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ICT and Evaluation - Man versus Machine?

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ICT and Evaluation -  Man versus Machine?
The first in a series of reflections on the information and communication technology (ICT) revolution and how it will impact evaluation in the not-so-distant future.The first in a series of reflections on the information and communication technology (ICT) revolution and how it will impact evaluation in the not-so-distant future.

Conversations: Are multilateral development banks still relevant today?

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Conversations: Are multilateral development banks still relevant today?
Leaders from the major multilateral development banks, gathered in Rome for the Spring Meetings of the Evaluation Cooperation Group, discussed the future and relevance of multilateral development banks (MDBs).Leaders from the major multilateral development banks, gathered in Rome for the Spring Meetings of the Evaluation Cooperation Group, discussed the future and relevance of multilateral development banks (MDBs).

Third Party Monitoring in Volatile Environments - Do the Benefits Outweigh the Risks?

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Third Party Monitoring in Volatile Environments – Do the Benefits Outweigh the Risks?
The use of third party monitoring as a risk management tool in volatile countries raises important quality, ethical, and technical issues.The use of third party monitoring as a risk management tool in volatile countries raises important quality, ethical, and technical issues.

How to Tackle Global Fragility and Violence - Focus on Middle-Income Countries

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How to Tackle Global Fragility and Violence – Focus on Middle-Income Countries
When looking at fragility and conflict in a middle-income setting, the main drivers and dynamics can often be very different than in low-income countries. When looking at fragility and conflict in a middle-income setting, the main drivers and dynamics can often be very different than in low-income countries.

Emerging Lessons from Applying a New Framework for Evaluating Service Delivery

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Emerging Lessons from Applying a New Framework for Evaluating Service Delivery
We tested our new framework for service delivery by applying it to our ongoing evaluations, and, on a retrospective basis, to earlier IEG evaluations completed in recent years. This is what we've found so far.We tested our new framework for service delivery by applying it to our ongoing evaluations, and, on a retrospective basis, to earlier IEG evaluations completed in recent years. This is what we've found so far.

Kyrgyz Republic: Rural Education Project (PPAR)

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General education in the Kyrgyz Republic comprises 11 grades, one less than in most developed countries. The system is robust in both enrollment rates and access from a gender equality perspective. The primary to lower secondary transition rate is universal, and the net enrollment rate in lower secondary is about 90 percent, and in higher secondary is about 72 percent. General education is taught Show MoreGeneral education in the Kyrgyz Republic comprises 11 grades, one less than in most developed countries. The system is robust in both enrollment rates and access from a gender equality perspective. The primary to lower secondary transition rate is universal, and the net enrollment rate in lower secondary is about 90 percent, and in higher secondary is about 72 percent. General education is taught in Kyrgyz or Russian in 90 percent of schools and in Uzbek in 9.4 percent of schools. Teaching is available in more than one language in about 25 percent of schools, often leading to parallel classes being taught in different languages within the same school, resulting in increased cost of education provision. Governance in the education sector was, and continues to be weak; the Ministry of Education and Science is nominally responsible for setting education policy and providing oversight in the education sector. However, aspects of the system operate largely independent of its oversight, leading to a disconnect between funding and policy execution with associated inefficiencies. The project development objective for the $15.00 million Rural Education Project was to assist in improving learning and learning conditions in primary and secondary schools, with priority attention to rural areas. Project ratings were as follows: outcome was moderately unsatisfactory, risk to development outcome was moderate, Bank performance was moderately unsatisfactory, and Borrower performance was moderately satisfactory. Lessons include (i) A selective, and realistic approach to design is likely to create a more closely articulated link (attribution) between World Bank interventions and outcomes. (ii) Relatively inexpensive but strategically positioned interventions can have a significant effect. (iii) Robust monitoring and evaluation is a fundamental component of project management and is integral to the articulation of, and sometimes to the realization of, desired outcome. (iv) It is critical to promote and nurture collaboration with other donors in pursuit of common, strategic goals.

The Philippines: Disaster Risk Management Development Policy Loan with a Catastrophe Deferred Drawdown Option (PPAR)

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This Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) evaluates the Philippines Disaster Risk Management Development Policy Loan with a Catastrophe Deferred Drawdown Option (CAT DDO). The loan of US$500 million was approved in September 2011, fully drawn down in December 2011 when the disbursement trigger was met, and closed in October 2014. The PPAR reviews the performance of this operation based on Show MoreThis Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) evaluates the Philippines Disaster Risk Management Development Policy Loan with a Catastrophe Deferred Drawdown Option (CAT DDO). The loan of US$500 million was approved in September 2011, fully drawn down in December 2011 when the disbursement trigger was met, and closed in October 2014. The PPAR reviews the performance of this operation based on IEG and Operations Policy and Country Services (OPCS) guidelines on program evaluations. The Philippines CAT DDO aimed to enhance the capacity of the Government of the Philippines to manage the impacts of natural disasters. To this end, the program supported objectives in three policy areas: (i) strengthening the institutional capacity for disaster risk management (DRM) efforts; (ii) mainstreaming DRM into development planning; and (iii) better managing the government's fiscal exposure to natural hazard impacts. The operation was complemented by a technical assistance program from the World Bank Global Fund for Disaster Risk Reduction (GFDRR) to provide targeted support in these areas. Ratings for the Disaster Risk Management and Development Policy Loan project were as follows: outcome was satisfactory, risk to development outcome was moderate, Bank performance was satisfactory, and Borrower performance was satisfactory. Lessons gleamed from the review are: (i) The CAT DDO proved to be a useful instrument in the Philippines for achieving the dual objectives of supporting fundamental DRM reforms and providing quick-release financing for disaster recovery and reconstruction. (ii) As with all policy reforms, in-depth analytical work and well-targeted technical assistance were critical for achieving results. (iii) In the context of this operation, there were multiple confusions over the purposes of a CAT DDO and the use of the loan proceeds, which call for further clarification in World Bank documents and better communication.

