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Results and Performance of the World Bank Group (RAP) 2016

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results and performance of the world bank group 2016, rap 2016
This year’s Results and Performance of the World Bank Group review report addresses the theme of managing for development results (M4R).This year’s Results and Performance of the World Bank Group review report addresses the theme of managing for development results (M4R).

World Bank Group Country Engagement: An Early-Stage Assessment of the Systematic Country Diagnostic and Country Partnership Framework

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World Bank Group Country Engagement: An Early-Stage Assessment of the Systematic Country Diagnostic and Country Partnership
This evaluation, undertaken at the request of the Board of Executive Directors, provides an early look at how the SCD/CPF process is working, and identifies ways to strengthen the new country engagement model as it continues to unfold.This evaluation, undertaken at the request of the Board of Executive Directors, provides an early look at how the SCD/CPF process is working, and identifies ways to strengthen the new country engagement model as it continues to unfold.

Crisis Response and Resilience to Systemic Shocks: Lessons from IEG Evaluations

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The topic of resilience has gained prominence on the development agenda. Many of the Sustainable Development Goals relate to resilience.1 In the World Bank’s new strategy adopted in October 2013—achieving the twin goals of eliminating extreme poverty and boosting shared prosperity in a sustainable manner—resilience is at the heart of the three-pronged view of sustainability: fiscal, social, and Show MoreThe topic of resilience has gained prominence on the development agenda. Many of the Sustainable Development Goals relate to resilience.1 In the World Bank’s new strategy adopted in October 2013—achieving the twin goals of eliminating extreme poverty and boosting shared prosperity in a sustainable manner—resilience is at the heart of the three-pronged view of sustainability: fiscal, social, and environmental sustainability. This synthesis of existing evaluations seeks to draw lessons from key IEG evaluations of World Bank Group support for strengthening client country response and resilience to systemic shocks.

Crisis Response and Resilience to Systemic Shocks: Lessons from IEG Evaluations

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Crisis Response and Resilience to Systemic Shocks: Lessons from IEG Evaluations
This synthesis of existing evaluations seeks to draw lessons from key IEG evaluations of World Bank Group support for strengthening client country response and resilience to systemic shocks.This synthesis of existing evaluations seeks to draw lessons from key IEG evaluations of World Bank Group support for strengthening client country response and resilience to systemic shocks.

Mozambique CLR Review FY12-15

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Mozambique is a low income country with a GNI per capita of $1,120 in 2014. The country experienced rapid growth over the last 25 years, but high poverty rates persist, particularly in the rural areas. Data from the National Statistics Institute show that the poverty headcount ratio fell from 70 to 46 percent between 1996 and 2014. The country’s reliance on capital intensive investments led to Show MoreMozambique is a low income country with a GNI per capita of $1,120 in 2014. The country experienced rapid growth over the last 25 years, but high poverty rates persist, particularly in the rural areas. Data from the National Statistics Institute show that the poverty headcount ratio fell from 70 to 46 percent between 1996 and 2014. The country’s reliance on capital intensive investments led to rapid economic growth but generated relatively few jobs and their ties to the rest of the economy are limited. Unemployment rate remained at 22.6 percent in 2012-2014. The country ranks low in Human Development Index: 180 out of 188 countries. Natural hazards hit the country frequently and hard, and are likely to worsen with climate change. The government’s Action Plan to Reduce Poverty for 2011-2014 (Plano de Acção de Redução de Pobreza -PARP) sought to confront these problems and the WBG’s Country partnership Strategy (CPS) addressed some of these challenges under the pillars of competitiveness and employment (Focus Area I), vulnerability and resilience (Focus Area II), and a foundation pillar, governance and public sector capacity (Focus Area III). In April 2016, the government acknowledged to the IMF that it had borrowed an amount in excess of $1 billion in commercial terms during 2012-2015. The disclosure weakened investors’ confidence in the country’s macroeconomic stability, and contributed to further depreciating the metical. These two factors combined raised the country’s debt to GDP ratio from 60 percent in 2014 to 120 percent in 2016.

Engaging Citizens for Better Development Results: An IEG Evaluation of World Bank Group Citizen Engagement (Approach Paper)

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This proposed evaluation aims to inform the Board and Management of the World Bank Group on the effectiveness of World Bank Group citizen engagement (CE) activities to support development processes and outcomes. This is the first IEG evaluation that systematically reviews the World Bank Group CE efforts (including IFC and MIGA). CE is the umbrella term adopted by the World Bank Group to denote a Show MoreThis proposed evaluation aims to inform the Board and Management of the World Bank Group on the effectiveness of World Bank Group citizen engagement (CE) activities to support development processes and outcomes. This is the first IEG evaluation that systematically reviews the World Bank Group CE efforts (including IFC and MIGA). CE is the umbrella term adopted by the World Bank Group to denote a multitude of different interactions with a variety of stakeholders—such as government, private sector, and development institutions, including the World Bank Group—at different points in the project or program cycle that give citizens a stake in decision making with the objective of improving development outcomes. It is a two-way relationship that implies the existence of a tangible response to citizens’ feedback.

