areas): (1) Growth and diversification; and (2) economic governance and service delivery. The CPS work program was aligned with pillars I-IV of the third poverty reduction strategy paper (PRSP3): (i) accelerating economic growth; (ii) anchoring growth in Show MoreThis completion and learning review (CLR) covers the period FY 14-16. The country partnership strategy (CPS) consisted of two pillars (or focus areas): (1) Growth and diversification; and (2) economic governance and service delivery. The CPS work program was aligned with pillars I-IV of the third poverty reduction strategy paper (PRSP3): (i) accelerating economic growth; (ii) anchoring growth in the economic sphere directly benefiting the poor; (iii) developing human resources and facilitating access to basic infrastructure; and (iv) promoting real institutional development supported by good governance. Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) concurs with some of lessons provided in the CLR summarized as follows: (i) for a CPS program to yield results, the time to implement the program must be long; (ii) CPS programs need to take a wider approach to sectors, as in the in case of the Banda Gas and associated transmission project; and (iii) the Bank needs to invest in capacity building, both in individual operations and in long-term reform and modernization.

Gambia CLR Review FY13-16

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This review of the World Bank Group's (WBG) Completion and Learning Review (CLR) covers the Second Joint Partnership Strategy (JPS-2), FY13-FY16, for the Gambia. The JPS-2 was a joint strategy of the WBG and the African Development Bank (AfDB).The Gambia is a small, fragile and landlocked country with a GNI per capita income of USD 430 in 2016.The JPS-2 had eight objectives organized around two Show MoreThis review of the World Bank Group's (WBG) Completion and Learning Review (CLR) covers the Second Joint Partnership Strategy (JPS-2), FY13-FY16, for the Gambia. The JPS-2 was a joint strategy of the WBG and the African Development Bank (AfDB).The Gambia is a small, fragile and landlocked country with a GNI per capita income of USD 430 in 2016.The JPS-2 had eight objectives organized around two pillars or focus areas: (i) enhancing productive capacity and competitiveness; (ii) strengthening the institutional capacity for economic governance and public service delivery. The JPS-2 was aligned with the government's medium term development plan as articulated in its Program for Accelerated Growth and Employment (PAGE) 2012-2016 and the government's long-term plan contained in Vision 2020.The JPS-2 focus areas and objectives were aligned with government's Medium Term Development Plan (PAGE), and its long-term strategy, Vision 2020. The joint strategy and clear division of labor with AfDB provided the foundation for WBG's selectivity. The WBG's program was generally selective in terms of focus areas, objectives and interventions. IEG concurs with some of the key lessons which are summarized as follows: (i) strong donor collaboration is critical but could also have high transactions costs; (ii) country capacity is an important consideration in data collection and quality, and in developing a results framework; and (iii) formal mid-course corrections through the PLR process is even more important in a difficult country circumstances. IEG adds the following lessons: i) Small and fragile countries could benefit from participation in regional integration operations by leveraging limited IDA financing and maximizing development impact. In the case of the Gambia, its participation in regional operations brought benefits to the country in terms of improved technology adoption in agriculture and increased connectivity. ii) To the extent possible, it is important that WBG interventions are aligned to the CPS objectives and their contributions reflected in the results framework. In the case of the Gambia, there were IFC interventions in several areas that were not reflected in the results framework.

Role in Global Issues: An Independent Evaluation of the World Bank Group Convening Power (Approach Paper)

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Recent World Bank Group (WBG) strategy documents, including the Forward Look, reiterated the importance of the WBG’s leadership role in dealing with global challenges and positioned the organization’s ability to work at the nexus of local and global issues such as climate change, gender, and pandemics as core part of its value proposition (World Bank 2013 and 2016). When the WBG shareholders Show MoreRecent World Bank Group (WBG) strategy documents, including the Forward Look, reiterated the importance of the WBG’s leadership role in dealing with global challenges and positioned the organization’s ability to work at the nexus of local and global issues such as climate change, gender, and pandemics as core part of its value proposition (World Bank 2013 and 2016). When the WBG shareholders committed to scale up WBG resources through the recent IBRD and IFC capital increase and the IDA18 replenishment in 2016, a core premise was to more strategically perform its global role, in better collaboration with public and private partners. This evaluation is about the WBG’s global role. It will assess how and when the WBG exercises convening power to spark collective action on global issues. Given the scale and interconnectedness of global challenges; increased complexity of the development ecosystem; and concerns over “mission creep”, the WBG’s role as a catalyst for collective action on behalf of the international community could become even more important. When and how should it lead, when should it support, and when should it withdraw?

