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Toward a Clean World for All: An Evaluation of the World Bank Group’s Support to Pollution Management

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Toward a Clean World for All
IEG’s first comprehensive assessment of pollution management efforts examines the extent to which the World Bank Group has been relevant, effective, and efficient in addressing pollution concerns in client countries.IEG’s first comprehensive assessment of pollution management efforts examines the extent to which the World Bank Group has been relevant, effective, and efficient in addressing pollution concerns in client countries.

Mexico Country Program Evaluation FY08-17

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The core purpose of this document is to assess the development effectiveness of the World Bank Group country program in Mexico between FY2008 and FY2017. While Mexico has been a member of the OECD since 1994, its per capita GNI is the lowest among OECD members – 58 percent below the OECD average in 2016, in PPP terms – and its poverty rate is the highest in that group of mostly high income Show MoreThe core purpose of this document is to assess the development effectiveness of the World Bank Group country program in Mexico between FY2008 and FY2017. While Mexico has been a member of the OECD since 1994, its per capita GNI is the lowest among OECD members – 58 percent below the OECD average in 2016, in PPP terms – and its poverty rate is the highest in that group of mostly high income countries. Compared to upper middle income countries (UMICs), however, Mexico’s per capita GNI is 7 percent above the average of that group. Its latest, 2014 poverty rate, 5.7 percent, is comparatively low, measured using the international poverty line of $1.9 in 2011 PPP terms, but it is much higher, at 11.7 and 27.5 percent, if measured at poverty lines of $2.5 and $4, respectively (2005 PPP). The Government of Mexico’s strategic priorities have been focused on unlocking the country’s full potential, in terms not only of economic growth, but also of improved human development, gender equity, environmental protection and enhanced democratic governance and security. Over the period of analysis, the WBG aligned its strategic priorities with those embedded in the National Development Plans of two successive presidential administrations. The CPE will assess the WBG’s contributions to Mexico’s achievements in each of the Group’s priority areas of engagement. It will also evaluate the extent to which the WBG took advantage of potential synergies between the financial, knowledge and convening services that WBG institutions offered across its various engagement areas, to maximize overall contributions to Mexico’s national development goals.

Growth for the Bottom 40 Percent: The World Bank Group’s Support for Shared Prosperity

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Growth for the Bottom 40 Percent
This evaluation assesses the World Bank Group's record on implementation of the shared prosperity goal since 2013, using the official definition of the goal of fostering income growth of the bottom 40 percent. It also analyzes institutional requirements for effective implementation of the goal, and evaluates the extent to which the Bank Group was already incorporating distributional issues in its Show MoreThis evaluation assesses the World Bank Group's record on implementation of the shared prosperity goal since 2013, using the official definition of the goal of fostering income growth of the bottom 40 percent. It also analyzes institutional requirements for effective implementation of the goal, and evaluates the extent to which the Bank Group was already incorporating distributional issues in its various activities during the period 2005-13, before the adoption of the goal.

An Evaluation of World Bank Group Support in Conflict Induced Situations of Forced Displacement (Approach Paper)

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This proposed evaluation aims to inform the World Bank Group’s scaling up of support to situations of forced displacement. It will focus on the World Bank Group’s emerging goals and catalytic role in countries and subregions hosting large forcibly displaced populations and providing lessons from past support to inform the World Bank Group’s position going forward. The evaluation pursues IEG’s Show MoreThis proposed evaluation aims to inform the World Bank Group’s scaling up of support to situations of forced displacement. It will focus on the World Bank Group’s emerging goals and catalytic role in countries and subregions hosting large forcibly displaced populations and providing lessons from past support to inform the World Bank Group’s position going forward. The evaluation pursues IEG’s strategic priority of providing evidence on what works and why, and it supports two of the strategic engagement areas in which IEG seeks to advance evaluative evidence: investing in people, and inclusive and sustainable economic growth. The evaluation effort is timed to be an input for the IDA18 mid-term review and IDA19 discussions.