Argentina: Buenos Aires Urban Transport Project (Project Performance Assessment Report)

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This Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) assesses the development effectiveness of the Buenos Aires Urban Transport Project in Argentina. The project’s objectives were to support joint private sector–public sector initiatives to improve the service quality and coverage of mass transit in metropolitan Buenos Aires; support the implementation of the infrastructure improvement obligations Show MoreThis Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) assesses the development effectiveness of the Buenos Aires Urban Transport Project in Argentina. The project’s objectives were to support joint private sector–public sector initiatives to improve the service quality and coverage of mass transit in metropolitan Buenos Aires; support the implementation of the infrastructure improvement obligations assumed by private concessionaires regarding the metropolitan Buenos Aires passenger rail system; assist in improving traffic safety and urban transport–related environmental quality in metropolitan Buenos Aires; and contribute toward the development of an integrated urban transport (road and rail) system for metropolitan Buenos Aires, and later, to assist in developing integrated urban transport strategies in metropolitan areas in Argentina, including Cordoba, Mendoza, Posadas, Rosario, and Tucuman. Ratings for the Buenos Aires Urban Transport Project in Argentina were as follows: outcome was moderately satisfactory, the risk to development outcome was significant, the Bank performance was moderately satisfactory, and the Borrower performance was moderately satisfactory. Some lessons learned included: (i) Private sector participation cannot achieve efficiency gains if incentives are misaligned. (ii) The creation of new institutions brings long-term gains and benefits when voluntary association and political will are present, as international experience also shows. (iii) Potential fiduciary problems are difficult to detect, which emphasizes the critical importance of training project staff.

Lao People's Democratic Republic CLR Review FY12 – 16

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Lao PDR is a small, landlocked, lower middle income country that for some years has enjoyed rapid economic growth (around 7.8 percent over the past decade including the CPS period). In 2015, GNI per capita was $1,740, which was below Vietnam ($1,990) but well above Cambodia ($1,070). While poverty has been reduced, inequality has been rising and growth has not been inclusive. The latest available Show MoreLao PDR is a small, landlocked, lower middle income country that for some years has enjoyed rapid economic growth (around 7.8 percent over the past decade including the CPS period). In 2015, GNI per capita was $1,740, which was below Vietnam ($1,990) but well above Cambodia ($1,070). While poverty has been reduced, inequality has been rising and growth has not been inclusive. The latest available Gini index of 37.8 in 2012 shows a noticeable increase from 34.6 in 2002. For the same period, Lao PDR Gini index is about the same level as Vietnam (38.7), but much higher than Cambodia (30.7). The CPS focused on stronger public sector management as a cross-cutting theme, with three strategic thematic areas: competitiveness and connectivity, sustainable natural resource management, and inclusive development. The CPS and the CPSPR addressed important priorities and drew on lessons from the previous program, including on the critical importance of capacity building that needed to be embedded into broader sectoral programs rather than through separate activities. However, it is not clear to what extent the program actually succeeded in this regard, and only a few of the objectives and/or outcome indicators in the CPS/CPS Progress Report results matrix seem to relate to capacity building.

Arab Republic of Egypt: Second Pollution Abatement Project (Project Performance Assessment Report)

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Egypt’s rapid population growth (from 36 million in 1973 to 91.5 million in 2015), combined with its economic development and industrialization policies and weak environmental management, have resulted in widespread and severe pollution of Egypt’s critical air, water, and soil resources. In recent decades, the government of Egypt has increasingly attempted to address the pollution threats to its Show MoreEgypt’s rapid population growth (from 36 million in 1973 to 91.5 million in 2015), combined with its economic development and industrialization policies and weak environmental management, have resulted in widespread and severe pollution of Egypt’s critical air, water, and soil resources. In recent decades, the government of Egypt has increasingly attempted to address the pollution threats to its public health and environmental conditions, seeking support for its efforts from international financing institutions and bilateral donors. Ratings for the Second Pollution Abatement Project in Egypt were as follows: Outcome was satisfactory, risk to development was significant, Bank performance was moderately satisfactory, and Borrower performance was satisfactory. Lessons from the report included: (i) Though the use of concessionary financing can be effective in triggering private investments in pollution abatement, operations that rely on donor funding for such financing risk not being scaled up to the point where they can have a major impact on desired pollution outcomes, because of the inherent limitations on the availability of donor funding. (ii) The “carrot and stick” approach employed by the EPAP II model suggests that the appropriate use of financial incentives (concessionary financing) backed by potential administrative/legal threats (environmental enforcement actions) can promote industrial compliance in a country where enforcement strategies alone have been insufficient to generate compliance, especially in the early stages of tackling national pollution. (iii) The use of continuous environmental monitoring systems at industrial sites represents best practice for pollution control projects. (iv) With the uncertainties surrounding the carbon finance market, World Bank operations involving carbon finance–linked projects should undergo careful preparation, delinking implementation schedules if necessary, to avoid risks that may occur during processing. (v) Ensuring careful alignment between project objective and project design is critical to avoiding confusion in determining whether a project has achieved its goals. (vi) Managed carefully, the World Bank’s role in organizing collaboration among its development partners can significantly enhance its ability to scale up its operations in the environmental management sector. (vi) Environmental operations that rely on a credit line mechanism may be limited in their ability to target the most serious pollution issues because of requirements for creditworthiness.

Tax Revenue Mobilization - Lessons from World Bank Group Support for Tax Reform

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This learning note reviews existing IEG evaluative evidence on the Bank Group’s support to tax policy and administration reform produced by the Independent Evaluation Group over FY2005-15. It identifies the drivers of performance as well as lessons to inform the future work of the Bank Group. This learning note reviews existing IEG evaluative evidence on the Bank Group’s support to tax policy and administration reform produced by the Independent Evaluation Group over FY2005-15. It identifies the drivers of performance as well as lessons to inform the future work of the Bank Group.