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Uruguay: Noncommunicable Diseases Prevention Project (PPAR)

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This is a Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) by the Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) of the World Bank Group on the Noncommunicable Diseases (NCD) Prevention Project. The project was selected for a PPAR to capture lessons from one of the first exclusively NCD-focused projects supported by the World Bank. Ratings for the Noncommunicable Disease Prevention Project are as follows: Show MoreThis is a Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) by the Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) of the World Bank Group on the Noncommunicable Diseases (NCD) Prevention Project. The project was selected for a PPAR to capture lessons from one of the first exclusively NCD-focused projects supported by the World Bank. Ratings for the Noncommunicable Disease Prevention Project are as follows: Outcome was moderately satisfactory, Risk to Development Outcome was substantial, Bank performance was moderately satisfactory, and Borrower performance was moderately satisfactory. Four lessons emerged: i) Preventing NCDs requires a multidimensional approach that goes beyond strengthening the role of MSP and health services. ii) Projects implemented during important reform processes must take into consideration the timing of the reform and adjust project expectations and ambitions accordingly. (iii) Projects with a strong focus on capacity building need to be more realistic about what can be achieved within the project lifetime. (iv) Innovative projects like the PPENT should devote more attention to capture learning from implementation.

Mozambique: Southern Africa Regional Gas Project (PPAR)

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When the Southern Africa Regional Gas Project (SARGP) was approved in November 2003, Mozambique had seen strong economic growth since the end of the civil war in 1992 but faced challenges in improving its business environment and attracting foreign investment. Although Mozambique’s gas reserves had been discovered in the 1960s, they remained undeveloped. The World Bank had provided advice and Show MoreWhen the Southern Africa Regional Gas Project (SARGP) was approved in November 2003, Mozambique had seen strong economic growth since the end of the civil war in 1992 but faced challenges in improving its business environment and attracting foreign investment. Although Mozambique’s gas reserves had been discovered in the 1960s, they remained undeveloped. The World Bank had provided advice and technical assistance to help develop the gas fields since 1991. In 2000, the government signed an agreement with the South African petrochemical company, Sasol, under which Sasol would develop the gas reserves in Mozambique and export natural gas to South Africa over a 25-year period. The stated objective of the SARGP was to help: “initiate the development and export of Mozambique’s substantial natural gas resources in an environmentally sustainable manner, thereby contributing towards economic growth and poverty reduction in Mozambique.” The project ratings are as follows: Outcome was satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was negligible to low, Bank performance was satisfactory, and Borrower performance was satisfactory. Lessons from this experience include: (i) The PRG instrument can provide distinct risk mitigation to support a first-of-kind public-private partnership project in an untested policy and regulatory environment. (ii) Even as a late entrant into a project’s financing structure, the Bank Group can leverage its presence to enhance E&S safeguards and community development initiatives. (iii) Some flexibility in concession agreements to review price mechanism clauses in the event of extreme divergence from initial assumptions can help enhance long-term viability of a public-private partnership project. (iv) Coordination of corporate local community development initiatives with local government programs can help enhance their sustainability. (v) Proactive measures by the sponsor company to develop local suppliers are likely to be needed to ensure upstream linkages in extractive industry projects.

Carbon Markets for Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction in a Warming World

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Carbon Markets for Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction in a Warming World
This evaluation assesses the role and contributions of the World Bank Group in Carbon Finance (CF) in relation to the needs and priorities of its client countries, its potential comparative advantages, and draws lessons to inform the Bank Group's future strategic direction in CF.This evaluation assesses the role and contributions of the World Bank Group in Carbon Finance (CF) in relation to the needs and priorities of its client countries, its potential comparative advantages, and draws lessons to inform the Bank Group's future strategic direction in CF.

World Bank Group Support to Health Services: Achievements and Challenges

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World Bank Group Support to Health Services: Achievements and Challenges
This evaluation assesses the roles and contributions of the World Bank Group in supporting health services in client countries and provides lessons and recommendations for achieving greater development effectiveness going forward.This evaluation assesses the roles and contributions of the World Bank Group in supporting health services in client countries and provides lessons and recommendations for achieving greater development effectiveness going forward.