Growing the Rural Non-Farm Economy to Alleviate Poverty

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Growing the Rural Non-Farm Economy to Alleviate Poverty
This evaluation assesses the World Bank Group's contribution to the creation of sustainable income generation for the poor within the rural non-farm economy and the extent to which this has led to reduced poverty.This evaluation assesses the World Bank Group's contribution to the creation of sustainable income generation for the poor within the rural non-farm economy and the extent to which this has led to reduced poverty.

The Power to Renew: Evaluation of the World Bank Group’s Support to Electricity Supply from Renewable Energy Resources

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This report evaluates how effectively the World Bank Group (WBG) has supported clients navigate an evolving market for renewable energy (RE) for supplying electricity to meet energy and environmental needs. It covers a dynamic period from 2000 to 2017 during which RE markets for certain technologies evolved considerably, and there was a marked scale-up of WBG activities in the sector. The Show MoreThis report evaluates how effectively the World Bank Group (WBG) has supported clients navigate an evolving market for renewable energy (RE) for supplying electricity to meet energy and environmental needs. It covers a dynamic period from 2000 to 2017 during which RE markets for certain technologies evolved considerably, and there was a marked scale-up of WBG activities in the sector. The evaluation will help determine the ability of WBG to adjust its interventions to rapidly changing conditions and deliver state-of-the-art RE solutions to clients. The evaluation is being undertaken at a time when both the international community and the WBG are placing considerable importance on RE as a key contributor to addressing global climate change. RE, which supports several global development priorities, is vital to achieving inclusive and sustainable economic growth, as per the Forward Look – A Vision for the World Bank Group in 2030. The primary audience for this evaluation is the WBG Board of Executive Directors and WBG management and operational staff. Other key audiences include development partners—especially bilateral donors and other MDBs, special partners—such as GEF, CIFs, and donors who fund ESMAP and ASTAE, WBG clients across governments and in the private sector, civil society organizations and beneficiaries impacted by the WBG’s RE activities.

Grow With the Flow: IEG Evaluation of World Bank Group Support to Facilitating Trade 2006-17

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This potential, however, is often constrained by high transaction costs related to moving goods and providing services across borders which constrain gains from trade. Lower income countries, which are more likely to suffer from high trade costs (and are more likely to face higher costs due to their land-locked, small states or fragile and conflict-affected status), tend to be disproportionately Show MoreThis potential, however, is often constrained by high transaction costs related to moving goods and providing services across borders which constrain gains from trade. Lower income countries, which are more likely to suffer from high trade costs (and are more likely to face higher costs due to their land-locked, small states or fragile and conflict-affected status), tend to be disproportionately hurt. Given the increased client demand for support in the implementation of the TFA, the purpose of this evaluation will be not only to assess the performance of the WBG in this area but also to identify lessons on whether and what needs should be done differently to better support such demand. The analysis will focus on those interventions that support directly trade. The evaluation will contribute to both learning and accountability. The learning aspect of the study will focus on drawing lessons from factors associated with successful and unsuccessful interventions and relating them to the future support provided by the WBG in the implementation of the TFA. With respect to accountability, the study will assess the ways in which WBG support to trade facilitation has achieved its stated objectives, and the extent to which those objectives were aligned with the strategies of the Bank Group, country, and relevant sectors. The primary audiences of this IEG evaluation are the WBG’s Board of Directors, Management and staff. In addition, the findings of the evaluation are expected to be of interest to Senior Management (especially the T&C GP), World Bank, IFC, and MIGA’s staff. The external audience interested in the findings may include WBG clients, partners, and stakeholders such as (i) donors and global and regional bodies involved in private sector development activities and support for trade facilitation; (ii) WBG partner institutions; (iii) non-governmental organizations (NGOs) focused on private sector development and private entities and investors with a substantial engagement in trade and trade facilitation. Depending on their engagement, such stakeholders are expected to benefit from learning about WBG experiences to model their own roles, policies, and engagements to improve competitiveness through facilitating trade

