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Comoros CLR Review FY14-19

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This review of the Comoros Completion and Learning Review (CLR) of the World Bank Group (WBG) Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) covers the CPS period, FY14-FY19, and the Performance and Learning Review (PLR) of December 2018. This is the first CPS for Comoros following a series of Interim Strategy Notes (ISNs), the latest of which was prepared in 2010. The WBG programs under the ISNs were Show MoreThis review of the Comoros Completion and Learning Review (CLR) of the World Bank Group (WBG) Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) covers the CPS period, FY14-FY19, and the Performance and Learning Review (PLR) of December 2018. This is the first CPS for Comoros following a series of Interim Strategy Notes (ISNs), the latest of which was prepared in 2010. The WBG programs under the ISNs were limited in scope reflecting the high level of political instability, serious governance issues and related low IDA allocations. The CLR highlighted several lessons about a need to ensure a streamlined project design and flexibility in implementation; value of increased WBG presence on the ground; importance of donor coordination; and a need for greater realism and selectivity in the program. IEG particularly agrees that there is need for greater realism and selectivity in the program, throughout the program, beyond the governance area on which the lesson in the CLR focuses. Being excessively ambitious with respect to institutional targets in a fragile environment increases the risk of program underperformance. IEG adds the following lesson: The decision on a large program expansion at the PLR stage requires a detailed discussion and careful justification in the PLR document because it poses a longer-term implementation risk.

Croatia: Revenue Administration Modernization Project (PPAR)

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The development objective of the Croatia Revenue Administration Modernization Project was to achieve further improvements in tax efficiency, taxpayer services, and tax compliance through capacity building and systems improvement in the Croatia Tax Administration (CTA). For purposes of this review, three sub-objectives are assessed: (i) improvements in efficiency; (ii) improvements in taxpayer Show MoreThe development objective of the Croatia Revenue Administration Modernization Project was to achieve further improvements in tax efficiency, taxpayer services, and tax compliance through capacity building and systems improvement in the Croatia Tax Administration (CTA). For purposes of this review, three sub-objectives are assessed: (i) improvements in efficiency; (ii) improvements in taxpayer services; and (iii) improvements in tax compliance. Ratings for the Revenue Administration Modernization Project are as follows: Outcome was moderately unsatisfactory, Risk to development outcome was negligible, Bank performance was moderately unsatisfactory, and Borrower performance was moderately unsatisfactory. This assessment offers the following lessons: (i) Poor quality at entry and lack of readiness for implementation contributed to significant implementation delays and limited results. (ii) Given that the main driver of the tax administration reforms was Croatia’s bid for membership of the EU, the project could have better secured the government’s commitment to reforms up front. (iii) In projects aiming to improve tax revenue administration, the right balance must be struck between institutional reform and hardware needs (buildings and information and communications technologies). (iv) High TTL turnover could be mitigated by ensuring adequate capacity in the field with the presence of competent local staff.

An Evaluation of the World Bank Group’s Support to Municipal Solid Waste Management, 2010–20 (Approach Paper)

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Municipal solid waste (MSW) has emerged as one of the most pressing challenges for urban areas across the world. This evaluation is the Independent Evaluation Group’s (IEG) first major study of the Bank Group’s support for MSWM. It is timely given the rapidly increasing scale of MSW in most MICs and LICs and considering the spectacle of massive open garbage dumps in cities as diverse as Manila, Show MoreMunicipal solid waste (MSW) has emerged as one of the most pressing challenges for urban areas across the world. This evaluation is the Independent Evaluation Group’s (IEG) first major study of the Bank Group’s support for MSWM. It is timely given the rapidly increasing scale of MSW in most MICs and LICs and considering the spectacle of massive open garbage dumps in cities as diverse as Manila, Lagos, and New Delhi. The evaluation will highlight the linkages of MSWM with other sectors and themes such as water supply and sanitation, environment, climate change, health, jobs, and social protection. This can point to how the Bank Group can better support the development of synergistic policy frameworks and regulations for MSWM in client countries. This has implications for developing systematic collaboration between various sectors within the Bank Group and among client government ministries and for leveraging opportunities for climate finance.

