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Kyrgyz Republic: Village Investment Project and Second Village Investment Project (PPAR)

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This is a Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) of the Village Investment Project (VIP 1) and the Second Village Investment Project (VIP 2), implemented from 2003 to 2014. Both VIP projects were designed against a backdrop of persistent rural poverty, a vacuum in the supply of local infrastructure services, a lack of economic opportunities, and a nascent decentralization agenda. Project Show MoreThis is a Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) of the Village Investment Project (VIP 1) and the Second Village Investment Project (VIP 2), implemented from 2003 to 2014. Both VIP projects were designed against a backdrop of persistent rural poverty, a vacuum in the supply of local infrastructure services, a lack of economic opportunities, and a nascent decentralization agenda. Project design incorporated lessons from implementing a community-based pilot financed by the Japanese Social Development Fund (JSDF) and information from extensive consultations conducted as part of the thorough project preparation. High capacity and excellent support from the implementing agency created by the project were crucial factors in their successful and rapid implementation of the projects. Ratings for the Village Investment Project were as follows: Outcome was satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was moderate, World Bank performance was satisfactory, and Borrower performance was satisfactory. Ratings for the Second Village Investment Project were: Outcome was satisfactory, Risk to development outcome was moderate, World Bank performance was satisfactory, and Borrower performance was satisfactory. Lessons from the project include: (i) Multiple tranches of village-level financing in CDD projects can reinforce and strengthen participatory planning over time. This approach can also lower the risk of elite capture. (ii) CDD programs implemented nationally can enhance political legitimacy, especially in countries with ethnic or regional tensions. Although a move to consolidate project activities can magnify local economic gains, these consolidations carry the risk of perceptions of favoritism of one group over another. (iii) In rapidly scaled out CDD programs there is a need to pay simultaneous attention to social outreach and infrastructure quality. Poor infrastructure can undermine program legitimacy and create a public safety risk. (iv) Investments in small-scale enterprises require an upstream diagnosis of capacity and constraints and the interventions should be targeted to address known binding constraints.

Mali: Project to Support Grassroots Initiatives to Fight Hunger and Poverty (PPAR)

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This is a project performance review of the Grassroots Hunger and Poverty Initiative Project (PAIB) financed by the International Development Association (IDA) and implemented between 1998 and 2004 across two regions of Mali (Mopti and Tombouctou). Original financing was anticipated to be $23 million, including a $21.5 million IDA credit and $1.5 million borrower contribution. Actual costs were $ Show MoreThis is a project performance review of the Grassroots Hunger and Poverty Initiative Project (PAIB) financed by the International Development Association (IDA) and implemented between 1998 and 2004 across two regions of Mali (Mopti and Tombouctou). Original financing was anticipated to be $23 million, including a $21.5 million IDA credit and $1.5 million borrower contribution. Actual costs were $23.2 million. The project sought to improve the living conditions of disadvantaged targeted rural communities, responding to their priority needs by strengthening the capacity of communities in identifying and ranking their priority needs and in planning, implementing, and supervising actions to respond to those needs in partnership with nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and local authorities. In parallel, it also sought to strengthen institutional and policy-making capacity at the local and national levels in the fight against hunger and poverty.

The International Finance Corporation’s Approach to Engaging Clients for Increased Development Impact

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IFC Client Engagement
Client engagement is essential for the IFC to support the private sector, maximize finance for development, and contribute to achieving the World Bank Group's twin goals. This IEG evaluation assesses how the IFC has implemented its strategic approach to client engagement since the early 2000s, and its effects on IFC's clients and the development impact of its operations.Client engagement is essential for the IFC to support the private sector, maximize finance for development, and contribute to achieving the World Bank Group's twin goals. This IEG evaluation assesses how the IFC has implemented its strategic approach to client engagement since the early 2000s, and its effects on IFC's clients and the development impact of its operations.