China: ShiZheng Railway Project (PPAR)

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Railways are vital to China’s social and economic development. As a large economy with a vast geographical area and a huge population, China has massive volumes of passenger and freight traffic moving over medium to long distances. Because of the high demand for rail services, railways are one of the most economic and effective means of transport for the medium- to long-distance transport market Show MoreRailways are vital to China’s social and economic development. As a large economy with a vast geographical area and a huge population, China has massive volumes of passenger and freight traffic moving over medium to long distances. Because of the high demand for rail services, railways are one of the most economic and effective means of transport for the medium- to long-distance transport market in China. They are also more energy-efficient and environment-friendly than other transport modes on a comparable capacity basis. The World Bank initiated a programmatic engagement with China’s railways in 2008 through a program of six projects to support construction of priority high-speed railway (HSR) lines. The program was also intended to be a platform for the World Bank to continue its policy dialogue with the government on railway sector reform. The ShiZheng Railway Project was the first of the six projects. The project’s original objectives were to meet the growing freight and passenger market demand in the railway corridor section between Shijiazhuang and Zhengzhou while substantially improving the level of service offered to customers. After the restructuring in 2012, a new objective was added – to improve the maintenance of the catenary system on high-speed rail lines – but the original objectives were unchanged. Ratings from the project are as follows: Outcome was satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was negligible, Bank performance was satisfactory, and Borrower performance was satisfactory. The following lessons are drawn from the project experience: (i) Sound technical design, project preparation, and implementation management, combined with assured financial resources and effective interinstitutional collaboration, are a recipe for success for a complex HSR project. (ii) Effective high speed railway systems require certain preconditions. (iii) Successful reforms in large and complex infrastructure sectors such as railways involve sustained policy changes supported through long-term policy dialogue and engagements. (iv) Agglomeration effects are an important benefit of high-speed rail development and could be incorporated in the cost-benefit analysis of such projects. (v) Good connections of HSR lines with other transport modes and between the rail stations and urban centers are critical to achieving the full benefits of high-speed trains.

Liberia CLR Review FY13-17

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Liberia is a low-income country with a GNI per capita (Atlas method) of 380 US dollars in 2017. After a period of conflict and instability, Liberia's Gross Domestic Product (GDP) grew at an average annual rate of 6.2 percent during 2003-2013. The ebola virus disease (EVD) crisis of 2014-2016 and a drop in global commodity prices resulted in slower average annual GDP growth of 2.1 percent with per Show MoreLiberia is a low-income country with a GNI per capita (Atlas method) of 380 US dollars in 2017. After a period of conflict and instability, Liberia's Gross Domestic Product (GDP) grew at an average annual rate of 6.2 percent during 2003-2013. The ebola virus disease (EVD) crisis of 2014-2016 and a drop in global commodity prices resulted in slower average annual GDP growth of 2.1 percent with per capita annual GDP growth at -0.4 percent during 2013-2017. As a post conflict country aiming to achieve sustained broad-based growth, Liberia faces several development challenges: large infrastructure gaps, poor education and health indicators, a large youth cohort, lack of economic diversification, and weak public institutions. The World Bank Group's country partnership strategy had three pillars: (i) economic transformation; (ii) human development; and (iii) governance and public sector institutions. In addition, the CPS had two cross-cutting themes of capacity development and gender equality. The CPS focus areas and objectives were well aligned with the government's agenda for transformation with a strong focus on infrastructure. The CLR provided a succinct assessment of the achievement of program objectives. It identified the increases in IDA lending attributable to the EVD outbreak. The CLR review agrees with the CLR lessons: (i) ensure government's strong commitment to the CPF program through close alignment with the country's development plans; (ii) adapt and apply a sound post-conflict and fragile country lens in the design of CPF programs for post conflict countries; (iii) keep an eye on medium-term goals even in the face of a crisis such as EVD; (iv) being selective about cross-cutting themes and including outcomes associated with these themes helps maintain the Government's and Country Team's focus on them throughout implementation. IEG provides the following additional lessons: (i) flexibility of the CPS program enabled the WBG to respond to the EVD crisis in a timely manner; and (ii) trust fund activities need to have a well-articulated strategic focus and explicit selectivity filters to ensure that they contribute to the achievement of CPS objectives.

