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Albania Country Program Evaluation

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The primary goal of the evaluation is to assess the Bank Group’s development effectiveness in Albania during the period FY11-19 and to inform the design and implementation of its future activities in Albania. The Country Program Evaluation (CPE) will place strong emphasis on assessing World Bank Group strategic positioning and program delivery to help Albania achieve its development goals, Show MoreThe primary goal of the evaluation is to assess the Bank Group’s development effectiveness in Albania during the period FY11-19 and to inform the design and implementation of its future activities in Albania. The Country Program Evaluation (CPE) will place strong emphasis on assessing World Bank Group strategic positioning and program delivery to help Albania achieve its development goals, notably that of European Union (EU) accession. The selection of Albania is motivated by the important challenges the country has faced since the 2008 financial crisis in sustaining the major development gains achieved following the opening of the economy in the early 1990s. The report seeks to provide inputs for the next Country Partnership Framework (CPF), scheduled for Board discussion in FY21. While the CPE is primarily aimed at informing future WBG support to Albania, the evaluation findings are expected to provide lessons for WBG programs in countries that share similar characteristics and aspirations—for example, other small-size, middleincome countries seeking to achieve high rates of growth and poverty reduction, facing the challenge of employment creation, or aspiring to join the EU.

2018 in review: Highlights from IEG’s blogs and evaluations

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2018 in Review:
A look back at our best blogs from 2018, and a review the evaluations, conversations, and issues we covered over the course of the year.A look back at our best blogs from 2018, and a review the evaluations, conversations, and issues we covered over the course of the year.

Engaging Citizens for Better Development Results

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Engaging Citizens for Better Development Results
IEG held a panel discussion about what can be done to further improve the quality and depth of World Bank Group citizen engagement efforts, as well as the factors determining their successful integration into lending instruments, country strategy preparation, and policy formulation. IEG held a panel discussion about what can be done to further improve the quality and depth of World Bank Group citizen engagement efforts, as well as the factors determining their successful integration into lending instruments, country strategy preparation, and policy formulation.

Bhutan: Strengthening Regional Cooperation for Wildlife Protection in Asia: Phase II of the Adaptable Program Loan (PPAR)

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South Asia is home to 13–15 percent of the Earth’s floral and faunal biodiversity, including some of its most iconic and endangered wildlife species, such as tigers, snow leopards, one-horn rhinoceroses, elephants, pangolins, and brown bears, all of which are on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature’s Red List of Threatened Species (2017). Among the South Asian countries, Bhutan Show MoreSouth Asia is home to 13–15 percent of the Earth’s floral and faunal biodiversity, including some of its most iconic and endangered wildlife species, such as tigers, snow leopards, one-horn rhinoceroses, elephants, pangolins, and brown bears, all of which are on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature’s Red List of Threatened Species (2017). Among the South Asian countries, Bhutan has a high density and an extraordinary range of species (more than 5,000 vascular plants, 600 birds, and nearly 200 mammals). This biodiversity is extremely important to the patrimony of Bhutan and to the economy and well-being of its people. At project appraisal in 2011, the South Asian region was facing several threats to its wildlife, including rapid loss of critical natural habitats, increasing poaching of wildlife, and expanding illegal trade in wildlife and wildlife products driven largely by consumer demand in East Asia. The project’s objective was “to assist the Recipient in building and/or enhancing shared capacity, institutions, knowledge, and incentives to tackle illegal wildlife trade and other selected regional conservation threats to habitats in border areas. Ratings for the project are as follows: Outcome was satisfactory, Risk to development was moderate, Bank performance was moderately satisfactory, and Borrower performance was moderately satisfactory. IEG’s review of the project’s experience suggests the following lessons: (i) Robust upstream work that builds strong and sustained commitment by all governments participating in a regional approach to wildlife protection is a necessary condition for success. (ii) Projects involving multicountry collaboration on global public goods are challenging to design and implement, making the provision of adequate preparation time critical for conducting necessary analyses of participating country commitments and capacities. (iii) Projects piloting new approaches to multicountry collaboration on transboundary wildlife management present challenges that require a carefully designed results framework to measure and track progress in achieving project objectives. (iv) Projects designed to build national institutions and capacity for multicountry collaboration on transboundary wildlife management require a long-term investment to ensure successful outcomes.

Four things countries can do to support Universal Health Coverage: Insights from a recent evaluation

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Four things countries can do to support Universal Health Coverage
How governments and institutions like the World Bank can do more to support progress towards Universal Health Coverage.How governments and institutions like the World Bank can do more to support progress towards Universal Health Coverage.