A Thirst for Change: An Evaluation of the World Bank Group’s Support for Water Supply and Sanitation with Focus on the Poor

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A Thirst for Change
This evaluation assesses the World Bank Group’s effectiveness in supporting improved access to adequate, reliable, and sustained water and sanitation services in client countries. It also examines how well the Bank Group is equipped to support the countries in moving toward sustained water and sanitation services for all, with a focus on the poor, in keeping with Sustainable Development Goal 6.This evaluation assesses the World Bank Group’s effectiveness in supporting improved access to adequate, reliable, and sustained water and sanitation services in client countries. It also examines how well the Bank Group is equipped to support the countries in moving toward sustained water and sanitation services for all, with a focus on the poor, in keeping with Sustainable Development Goal 6.

Knowledge Flow and Collaboration Under the World Bank's New Operating Model (Approach Paper)

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This evaluation will assess whether operational structures, processes, and behaviors embedded in the World Bank’s new operating model (that is, the model associated with the Global Practices and Cross-cutting Solutions Areas) have thus far stimulated knowledge flow and collaboration as means to advancing the Bank Group’s goals and strategies. As an early-stage, or formative, evaluation, findings Show MoreThis evaluation will assess whether operational structures, processes, and behaviors embedded in the World Bank’s new operating model (that is, the model associated with the Global Practices and Cross-cutting Solutions Areas) have thus far stimulated knowledge flow and collaboration as means to advancing the Bank Group’s goals and strategies. As an early-stage, or formative, evaluation, findings will reflect the initial implementation of the model, helping to identify emerging lessons and inform course corrections. Recent years has been a time of change in the World Bank Group. New goals and strategies have been combined with a number of reforms to internal structures and processes. This evaluation will focus specifically on reforms to the World Bank operating model and, within that, on reforms aimed at enhancing knowledge flow and collaboration. Enhancing knowledge flow and collaboration across Regions, sectors, and World Bank Group institutions was a prominent goal of the 2013 World Bank Group (WBG) Strategy and the creation of the Global Practices (GPs) and Cross-cutting Solutions Areas (CCSAs).

Towards Urban Resilience: An Evaluation of the World Bank Group’s Evolving Approach 2007-2017 (Approach Paper)

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Half of humanity – 3.5 billion people – lives in cities today and by 2030, 60% of the world’s population will live in urban areas. Urbanization has the potential to lift people out of poverty and increase prosperity, yet rapid urbanization and unmanaged growth, tend to generate unsustainable land use, which is nearly impossible to change after a city grows. The urban poor are disproportionally Show MoreHalf of humanity – 3.5 billion people – lives in cities today and by 2030, 60% of the world’s population will live in urban areas. Urbanization has the potential to lift people out of poverty and increase prosperity, yet rapid urbanization and unmanaged growth, tend to generate unsustainable land use, which is nearly impossible to change after a city grows. The urban poor are disproportionally affected by chronic stress and shocks. The international community has recognized the importance of achieving sustainable and inclusive urban development by increasing attention to the resilience of cities. The purpose of this evaluation is to provide evaluative insights on the WBG’s role in helping clients foster urban resilience in the face of shocks, threats and chronic stress. The specific objective of this evaluation is to assess how well the WBG is helping clients to build urban resilience – to cope, recover, adapt and transform - in the face of shocks and chronic stress as the World Bank Group seeks to scale up its advice and investment in this domain. The evaluation will place attention on how urban resilience initiatives are linked to the Bank’s broader poverty reduction goals.

Rwanda Country Program Evaluation FY09-17 (Approach Paper)

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The primary goal of this evaluation is to assess the Bank Group’s development effectiveness in Rwanda during the period FY09-17 and to inform the design and implementation of future WBG activities in Rwanda. The Country Program Evaluation (CPE) will place strong emphasis on assessing World Bank Group (WBG) strategic positioning and program delivery to help Rwanda achieve its development goals, Show MoreThe primary goal of this evaluation is to assess the Bank Group’s development effectiveness in Rwanda during the period FY09-17 and to inform the design and implementation of future WBG activities in Rwanda. The Country Program Evaluation (CPE) will place strong emphasis on assessing World Bank Group (WBG) strategic positioning and program delivery to help Rwanda achieve its development goals, notably to become a lower middle income country by 2020. The selection of Rwanda for this CPE – one of two undertaken by IEG in FY18 – is motivated by the country’s important development achievements during the period of analysis as well as by the major challenges the country faces in order to sustain those gains going forward. The CPE seeks to provide inputs for the next Country Partnership Framework (CPF).