An Independent Evaluation of the World Bank Group’s Support to Mexico (2008–17)

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An Independent Evaluation of the World Bank Group’s Support to Mexico
This evaluation assesses the development effectiveness of the World Bank Group’s country program in Mexico between 2008 and 2017.This evaluation assesses the development effectiveness of the World Bank Group’s country program in Mexico between 2008 and 2017.

Kyrgyz Republic CLR Review FY14-17

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The Kyrgyz Republic is a lower middle-income country with a GNI per capita of $1,100 in 2016. It is a country with a land-locked and mountainous geography, and rich in mineral and water resources. GDP growth averaged 3.7 percent during the CPS period (2014-17), somewhat below the average during the previous four years (4.0 percent). Gold production and worker remittances have been significant Show MoreThe Kyrgyz Republic is a lower middle-income country with a GNI per capita of $1,100 in 2016. It is a country with a land-locked and mountainous geography, and rich in mineral and water resources. GDP growth averaged 3.7 percent during the CPS period (2014-17), somewhat below the average during the previous four years (4.0 percent). Gold production and worker remittances have been significant drivers of growth, but are subject to volatility and do not lend themselves to sustained growth. Growth helped reduce poverty rates, from the recent peak of 38.0 percent in 2012 to 25.4 percent in 2015. Nevertheless, the country’s Human Development Index improved slightly from 0.656 in 2013 (ranked 125nd among 187 countries) to 0.664 in 2015 (ranked 120th among 188 countries). Inequality (the GINI Index) declined from 28.8 in 2013 to 26.8 in 2016, Policy effectiveness has been undermined by high levels of corruption and frequent changes in Government. Kyrgyz’s rank in Transparency International’s Corruption Perception Index deteriorated from 123rd of 167 in 2015 to 135th of 167 in 2017. During the CPS period, there were five different prime ministers. The World Bank Group’s (WBG) CPS had three pillars (or focus areas): (i) public administration and public service delivery, (ii) business environment and investment climate, and (iii) natural resources and physical infrastructure. The CPS was aligned with the Government’s National Sustainable Development Strategy (NSDS), 2013-2017, specifically with NSDS objectives on public administration, judiciary, social services, financial and private sector development, agribusiness, exports, environmental protection/resource management, energy, transport, and urban development. These objectives were part of the NSDS broad focus on governance, state building, and economic development. WBG’s support was also aligned with a number of specific government programs (e.g., the Governance and Anti-Corruption Plan adopted in 2012).

Inclusive Growth: A Synthesis of Findings from Recent IEG Evaluations

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Inclusive Growth: A Synthesis of Findings from Recent IEG Evaluations
This report extracts findings and distills lessons from all relevant IEG evaluations completed between FY10 and FY18 to shed light on the nature and results of the Bank Group’s support in key areas of inclusive growth. This report extracts findings and distills lessons from all relevant IEG evaluations completed between FY10 and FY18 to shed light on the nature and results of the Bank Group’s support in key areas of inclusive growth.

Engaging Citizens for Better Development Results

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Engaging Citizens for Better Development Results
This evaluation assesses how effectively the World Bank Group has mainstreamed citizen engagement at the project, country, and corporate levels, and demonstrates how this process contributes to the achievement of development outcomes.This evaluation assesses how effectively the World Bank Group has mainstreamed citizen engagement at the project, country, and corporate levels, and demonstrates how this process contributes to the achievement of development outcomes.