Croatia: Justice Sector Support Project (PPAR)

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Croatia has one of the highest per capita incomes ($15,870 in 2018) among World Bank borrowers. It has a small population (4.179 million in 2019) and a large tradable goods sector; imports and exports accounted for 48.8 and 51.1 percent, respectively, of the gross domestic product in 2017. In 2013, Croatia joined the European Union (EU) as the 28th member state. Since then, the country has reaped Show MoreCroatia has one of the highest per capita incomes ($15,870 in 2018) among World Bank borrowers. It has a small population (4.179 million in 2019) and a large tradable goods sector; imports and exports accounted for 48.8 and 51.1 percent, respectively, of the gross domestic product in 2017. In 2013, Croatia joined the European Union (EU) as the 28th member state. Since then, the country has reaped significant benefits from EU transfers. The World Bank Group provided substantial support to help Croatia align with EU policies and to strengthen the public sector’s capacity to administer and absorb EU funding. Compared with most peer countries in the EU, Croatia has weaker governance, a less business-friendly environment for investment and entrepreneurship, and relatively weak human capital indicators (World Bank 2018b).The project development objective (PDO) was to improve the efficiency of Croatia’s justice system. The project was restructured in 2013 and 2015, but the PDO remained unchanged. The rationale for the Justice Sector Support Project (JSSP) was that the efficiency of the justice system was hampered by the large existing case backlog in the court system, poor court infrastructure, poor enforcement of judgments, and in 2015, a weak personal bankruptcy framework. An additional factor, although part of the neither PDO nor of Croatia’s pre-accession requirements to the European Commission, was to address concerns expressed by the European Union (EU in their annual country reports. The EU stated that the Croatian justice sector had several deficiencies related to court performance that needed to be addressed once accession had occurred. Ratings for the Justice Sector Support Project are as follows: Outcome was moderately satisfactory, Overall efficacy was substantial, Bank performance was moderately unsatisfactory, and Quality of monitoring and evaluation was modest. This assessment offers the following lessons: (i) At the design stage, a diagnostic assessment of the main contributors to court backlogs and consultations with major stakeholders could have informed project design to address other important constraints to achieving the PDO. (ii) When infrastructure works need to be ready for implementation at project start-up, it is important to verify that this is the case in advance. (iii) Delays in critical reviews during project implementation can compromise midterm corrections. (iv) When elections are in the near future, continuity risks can be attenuated by briefing key opposition politicians on the rationale for a project.

Bangladesh Country Program Evaluation (Approach Paper)

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The Country Program Evaluation (CPE) for Bangladesh aims to assess the development effectiveness of the World Bank Group’s engagement with Bangladesh during the last 10 years (fiscal year [FY]11–20). The CPE will review the extent to which the Bank Group contributed to Bangladesh’s development outcomes. In so doing, it will assess the extent to which Bank Group support was aligned with the Bank Show MoreThe Country Program Evaluation (CPE) for Bangladesh aims to assess the development effectiveness of the World Bank Group’s engagement with Bangladesh during the last 10 years (fiscal year [FY]11–20). The CPE will review the extent to which the Bank Group contributed to Bangladesh’s development outcomes. In so doing, it will assess the extent to which Bank Group support was aligned with the Bank Group’s corporate twin goals—ending extreme poverty and boosting shared prosperity—and with International Development Association (IDA) priorities. It also will assess how that support adapted over the evaluation period to changing circumstances and priorities. It will cover two country engagement cycles as defined in the Country Assistance Strategy (CAS) for FY11–15 and the Country Partnership Framework (CPF) for FY16–21.

IEG Work Program and Budget (FY21) and Indicative Plan (FY22-23)

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IEG will build on the strategic framework it adopted in FY 20, centering its work program around 6 work streams on i) Gender, ii) Fragility, Conflict, and Violence (FCV), iii) Climate Change and Environmental Sustainability, iv) Mobilizing Finance for Development (MFD), v) Human Capital, and vi) Jobs, Growth, and Shared Prosperity, and 2 cross cutting themes on i) Governance and Institutions, and Show MoreIEG will build on the strategic framework it adopted in FY 20, centering its work program around 6 work streams on i) Gender, ii) Fragility, Conflict, and Violence (FCV), iii) Climate Change and Environmental Sustainability, iv) Mobilizing Finance for Development (MFD), v) Human Capital, and vi) Jobs, Growth, and Shared Prosperity, and 2 cross cutting themes on i) Governance and Institutions, and ii) the WBG’s Corporate Effectiveness. IEG will also maintain an increased and balanced focus on country level outcomes. To contribute meaningfully to the WBG response to the COVID-19 crisis, in the near term, IEG will update its pipeline evaluations to contextualize findings and lessons where relevant. IEG will also respond to WBG management requests for just in time notes that synthesize evidence and lessons from past evaluations to inform the crisis response, and IEG will provide on-demand M&E advice to WBG operational teams working on crisis related programs and play an active role in sharing relevant evaluative insights and lessons drawn from past crises. In the short to medium term, IEG will also conduct early stage evaluations of the WBG’s response to the crisis, intended to offer evidence useful to enhancing implementation effectiveness. In the medium to longer term, IEG will undertake ex post evaluations of the impact of the Bank Group’s response and lessons to inform future crisis response.