Two to Tango: An Evaluation of World Bank Group Support for Fostering Regional Integration (Approach Paper)

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Three overlapping forces shape economic and political systems in the contemporary world order: globalization, regionalism and nationalism. The first wave of regionalism in the 1960-1980 was primarily driven by the trade and tariff agenda, followed by the second wave in the 1980-2000 when regionalism was seen as a useful supplement to multilateralism. Today, in the context of emerging market and Show MoreThree overlapping forces shape economic and political systems in the contemporary world order: globalization, regionalism and nationalism. The first wave of regionalism in the 1960-1980 was primarily driven by the trade and tariff agenda, followed by the second wave in the 1980-2000 when regionalism was seen as a useful supplement to multilateralism. Today, in the context of emerging market and developing economies, the new dimensions of regionalism include interactions beyond trade, and can potentially encompasses hard infrastructure, institutional alignments, labor and capital flows. This evaluation focuses on regional integration (RI), which the World Bank Group (WBG) defines as economic interactions across at least two sovereign jurisdictions that are geographically close and resulting in integration of factors and goods, and coordination of policy. According to the 2013 World Bank Group Strategy, transformational engagements are about regional integration, involving both game-changing investments and actions to address policy constraints that require a coordinated response by several countries. Most transformational engagements entail partnerships in which the WBG may play a leading or supporting role. This evaluation is classified under the IEG Strategic Engagement Area (SEA), Inclusive and Sustainable Economic Growth.

Toward a Clean World for All: An Evaluation of the World Bank Group’s Support to Pollution Management

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Toward a Clean World for All
IEG’s first comprehensive assessment of pollution management efforts examines the extent to which the World Bank Group has been relevant, effective, and efficient in addressing pollution concerns in client countries.IEG’s first comprehensive assessment of pollution management efforts examines the extent to which the World Bank Group has been relevant, effective, and efficient in addressing pollution concerns in client countries.

Mexico Country Program Evaluation FY08-17 (Approach Paper)

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The core purpose of this document is to assess the development effectiveness of the World Bank Group country program in Mexico between FY2008 and FY2017. While Mexico has been a member of the OECD since 1994, its per capita GNI is the lowest among OECD members – 58 percent below the OECD average in 2016, in PPP terms – and its poverty rate is the highest in that group of mostly high income Show MoreThe core purpose of this document is to assess the development effectiveness of the World Bank Group country program in Mexico between FY2008 and FY2017. While Mexico has been a member of the OECD since 1994, its per capita GNI is the lowest among OECD members – 58 percent below the OECD average in 2016, in PPP terms – and its poverty rate is the highest in that group of mostly high income countries. Compared to upper middle income countries (UMICs), however, Mexico’s per capita GNI is 7 percent above the average of that group. Its latest, 2014 poverty rate, 5.7 percent, is comparatively low, measured using the international poverty line of $1.9 in 2011 PPP terms, but it is much higher, at 11.7 and 27.5 percent, if measured at poverty lines of $2.5 and $4, respectively (2005 PPP). The Government of Mexico’s strategic priorities have been focused on unlocking the country’s full potential, in terms not only of economic growth, but also of improved human development, gender equity, environmental protection and enhanced democratic governance and security. Over the period of analysis, the WBG aligned its strategic priorities with those embedded in the National Development Plans of two successive presidential administrations. The CPE will assess the WBG’s contributions to Mexico’s achievements in each of the Group’s priority areas of engagement. It will also evaluate the extent to which the WBG took advantage of potential synergies between the financial, knowledge and convening services that WBG institutions offered across its various engagement areas, to maximize overall contributions to Mexico’s national development goals.