Five ways to think about quality in evaluation

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Five ways to think about quality in evaluation
Five frameworks to build greater understanding of the building blocks of quality, and to enhance quality in evaluation.Five frameworks to build greater understanding of the building blocks of quality, and to enhance quality in evaluation.

Uruguay: Noncommunicable Diseases Prevention Project (PPAR)

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This is a Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) by the Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) of the World Bank Group on the Noncommunicable Diseases (NCD) Prevention Project. The project was selected for a PPAR to capture lessons from one of the first exclusively NCD-focused projects supported by the World Bank. Ratings for the Noncommunicable Disease Prevention Project are as follows: Show MoreThis is a Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) by the Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) of the World Bank Group on the Noncommunicable Diseases (NCD) Prevention Project. The project was selected for a PPAR to capture lessons from one of the first exclusively NCD-focused projects supported by the World Bank. Ratings for the Noncommunicable Disease Prevention Project are as follows: Outcome was moderately satisfactory, Risk to Development Outcome was substantial, Bank performance was moderately satisfactory, and Borrower performance was moderately satisfactory. Four lessons emerged: i) Preventing NCDs requires a multidimensional approach that goes beyond strengthening the role of MSP and health services. ii) Projects implemented during important reform processes must take into consideration the timing of the reform and adjust project expectations and ambitions accordingly. (iii) Projects with a strong focus on capacity building need to be more realistic about what can be achieved within the project lifetime. (iv) Innovative projects like the PPENT should devote more attention to capture learning from implementation.

Mozambique: Southern Africa Regional Gas Project (PPAR)

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When the Southern Africa Regional Gas Project (SARGP) was approved in November 2003, Mozambique had seen strong economic growth since the end of the civil war in 1992 but faced challenges in improving its business environment and attracting foreign investment. Although Mozambique’s gas reserves had been discovered in the 1960s, they remained undeveloped. The World Bank had provided advice and Show MoreWhen the Southern Africa Regional Gas Project (SARGP) was approved in November 2003, Mozambique had seen strong economic growth since the end of the civil war in 1992 but faced challenges in improving its business environment and attracting foreign investment. Although Mozambique’s gas reserves had been discovered in the 1960s, they remained undeveloped. The World Bank had provided advice and technical assistance to help develop the gas fields since 1991. In 2000, the government signed an agreement with the South African petrochemical company, Sasol, under which Sasol would develop the gas reserves in Mozambique and export natural gas to South Africa over a 25-year period. The stated objective of the SARGP was to help: “initiate the development and export of Mozambique’s substantial natural gas resources in an environmentally sustainable manner, thereby contributing towards economic growth and poverty reduction in Mozambique.” The project ratings are as follows: Outcome was satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was negligible to low, Bank performance was satisfactory, and Borrower performance was satisfactory. Lessons from this experience include: (i) The PRG instrument can provide distinct risk mitigation to support a first-of-kind public-private partnership project in an untested policy and regulatory environment. (ii) Even as a late entrant into a project’s financing structure, the Bank Group can leverage its presence to enhance E&S safeguards and community development initiatives. (iii) Some flexibility in concession agreements to review price mechanism clauses in the event of extreme divergence from initial assumptions can help enhance long-term viability of a public-private partnership project. (iv) Coordination of corporate local community development initiatives with local government programs can help enhance their sustainability. (v) Proactive measures by the sponsor company to develop local suppliers are likely to be needed to ensure upstream linkages in extractive industry projects.

Harnessing the potential of carbon markets under the Paris Agreement: Lessons from the Kyoto experience

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Harnessing the potential of carbon markets under the Paris Agreement
What can the World Bank Group experience under the Kyoto Protocol tell us about creating a better operational framework for new carbon markets?What can the World Bank Group experience under the Kyoto Protocol tell us about creating a better operational framework for new carbon markets?

Carbon Markets for Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction in a Warming World

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Carbon Markets for Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction in a Warming World
This evaluation assesses the role and contributions of the World Bank Group in Carbon Finance (CF) in relation to the needs and priorities of its client countries, its potential comparative advantages, and draws lessons to inform the Bank Group's future strategic direction in CF.This evaluation assesses the role and contributions of the World Bank Group in Carbon Finance (CF) in relation to the needs and priorities of its client countries, its potential comparative advantages, and draws lessons to inform the Bank Group's future strategic direction in CF.