Colombia: Disaster Risk Management Development Policy Loan (PPAR)

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This Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) evaluates the Colombia Disaster Risk Management Development Policy Loan with a catastrophe deferred drawdown option (CAT DDO). The loan of $150 million was approved on December 18, 2008, became effective on June 25, 2009, and closed on January 31, 2012. The PPAR reviews the performance of the operation based on Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) Show MoreThis Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) evaluates the Colombia Disaster Risk Management Development Policy Loan with a catastrophe deferred drawdown option (CAT DDO). The loan of $150 million was approved on December 18, 2008, became effective on June 25, 2009, and closed on January 31, 2012. The PPAR reviews the performance of the operation based on Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) and Operations Policy and Country Services guidelines on program evaluations. The loan sought to strengthen the government’s program for reducing risks resulting from adverse natural events. Ratings for the Disaster Risk Management Development Policy Loan project were as follows: outcome was satisfactory, risk to development outcome was negligible to low, Bank performance was moderately satisfactory, and Borrower performance was satisfactory. Lessons include (i) The CAT DDO can help advance the DRM reform agenda and strengthen the clients’ system to respond to disaster risks. (ii) The CAT DDO can complement other World Bank instruments for supporting DRM reforms. (iii) The design and implementation of the CAT DDO in Colombia raised some issues that deserve further clarification.

Sri Lanka: Second Community Water Supply and Sanitation Project (PPAR)

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This Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) assesses the development effectiveness of the Second Community Water Supply and Sanitation Project in Sri Lanka. The objective of the project was to increase service coverage and achieve effective and sustained use of water and sanitation services in rural communities in Sri Lanka. Project ratings were as follows: outcome was moderately Show MoreThis Project Performance Assessment Report (PPAR) assesses the development effectiveness of the Second Community Water Supply and Sanitation Project in Sri Lanka. The objective of the project was to increase service coverage and achieve effective and sustained use of water and sanitation services in rural communities in Sri Lanka. Project ratings were as follows: outcome was moderately satisfactory, risk to development outcome was substantial, Bank performance was moderately satisfactory, and Borrower performance was moderately satisfactory. Lessons from this report include: (i) Lack of continuity in M&E and its utilization by an implementing agency beyond project completion undermines sustainability of development outcomes. (ii) Technical soundness of initial design and quality of construction affect performance of CBOs. (iii) Strong a115781nd consistent institutional and technical support is needed to achieve sustainable service delivery in CBO schemes. (iv) Proactive and adaptive project supervision in response to exogenous events can help safeguard project efficacy.

Brazil: Pernambuco Education Results and Accountability Project (PPAR)

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The request for this project was initiated in 2008 by the State Government of Pernambuco and the government of Brazil. At the time, improving education quality, efficiency, equity and sector management were priorities for the State Government of Pernambuco. Challenges at the time of project preparation were the flow of students and the quality of education in fundamental and secondary education, Show MoreThe request for this project was initiated in 2008 by the State Government of Pernambuco and the government of Brazil. At the time, improving education quality, efficiency, equity and sector management were priorities for the State Government of Pernambuco. Challenges at the time of project preparation were the flow of students and the quality of education in fundamental and secondary education, as Pernambuco’s Basic Education Development Index (IDEB) for fundamental and secondary education scores were lower than the Brazil’s overall score according to the Instituto Nacional de Estudos e Pesquisas Educacionais Anísio Teixeira (INEP). The objectives of the operation were to (a) improve the quality, efficiency, and equity of public education; and (b) introduce management reforms that will lead to greater efficiency in the use of the Borrower’s public resources in the education sector. Ratings for the Pernambuco Education Results and Accountability Project were as follows: outcome was satisfactory, risk to development outcome was moderate, Bank performance was moderately satisfactory, and Borrower performance was satisfactory. Lessons include (i) Formidable results (dropout, distortion, student learning) can be achieved, but these results take time and may not be evident within the typical implementation period of a World Bank operation. (ii) The success and sustainability of this operation depends largely on the government’s commitment to (and ownership of) its comprehensive sector program, sector policies, and sector management system. (iii) Assessment data were used for multiple purposes (including pedagogical purposes) and among multiple stakeholders. (iv) Equity objectives require clear definition and measurement and may need additional efforts. (v) Although the reform began before the World Bank was involved, the World Bank added value through transmission of knowledge from experiences and lessons in Brazil and Pernambuco.