Mali - Rural Community Development Project

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This is a project performance review of the Rural Community Development Project (PACR) financed by the International Development Association (IDA) and implemented between 2005 and 2014 across four regions of Mali. Original financing was anticipated to be US$64 million including a US$60 million IDA credit and US$4 million borrower contribution. Actual costs were US$71.2 million because of two Show MoreThis is a project performance review of the Rural Community Development Project (PACR) financed by the International Development Association (IDA) and implemented between 2005 and 2014 across four regions of Mali. Original financing was anticipated to be US$64 million including a US$60 million IDA credit and US$4 million borrower contribution. Actual costs were US$71.2 million because of two additional financings. The project sought to improve the living conditions of rural communities by providing access to basic socioeconomic services and a sustainable increase in income, while promoting improved natural resource management practices. Designed at a time when Mali had just begun to operationalize its decentralization policy, by putting national and local structures in place, the project represents the World Bank’s first large-scale investment in support of this aim. This assessment was based on a review of World Bank project documentation, supplemented by several sources of primary and secondary data collected during a field mission to Mali conducted between May 8 and May 30, 2017. Secondary data collected included the original Management Information System, 2009 census data, and fiscal transfers between the National Agency for Communal and Territorial Investments (ANICT) and all project (and nonproject communes). The data for the period 2001 to 2010 was obtained from Grinnell College, and for the period 2011, 2012–17, from ANICT (there were no transfers in 2012 because of the coup d’état that occurred that year). Primary data collection gathered the perceptions of the affected commune councils and mayors, service users and service providers, and the cooperatives that received grants for private productive assets. Specifically, the assessment conducted 12 commune council group interviews and 36 cooperative group interviews. In addition, the assessment collected data on distance and population to test the project’s service delivery metrics and targets. The project assessment will provide inputs into the Independent Evaluation Group’s (IEG’s) Fiscal Decentralization and Subnational Finance and Citizen Engagement Macroevaluations.

PPAR Improving Basic Health : The World Bank’s Experience in the Philippines

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This Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) assesses two World Bank health projects in the Philippines: the National Sector Support for Health Reform Project and the Second Women’s Health and Safe Motherhood Project. The National Sector Support Project was approved in June 2006 and closed in March 2012, nine months after the original date of June 2011. The Second Women’s Health Project was Show MoreThis Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) assesses two World Bank health projects in the Philippines: the National Sector Support for Health Reform Project and the Second Women’s Health and Safe Motherhood Project. The National Sector Support Project was approved in June 2006 and closed in March 2012, nine months after the original date of June 2011. The Second Women’s Health Project was approved in April 2005 and closed in June 2013, 12 months after the original date of June 2012. For both projects, the extensions were to permit the projects additional time to finish their activities. These projects were selected for a field-based assessment for several reasons. First, both projects represented major efforts to reform the health sector in the Philippines. Second, the Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) had previously recommended both projects for further evaluation during the Implementation Completion and Results Report (ICR) review process to validate ratings. Third, the PPAR will contribute to IEG’s ongoing evaluation on the World Bank’s Support for Basic Health Services. The Philippines is classified as a lower middle-income country, with a gross national income of $3,550 per capita and an estimated population of 101.6 million in 2015. In recent years, economic growth has increased substantially between 2012 and 2016, the longest period of sustained economic growth in recent history. However, poverty and inequality remain high and persistent. At the time of both projects’ appraisal, the Philippines had seen low increases of health outcomes that were among the slowest in the region. The Philippines has a double burden of disease—both from traditional public health issues and emerging noncommunicable diseases. Health equity was a major challenge, in terms of access and health outcomes, and the high cost of healthcare contributed to impoverishment. The Philippines has long pursued health reform, built around improving equity with demand-based finance through a combination of public and private health services.

Mobile Metropolises: Urban Transport Matters

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Mobile Metropolises: Urban Transport Matters
This evaluation assesses the World Bank Group’s effectiveness in supporting countries’ efforts to achieve mobility for all (including the poor, women, and disabled persons), sustainable urban transport service delivery (from the financial and environmental perspectives), and urban transport institutional development.This evaluation assesses the World Bank Group’s effectiveness in supporting countries’ efforts to achieve mobility for all (including the poor, women, and disabled persons), sustainable urban transport service delivery (from the financial and environmental perspectives), and urban transport institutional development.