The Missing Middle: addressing income inequality is the next challenge for the Philippines as it approaches UMIC status

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The Missing Middle: addressing income inequality is the next challenge for the Philippines as it approaches UMIC status
How the World Bank Group can build on previous successful engagements to achieve results that go beyond growth numbers.How the World Bank Group can build on previous successful engagements to achieve results that go beyond growth numbers.

Not just what, but how: a strong delivery system was key to the success of the Philippines’ nationwide social protection program

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Not just what, but how: a strong delivery system was key to the success of the Philippines’ nationwide social protection program
Effective system identifies beneficiaries and delivers cash transfers in a regular and reliable way.Effective system identifies beneficiaries and delivers cash transfers in a regular and reliable way.

Mexico CLR Review FY14-19

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This review of Mexico’s Completion and Learning Review (CLR) of the World Bank Group’s Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) covers the CPS period FY14-FY19 and the Performance and Learning Review (PLR) of January 26, 2017. Mexico is an upper-middle-income country with a gross national income (GNI) per capita (in current US$) of US$9,180 in 2018. During 2014-18, the average annual GDP growth rate Show MoreThis review of Mexico’s Completion and Learning Review (CLR) of the World Bank Group’s Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) covers the CPS period FY14-FY19 and the Performance and Learning Review (PLR) of January 26, 2017. Mexico is an upper-middle-income country with a gross national income (GNI) per capita (in current US$) of US$9,180 in 2018. During 2014-18, the average annual GDP growth rate was 2.2 percent in a show of resilience in the face of a complex external environment. In the first half of 2019, economic growth came to a virtual halt owing to policy uncertainty, tight monetary conditions and budget under-execution as well as slowing global manufacturing activity. Over the longer term, Mexico’s economic growth has been below the level needed to converge toward advanced country economies. The country’s per capita GDP, which is closely related to productivity, stands at 34 percent of U.S. per capita GDP compared with 49 percent in 1980.2 Poverty rates (share of individuals living on less than the 2011 PPP US$1.90 per day poverty line) fell from 3.8 percent of the population in 2016 to 2.2 percent in 2016. There was a small decline in the Gini index from 48.7 percent in 2014 to 48.3 in 2016. IEG’s Country Program Evaluation for Mexico (2018) indicates that Mexico’s multidimensional poverty index for the extremely poor fell from 11.3 percent in 2010 to 7.6 percent in 2016, helping reduce the overall index from 46.1 percent to 43.6 percent. At the same time, income growth of the bottom 40 percent was below the population mean.

Evaluation of the World Bank’s Support to Improving Child Undernutrition and Its Determinants (Approach Paper)

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Global reports on indicators of child undernutrition show mixed progress in reducing the stunting (impaired growth and development) of children under five, with Africa and South Asia most severely affected. There are many determinants of child undernutrition, which makes the challenge of improving outcomes multidimensional, requiring interventions in areas of health; agriculture; water, Show MoreGlobal reports on indicators of child undernutrition show mixed progress in reducing the stunting (impaired growth and development) of children under five, with Africa and South Asia most severely affected. There are many determinants of child undernutrition, which makes the challenge of improving outcomes multidimensional, requiring interventions in areas of health; agriculture; water, sanitation, and hygiene; social protection; education; and governance, depending on the country context. The objectives of this evaluation are to assess the contribution of the World Bank to improving outcomes related to child undernutrition and its determinants in countries affected by undernutrition, and to provide lessons and recommendations to inform the design of the World Bank’s future multidimensional nutrition support.