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Connecting People, Places, and Ideas

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Connecting People, Places, and Ideas
One Week. Tens of thousands of people. 38 countries. All join together to share knowledge about Monitoring and Evaluation systems and capacity.One Week. Tens of thousands of people. 38 countries. All join together to share knowledge about Monitoring and Evaluation systems and capacity.

Mongolia: Governance Assistance Project (PPAR)

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This Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) evaluates the Governance Assistance Project (GAP) of the International Development Association (IDA) in Mongolia (P170780). The project was approved in March 2006 in the amount of special drawing rights 9.7 million (equivalent to US$14 million), funded by an IDA grant. Following two extensions, it closed on December 31, 2014. This assessment aims Show MoreThis Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) evaluates the Governance Assistance Project (GAP) of the International Development Association (IDA) in Mongolia (P170780). The project was approved in March 2006 in the amount of special drawing rights 9.7 million (equivalent to US$14 million), funded by an IDA grant. Following two extensions, it closed on December 31, 2014. This assessment aims to review whether and how the operation achieved its intended objectives. The PPAR also examines the long-term sustainability of GAP support, such as the extent to which the GAP’s main achievements have been sustained more than four years since the project’s closure. This report provides additional evidence and analysis of relevant data for a more complete picture of the project outcomes and the factors that influenced them. By reviewing developments from 2014 to 2019 (after the project closed), it offers an opportunity for a longer-term perspective on the factors affecting outcomes. Ratings for this project are as follows: Outcome as satisfactory, risk to development outcome was modest, bank performance was moderately satisfactory, and borrower performance was moderately satisfactory. This PPAR offers the following lessons: (i) In a low-capacity environment, introduction of basic technical solutions and application of incremental step-by-step reforms can be an effective strategy. (ii) Implementation risks related to project complexity and multiple government implementing agencies can be successfully managed if there is strong leadership from the core government agency (such as the Ministry of Finance) and an experienced and empowered Project Coordination Unit. (iii) Technical assistance projects with multisectoral coverage require significant supervision support. Lack of budget can limit the ability of the World Bank to provide the specialized technical inputs needed to help the client make better design and implementation choices.

What is blended finance, and how can it help deliver successful high-impact, high-risk projects?

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What is blended finance, and how can it help deliver successful high-impact, high-risk projects?
An introduction to an effective tool to crowd in private sector financing where it is most needed.An introduction to an effective tool to crowd in private sector financing where it is most needed.

Morocco: First and Second Transparency and Accountability Development Policy Loan (PPAR)

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This Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) assesses two International Bank for Reconstruction and Development loans (First and Second Transparency and Accountability Development Policy Loans, known as Hakama 1 and 2) made to Morocco during 2013–16 and totaling approximately $407 million. The first operation was approved in October 2013 and the second in October 2015. The European Union and Show MoreThis Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) assesses two International Bank for Reconstruction and Development loans (First and Second Transparency and Accountability Development Policy Loans, known as Hakama 1 and 2) made to Morocco during 2013–16 and totaling approximately $407 million. The first operation was approved in October 2013 and the second in October 2015. The European Union and the African Development Bank provided parallel financing in the form of budget support; the European Union and World Bank also provided technical assistance. The development objectives of the loans were to strengthen mechanisms promoting transparency and accountability in the management of public resources, and to support legal reforms fostering open governance in Morocco in line with the new Constitution. Ratings are as follows: Outcome was moderately satisfactory, Risk to development was substantial, Bank performance was moderately satisfactory, and Borrower performance was satisfactory. Lesson from these projects include: (i) Improved knowledge management and better use of knowledge enhance operational quality. (ii) Monitoring and evaluation require attention both at the design stage and during implementation. (iii) Greater transparency and better information management are needed to sustain dialogue as World Bank teams and counterparts change. (iv) It would be helpful to assess a cluster of mutually reinforcing World Bank operations jointly.

Ensuring Equality and Inclusion in Education: What Works to Meet SDG 4.5?

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Ensuring Equality and Inclusion in Education: What Works to Meet SDG 4.5?
A summary of findings from multiple evaluations of education interventions that promote gender equality and equity for vulnerable groups. A summary of findings from multiple evaluations of education interventions that promote gender equality and equity for vulnerable groups.