IFC's Experience with Inclusive Business - An IEG Meso Evaluation

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This evaluation is a corporate-level assessment of the role and effectiveness of IFC in its support to its clients’ inclusive business models. It also identifies implications and options for IFC’s future support to inclusive business. The evaluation uses a two-pronged approach based on: (i) a review of IFC’s entire portfolio (comparing inclusive business projects with the rest of IFC’s portfolio Show MoreThis evaluation is a corporate-level assessment of the role and effectiveness of IFC in its support to its clients’ inclusive business models. It also identifies implications and options for IFC’s future support to inclusive business. The evaluation uses a two-pronged approach based on: (i) a review of IFC’s entire portfolio (comparing inclusive business projects with the rest of IFC’s portfolio), integrating IEG’s relevant evaluative evidence across different sectors and themes; and (ii) a focus on the agribusiness sector.

Creating Markets: Are PPPs the Answer?

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Creating Markets PPPs
World Bank Group experience suggests several fundamentals need to be in place for PPPs to contribute to infrastructure market creation.World Bank Group experience suggests several fundamentals need to be in place for PPPs to contribute to infrastructure market creation.

Creating Markets for Sustainable Growth and Development: An Evaluation of World Bank Group Support to Client Countries FY 07-17 (Approach Paper)

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The international development community is increasingly turning to the private sector in its pursuit of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Involving the private sector as a financier, operator or service provider in SDG relevant areas requires creating markets, i.e., putting in place an enabling business environment, overcoming a range of markets constraints, and/or enhancing competition Show MoreThe international development community is increasingly turning to the private sector in its pursuit of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Involving the private sector as a financier, operator or service provider in SDG relevant areas requires creating markets, i.e., putting in place an enabling business environment, overcoming a range of markets constraints, and/or enhancing competition through regulatory reform, pioneering investments or innovation. All these creating markets components imply certain roles for the private sector, the government and regulatory authorities. Since the 2002 World Bank Group (WBG) Private Sector Development Strategy creating markets has been a well-established part of the WBG-wide development agenda. The objective of this evaluation is to distill lessons from the Bank Group’s experience in creating markets to leverage the private sector for sustainable development and growth. Such lessons are intended to inform future program development and the upcoming implementation of the Creating market / Cascade approach. In this regard, the evaluation will obtain evidence-based findings, develop broadly-applicable lessons across the Bank Group, and propose appropriate recommendations.

Mobile Metropolises – The World Bank Group’s Role in Supporting Urban Transport

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Mobile Metropolises
Join our panel of experts as they discuss how the World Bank Group can strengthen its support and make use of its influence to help establish well-managed urban transport systems in its client countries.Join our panel of experts as they discuss how the World Bank Group can strengthen its support and make use of its influence to help establish well-managed urban transport systems in its client countries.

Rwanda Country Program Evaluation FY09-17 (Approach Paper)

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The primary goal of this evaluation is to assess the Bank Group’s development effectiveness in Rwanda during the period FY09-17 and to inform the design and implementation of future WBG activities in Rwanda. The Country Program Evaluation (CPE) will place strong emphasis on assessing World Bank Group (WBG) strategic positioning and program delivery to help Rwanda achieve its development goals, Show MoreThe primary goal of this evaluation is to assess the Bank Group’s development effectiveness in Rwanda during the period FY09-17 and to inform the design and implementation of future WBG activities in Rwanda. The Country Program Evaluation (CPE) will place strong emphasis on assessing World Bank Group (WBG) strategic positioning and program delivery to help Rwanda achieve its development goals, notably to become a lower middle income country by 2020. The selection of Rwanda for this CPE – one of two undertaken by IEG in FY18 – is motivated by the country’s important development achievements during the period of analysis as well as by the major challenges the country faces in order to sustain those gains going forward. The CPE seeks to provide inputs for the next Country Partnership Framework (CPF).

Two to Tango: An Evaluation of World Bank Group Support for Fostering Regional Integration (Approach Paper)

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Three overlapping forces shape economic and political systems in the contemporary world order: globalization, regionalism and nationalism. The first wave of regionalism in the 1960-1980 was primarily driven by the trade and tariff agenda, followed by the second wave in the 1980-2000 when regionalism was seen as a useful supplement to multilateralism. Today, in the context of emerging market and Show MoreThree overlapping forces shape economic and political systems in the contemporary world order: globalization, regionalism and nationalism. The first wave of regionalism in the 1960-1980 was primarily driven by the trade and tariff agenda, followed by the second wave in the 1980-2000 when regionalism was seen as a useful supplement to multilateralism. Today, in the context of emerging market and developing economies, the new dimensions of regionalism include interactions beyond trade, and can potentially encompasses hard infrastructure, institutional alignments, labor and capital flows. This evaluation focuses on regional integration (RI), which the World Bank Group (WBG) defines as economic interactions across at least two sovereign jurisdictions that are geographically close and resulting in integration of factors and goods, and coordination of policy. According to the 2013 World Bank Group Strategy, transformational engagements are about regional integration, involving both game-changing investments and actions to address policy constraints that require a coordinated response by several countries. Most transformational engagements entail partnerships in which the WBG may play a leading or supporting role. This evaluation is classified under the IEG Strategic Engagement Area (SEA), Inclusive and Sustainable Economic Growth.