New Collaboration to Address Global Gaps in Monitoring and Evaluation Capacity

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New Collaboration to Address Global Gaps in Monitoring and Evaluation Capacity
For information, contact William Stebbins email: wstebbins@worldbank.org | tel: +1 (202) 458-7883   New York City, NY, January 13, 2020 – The World Bank’s Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) and the Independent Evaluation Office of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) today marking the first step towards establishing a global partnership Show MoreFor information, contact William Stebbins email: wstebbins@worldbank.org | tel: +1 (202) 458-7883   New York City, NY, January 13, 2020 – The World Bank’s Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) and the Independent Evaluation Office of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) today marking the first step towards establishing a global partnership to support evaluation capacity development. The IEG-UNDP collaboration comes at a time when the global demand for support to strengthen monitoring and evaluation (M&E) systems and capacities is high. Countries need effective M&E systems and capacities in order to track the progress on their national development strategies. The support to meet this demand, while growing, is often limited by scale and a lack of coordination. As part of this new collaboration, IEG and UNDP aim to pool resources, share knowledge and expertise, and leverage the comparative advantages of each institution for scaling up current initiatives and coordinating global efforts on building M&E systems and capacity. “This collaboration comes at a pivotal moment, as the ten-year countdown toward the Sustainable Development Goals begins,” said Indran Naidoo, UNDP Director of the Independent Evaluation Office. “Effective systems of monitoring and evaluation are critical for reaching the goals, as they allow countries to base policies on what has proven to work, and to monitor their progress to ensure no one is left behind.” “No single institution has the resources to address the current global gaps in monitoring and evaluation capacity,” said Alison Evans, World Bank Vice President and IEG Director-General. “Addressing the scale of the need will require coordinated efforts by broad coalitions, and this collaboration is a step in that direction, providing a foundation that can be built on.”  Along with coordinating activities and sharing resources, the two organizations will seek to expand their collaboration globally to include the range of countries and institutions involved in developing the capacity for monitoring and evaluation.   Read more about the current challenges in global M&E capacity and the need for joint action in a recent #WhatWorks blog post by IEG Director-General Alison Evans.   

Results and Performance of the World Bank Group 2020 (Concept Note)

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With the Results and Performance of the World Bank Group 2020 (RAP 2020), the Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) is rethinking its approach to the annual review of World Bank Group development effectiveness. Similar to past years, the report will synthesize ratings and other evidence from IEG evaluations and validations to give an aggregated picture of the results and performance of the World Show MoreWith the Results and Performance of the World Bank Group 2020 (RAP 2020), the Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) is rethinking its approach to the annual review of World Bank Group development effectiveness. Similar to past years, the report will synthesize ratings and other evidence from IEG evaluations and validations to give an aggregated picture of the results and performance of the World Bank, the International Finance Corporation (IFC), and the Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA). The scope of the report and the data sources used will be broader than in past years to deepen some of the analysis on drivers of performance and allow for the rethinking of statistical methods. The report will review the results, outcomes, and performance of the Bank Group at the level of projects, country programs, and corporate priorities and will also reflect on the systems used to measure outcomes. The RAP will not have a special theme. Its title will stay the same, except for the year, which will be updated to denote the calendar year in which the report is finalized. Hence, although the previous RAP was titled RAP 2018, the next one will be titled RAP 2020.

A Pivotal Year for Monitoring and Evaluation

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A Pivotal Year for Monitoring and Evaluation
Building and improving monitoring and evaluation capacity worldwide is key to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals within ten years. Building and improving monitoring and evaluation capacity worldwide is key to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals within ten years.

The World Bank Group Partnership with the Philippines, 2009–18

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The World Bank Group Partnership with the Philippines, 2009–18 Country Program Evaluation
This Country Program Evaluation (CPE) assesses the development effectiveness of the World Bank Group program in the Philippines between 2009 and 2018.This Country Program Evaluation (CPE) assesses the development effectiveness of the World Bank Group program in the Philippines between 2009 and 2018.

Ukraine: First and Second Programmatic Financial Sector Development Policy Loan (PPAR)

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This Project Performance Assessment Report evaluates a programmatic series of two development policy loans (DPLs) to Ukraine of $500 million each that were provided as part of an urgent international effort to assist the country when Ukraine’s financial sector teetered on the edge of collapse in 2014. A perfect storm had affected the financial system when the geopolitical situation had descended Show MoreThis Project Performance Assessment Report evaluates a programmatic series of two development policy loans (DPLs) to Ukraine of $500 million each that were provided as part of an urgent international effort to assist the country when Ukraine’s financial sector teetered on the edge of collapse in 2014. A perfect storm had affected the financial system when the geopolitical situation had descended into deep crisis arising from the Euromaidan political upheaval, the Russian Federation’s annexation of Crimea, and the armed separatist movement in the eastern part of the country that initiated open, armed conflict that at times resembled a full-scale war. The exchange rate virtually halved between the end of 2013 (Hrv 8.13 to 1 U.S. dollar) and the end of 2014 (Hrv 15.8 to 1 U.S. dollar), inflation accelerated to 24 percent, the public sector fiscal deficit exceeded 10 percent of gross domestic product (GDP), and public debt—including guarantees—spiked to 70 percent of GDP. Ratings for the First and Second Programmatic Financial Sector Development Policy Loan are as follows: Outcome was satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was high, Bank performance was satisfactory, and Borrower performance was moderately satisfactory. Lessons from the projects include: (i) Close coordination among donors is critical for DPLs to maximize the effectiveness of a jointly designed reform program. (ii) The design of DPLs needs to focus on all relevant issues, potential weaknesses, and gaps in reform measures. (iii) The presence of task teams in the field can be a critical factor in promoting financial sector reform. (iv) Weak public understanding of financial sector reforms indicates a need to expand outreach efforts to enhance political sustainability. (v) Sustainable reform is difficult to achieve in countries that have corrupt power structures and court systems. Under such circumstances, it is an open question whether World Bank assistance risks providing additional resources for rent seeking rather than support for reforms.